Yahoo Search Búsqueda en la Web

  1. Cerca de 15.200 resultados de búsqueda
  1. Anuncio
    relacionado con: Kirkwood gap wikipedia
  2. Find Your Favorites For The Season at Gap®. Shop The Latest Styles Online Today! Buy Online, Pick Up Curbside. Earn Points W/ Every Purchase & Redeem On Styles You Like.

    4160 Summit Plaza Dr, Louisville, KY · Directions · (502) 412-0235
  1. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Kirkwood_gapKirkwood gap - Wikipedia

    A Kirkwood gap is a gap or dip in the distribution of the semi-major axes (or equivalently of the orbital periods) of the orbits of main-belt asteroids.They correspond to the locations of orbital resonances with Jupiter.

  2. Kirkwood gaps are areas of the asteroid belt where asteroids are unusually scarce, as seen in the graph on the right. They are caused by orbital resonances with Jupiter . The gaps were first noticed in 1857 by Daniel Kirkwood , who also correctly explained their origin in the orbital resonances with Jupiter while a professor at Jefferson College in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania .

  3. For example, the 3:1 Kirkwood gap is located where the ratio of an asteroid's orbital period to that of Jupiter is 3/1 (the asteroid completes 3 orbits for every 1 orbit of Jupiter). The effect of these mean-motion resonances is a change in the asteroid's orbital elements (particularly semimajor axis) sufficient to create these gaps in semimajor axis space.

    • English: This histogram clearly shows the primary Kirkwood gaps in the asteroid main-belt. These gaps (labeled "3:1", "5:2", "7:3", "2:1") are caused by mean-motion resonances between an asteroid and Jupiter. For example, the 3:1 Kirkwood gap is located where the ratio of an asteroid's orbital period to that of Jupiter is 3/1 (the asteroid completes 3 orbits for every 1 orbit of Jupiter). The effect of these mean-motion resonances is a change in the asteroid's orbital elements (particularly semimajor axis) sufficient to create these gaps in semimajor axis space., Español: Este histograma muestra claramente los huecos de Kirkwood primarios del cinturón principal de asteroides. Estos huecos (marcados "3:1", "5:2", "7:3", "2:1") se originan por las resonancias orbitales entre un asteroide y Júpiter. Por ejemplo, el hueco de Kirkwood 3:1 se localiza en el punto en el que el periodo orbital del asteroide guardaría una relación de 3/1 con el de Júpiter (el asteroide completaría justo tres órbitas por cada una de Júpiter). El efecto de estas resonancias orbitales son cambios en los elementos orbitales de los asteroides (principalmente en su semieje mayor) suficientes para generar estos huecos en la distribución espacial de las órbitas asteroidales.
    • Kirkwood_Gaps.svg: based on plot by Alan Chamberlain, JPL/Caltech, derivative work: Rondador (talk)
  4. For example, the 3:1 Kirkwood gap is located where the ratio of an asteroid's orbital period to that of Jupiter is 3/1 (the asteroid completes 3 orbits for every 1 orbit of Jupiter). The effect of these mean-motion resonances is a change in the asteroid's orbital elements (particularly semimajor axis) sufficient to create these gaps in semimajor axis space.

    • "By" Dimension
    • Cause of The Gaps
    • Rendering of The Gaps
    • Weak Gaps
    • A Thought on The Date
    • Ambiguous Sentence with Undefined Jargon

    Minor point for sake of clarity, not altering the intended meaning. Original definition implied that gaps were in a distribution along some undefined axis of the universe of "all asteroids having a semi-major axis" as opposed to asteroids without one. All asteroids do have a semi-major axis. In statistics a distribution is generally defined as "by" a dimension along which sample or universe frequency, density, probability etc. are reported or estimated. I changed "with" to "by". [ I like this discussion! ] Spamhog (talk) 14:57, 28 February 2013 (UTC)

    There is no doubt that the gaps are caused by orbital resonances with Jupiter. Hence, I have removed the parts of the article which implied that this was somehow disputed. The abstract that was referenced in older versions of the article was about research that showed that the orbits of several asteroids which do exist in the gaps have orbits that are practically stable over timescales of 1000 Jupiter years (About 10000 Earth years). However, this is a very short time scale astronomically. The orbits of asteroids in the resonances change significantly only over times of many millions of years. Over the age of the solar system, there has been more than enough time to sweep the Kirkwood gaps clean many times over. Deuar20:43, 21 December 2005 (UTC)

    I've uploaded (but not installed into the article) the attached image of the gaps based on a diagram I found in Murray/Dermott's Solar System Dynamics. It seems to be a better image than the flat histogram shown in the article. Would it be useful? Or just misleading? It may also need some markup -- maybe some of the resonances given circles of different colours? mdf20:13, 31 March 2006 (UTC) 1. Looks like a very good diagram. Overall I think it's more appealing than the present histogram because of the way it's instantly clear what is meant (well, I think so, but It's possible i've just been hanging around these asteroids for too long), and it's just cool-looking graphically. Ah, and it shows a wider range in semi-major axis as well. The histogram is still kind of nice in that it gives precise numbers, and labels the major gaps. Maybe it could be kept but moved down to second place. 2. I'm a bit puzzled that the trojans don't really cluster into two distinct groups, but maybe they'r...

    There are a bunch of weak gaps mentioned in the article. They're not visible in the histogram. Are they real gaps in the distribution (narrow, perhaps?), or just calculated locations of resonances which do not lead to any significant depletion of asteroids? Deuar16:22, 26 February 2007 (UTC)

    The article dates the discovery of the gaps to 1857. The source it links to ("Banners in the Wilderness") gives the date 1866 and states that Kirkland only taught at Canonsburg from 1865-7. Now, he may well have noticed the gaps in 1857, but the source does not support that and his paper on the subject was printed in 1866. I am going to alter the date, but if someone with better access to sources can show it was '57, please revert! :) Jellyandjocko (talk) 23:06, 10 January 2014 (UTC)

    I was going to break apart this sentence to make it clearer, and then I realized that I couldn't parse its meaning: "Most of the Kirkwood gaps are depleted, unlike the mean-motion resonances (MMR) of Neptune or Jupiter's 3:2 resonance, due to the overlapping of the ν5 and ν6 secular resonances within the mean-motion resonances." Firstly, it's not clear from its structure whether the overlapping causes the depletion or the exceptions to depletion. Secondly, the ambiguity is partly due to the undefined v5 and v6 terms. Where are those little terms defined? Would someone who is so immersed in this that my point seems pointless please link the v5 & v6 to something and then break apart (or re-order) the sentence so it's clear which clause it's modifying. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Jeffryfisher (talk • contribs) 02:03, 10 February 2017 (UTC) 1. The mean motion resonances of Neptune are occupied, an example is the plutinos. Similarly the Hilda group are in a 3:2 resonance with J...

  5. Brecha de Kirkwood - Kirkwood gap De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre Histograma que muestra las cuatro brechas de Kirkwood más prominentes y una posible división en asteroides del cinturón principal interno, medio y externo :

  1. Anuncio
    relacionado con: Kirkwood gap wikipedia
  2. Top 10 Coolest Kirkwood Hotel 2021. 5 Star Boutique Small Luxury Hotels. Best Hotels. Low Rates. Fast & Simple. 24/7 Support.

    The closest thing to an exhaustive search you can find - SMH