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  1. The House of Habsburg: A Genealogy of the Descendants of Empress Maria Theresia. Clearfield, 1996. Crankshaw, Edward. The Fall of the House of Habsburg. Sphere Books Limited, London, 1970. (First published by Longmans in 1963.) Evans, Robert J. W. The Making of the Habsburg Monarchy, 1550–1700: An Interpretation. Clarendon Press, 1979.

  2. The House of Habsburg gathered dynastic momentum during the 11th, 12th, and 13th centuries, and in 1273, Radbot's seventh-generation descendant Rudolph of Habsburg became Roman-German King. He moved the family's power base to the Duchy of Austria , which the Habsburgs ruled until 1918.

  3. The term House of Bourbon ("Maison de Bourbon") is sometimes used to refer to this first house and the House of Bourbon-Dampierre, the second family to rule the seigneury. In 1272, Robert, Count of Clermont , sixth and youngest son of King Louis IX of France , married Beatrix of Bourbon , heiress to the lordship of Bourbon and member of the House of Bourbon-Dampierre. [2]

  4. Pages in category "House of Habsburg" The following 55 pages are in this category, out of 55 total. This list may not reflect recent changes.

  5. The House of Braganza originated with Afonso I, an illegitimate son of King John I of Portugal, founder of the House of Aviz, and Inês Pires. Though Afonso was illegitimate, his father valued and cared for him a great deal, demonstrated by his arrangement of Afonso's marriage to Beatriz Pereira de Alvim, daughter of Nuno Álvares Pereira, Portugal's most important general and a personal ...

  6. The House of Schwarzenberg is a German and Czech aristocratic family, and it was one of the most prominent European noble houses. The Schwarzenbergs are members of the German nobility and Czech nobility and they held the rank of Princes of the Holy Roman Empire .

  7. It was only in the 19th century that one of the many Ernestine branches, the House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, regained importance through marriages as the "stud of Europe", by ascending the thrones of Belgium (in 1831), Portugal (1853–1910), Bulgaria (1908–1946) and the United Kingdom (1901-present, though the relevant marriage had taken place in 1840) and also providing a consort to the ...