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  1. Absolute monarchy (or absolutism as doctrine) is a form of monarchy in which the monarch is the only one to decide and therefore rules on his own. In this kind of monarchy, the king is somtimes limited by a constitution. However in some of these monarchies, the king is by no means limited and has absolute power.

  2. Absolute monarchy in France slowly emerged in the 16th century and became firmly established during the 17th century.Absolute monarchy is a variation of the governmental form of monarchy in which the monarch holds supreme authority and where that authority is not restricted by any written laws, legislature, or customs.

    • Overview
    • Synopsis
    • Reception

    Absolute Monarchs: A History of the Papacy is a 2011 book by the English popular historian John Julius Norwich published in the United States by Random House. It was published slightly earlier in the UK by Chatto & Windus under the title Popes: A History. It was introduced after Norwich had progressively built his reputation with more than twenty previous published titles and received significant notice in the press.

    As indicated by its title, this is a history of the popes, from Saint Peter to Pope Benedict XVI. Although primarily factual, Norwich enlivens the historical record by sharing commentary and indicating motivations for the parties' decisions and actions. For example, in treating Charles Martel, Norwich asks if he would stop the advance of the Lombards and answers, "Perhaps, but he would not be hurried." Accordingly, the reader is presented with the grand strategy and moral dilemmas of the times,

    New York Times reviewer Bill Keller states of Norwich, "He keeps things moving at nearly beach-read pace by being selective about where he lingers and by adopting the tone of an enthusiastic tour guide, expert but less than reverent." The reviewer noted that Norwich has little to say about the theology of the Popes, and treats their doctrinal disputes as a diplomatic matter. Los Angeles Times reviewer Janet Kinosian writes of Norwich, "with his unstuffy and sometimes witty writing style, he walk

    • John Julius Norwich
    • 12 July 2011
  3. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › MonarchyMonarchy - Wikipedia

    • Etymology
    • History
    • Characteristics and Role
    • Succession
    • Current Monarchies
    • External Links

    The word "monarch" (Late Latin: monarchia) comes from the Ancient Greek word μονάρχης (monárkhēs), derived from μόνος (mónos, "one, single") and ἄρχω (árkhō, "to rule"): compare ἄρχων (árkhōn, "ruler, chief"). It referred to a single at least nominally absolute ruler. In current usage the word monarchyusually refers to a traditional system of hereditary rule, as elective monarchies are quite rare.

    Monarchies are thought to be preceded by the similar form of prehistoric societal hierarchy known as chiefdom or tribal kingship. Chiefdoms are identified as having formed monarchic states, as in civilizations such as Mesopotamia, Ancient Egypt and the Indus Valley Civilization. In some parts of the world, chiefdoms became monarchies. Some of the oldest recorded and evidenced monarchies were Narmer, Pharaoh of Ancient Egypt c. 3100 BCE, and Enmebaragesi, a Sumerian King of Kishc. 2600 BCE. From earliest records, monarchs could be directly hereditary, while others were elected from among eligible members. With the Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Sudanic, reconstructed Proto-Indo-European religion, and others, the monarch held sacral functions directly connected to sacrifice and was sometimes identified with having divine ancestry, possibly establishing a notion of the divine right of kings. Polybius identified monarchy as one of three "benign" basic forms of government (monarchy, aristocracy...

    Monarchies are associated with hereditary reign, in which monarchs reign for life[note 2] and the responsibilities and power of the position pass to their child or another member of their family when they die. Most monarchs, both historically and in the modern day, have been born and brought up within a royal family, the centre of the royal household and court. Growing up in a royal family (called a dynasty when it continues for several generations), future monarchsare often trained for their expected future responsibilities as monarch. Different systems of hereditary succession have been used, such as proximity of blood, primogeniture, and agnatic seniority (Salic law). While most monarchs in history have been male, many female monarchs also have reigned. The term "queen regnant" refers to a ruling monarch, while "queen consort" refers to the wife of a reigning king. Rule may be hereditary in practice without being considered a monarchy: there have been some family dictatorships[no...

    Hereditary monarchies

    In a hereditary monarchy, the position of monarch is inherited according to a statutory or customary order of succession, usually within one royal family tracing its origin through a historical dynastyor bloodline. This usually means that the heir to the throne is known well in advance of becoming monarch to ensure a smooth succession. Primogeniture, in which the eldest child of the monarch is first in line to become monarch, is the most common system in hereditary monarchy. The order of succ...

    Elective monarchies

    In an elective monarchy, monarchs are elected or appointed by somebody (an electoral college) for life or a defined period, but then reign like any other monarch. There is no popular vote involved in elective monarchies, as the elective body usually consists of a small number of eligible people. Historical examples of elective monarchy are the Holy Roman Emperors (chosen by prince-electors but often coming from the same dynasty) and the free election of kings of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwe...

    Other ways of succession

    Other ways to success a monarchy can be through claiming alternative votes (e.g. as in the case of the Western Schism), claims of a mandate to rule (e.g. a popular or divine mandate), military occupation, a coup d'état, a will of the previous monarch or treaties between factions inside and outside of a monarchy (e.g. as in the case of the War of the Spanish Succession).

    Currently, there are 43 nations and a population of roughly half a billion people in the world with a monarch as head of state. They fall roughly into the following categories:

  4. Absolute monarchy (or absolutism as doctrine) is a form of monarchy in which the monarch is the only one to decide and therefore rules on his own. In this kind of monarchy, the king is usually limited by a constitution. However in some of these monarchies, the king is by no means limited and has absolute power.

  5. Absolute monarchy is a monarchical form o govrenment in which the monarch haes absolute pouer amang his or her fowk. This page wis last eeditit on 17 ...

  6. Thailand changed from traditional absolute monarchy into a constitutional one in 1932, while the Kingdom of Bhutan changed in 2008. The Kingdom of Cambodia had its own monarchy after independence from the French Colonial Empire, which was deposed after the Khmer Rouge came into power.

    Monarchy
    Official Local Name (s)
    Title Of Head Of State
    Monarch
    In Catalan: Principat d'Andorra
    Joan-Enric Vives Emmanuel Macron
    In English: Antigua and Barbuda
    In English: Commonwealth of Australia
    In English: Commonwealth of the Bahamas
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