Yahoo Search Búsqueda en la Web

  1. Cerca de 14.100 resultados de búsqueda
  1. Maria Elisabeth was born in Landshut, Electorate of Bavaria, the only daughter and second child of Duke Wilhelm in Bavaria and his wife Countess Palatine Maria Anna of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld, sister of the future king Maximilian I Joseph of Bavaria. She died in Paris, France, aged 65. Marriage and issue

    • 9 March 1808 – 3 June 1814
    • 1 June 1849 (aged 65), Paris, France
  2. Queen Elisabeth Gabriele Valérie Marie of Bavaria (25 July 1876 – 23 November 1965) was the Queen of the Belgians from 23 December 1909 to 17 February 1934 as the spouse of King Albert I, and a duchess in Bavaria by birth. She was the mother of King Leopold III of Belgium and of Queen Marie-José of Italy, and grandmother of Kings Baudouin ...

  3. This article is within the scope of WikiProject Women's History, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Women's history and related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.

  4. Duchess Maria Anna Henriette Gabrielle Julie in Bavaria (born 7 May 1975 in Munich), firstly married on 8 September 2007 in Munich, Klaus Runow (born 3 July 1964 in Duisburg), an investment banker. Their divorce was announced in early 2015. Maria-Anna secondly married on 16 October 2015, Baron Andreas von Maltzahn (born 1964), son of Mortimer von Maltzahn and Stephanie von Zedlitz und Leipe.

    • Biography
    • Assassination
    • Legacy
    • Portrayal of Elisabeth in The Arts
    • Honours
    • References
    • External Links

    Duchess in Bavaria

    Born Elisabeth Amalie Eugenie on 24 December 1837 in Munich, Bavaria, she was the third child and second daughter of Duke Maximilian Joseph in Bavaria and Princess Ludovika of Bavaria, the half-sister of King Ludwig I of Bavaria. Maximilian was considered to be rather peculiar; he had a childish love of circuses and traveled the Bavarian countryside to escape his duties. The family's homes were the Herzog-Max-Palais in Munich during winter and Possenhofen Castlein the summer months, far from...

    Empress of Austria

    After enjoying an informal and unstructured childhood, Elisabeth, who was shy and introverted by nature, and more so among the stifling formality of Habsburg court life, had difficulty adapting to the Hofburg and its rigid protocols and strict etiquette. Within a few weeks, Elisabeth started to display health problems: she had fits of coughing and became anxious and frightened whenever she had to descend a narrow steep staircase. She was surprised to find she was pregnant and gave birth to he...

    Physical regimen

    At 173 cm (5 feet 8 inches), Elisabeth was unusually tall. Even after four pregnancies she maintained her weight at approximately 50 kg (110 pounds) for the rest of her life. She achieved this through fasting and exercise, such as gymnastics and riding. In deep mourning after her daughter Sophie's death, Elisabeth refused to eat for days; a behavior that would reappear in later periods of melancholy and depression. Whereas she previously had supper with the family, she now began to avoid this...

    In 1898, despite warnings of possible assassination attempts, the 60-year-old Elisabeth traveled incognito to Geneva, Switzerland. However, someone from the Hôtel Beau-Rivagerevealed that the Empress of Austria was their guest. At 1:35 p.m. on Saturday 10 September 1898, Elisabeth and Countess Irma Sztáray de Sztára et Nagymihály, her lady-in-waiti...

    Upon her death, Franz Joseph founded the Order of Elizabethin memory of her. In the Volksgarten of Vienna, there is an elaborate memorial monument featuring a seated statue of the Empress by Hans Bitterlich, dedicated on 4 June 1907. On the promenade in Territet Switzerland, there is a monument to the Empress created by Antonio Chiattone[de]in 1902...

    Stage

    In 1932 the comic operetta Sissi premiered in Vienna. Composed by Fritz Kreisler, the libretto was written by Ernst and Hubert Marischka, with orchestrations by Robert Russell Bennett.Although the pet name of the empress was always spelled "Sisi," never "Sissi," this incorrect version of her name persisted in the works about her that followed. In 1943 Jean Cocteau wrote a play about an imagined meeting between Elisabeth and her assassin, L'Aigle à deux têtes(The Eagle with Two Heads). It was...

    Ballet

    In his 1978 ballet, Mayerling Kenneth MacMillan portrayed Elisabeth in a pas de deuxwith her son Prince Rudolf, the principal character in the ballet. In 1993 French ballerina Sylvie Guillem appeared in a piece entitled, Sissi, l'impératice anarchiste (Sissi, Anarchist Empress), choreographed by Maurice Béjart to Strauss's Emperor Waltz.

    Film

    The 1921 film Kaiserin Elisabeth von Österreich was one of the first films to focus entirely on Elisabeth. It was co-written by Elisabeth's niece, Marie Larisch (who played her younger self at the age of 62), and starred Carla Nelsen as the title character. The film later achieved notoriety when a group of con-artistsstarted selling stills from the murder scene as actual photographs of the crime. Adolf Trotz directed the 1931 German film Elisabeth of Austria. In 1936, Columbia Pictures releas...

    Russian Empire: Grand Cross of St. Catherine, October 1853
    Spain: Dame of the Order of Queen Maria Luisa, 16 June 1854
    Mexican Empire: Grand Cross of St. Charles, 10 April 1865
    United Kingdom: Dame Grand Cross of the Order of St John, 23 May 1873

    Bibliography

    1. Nicole Avril: L'impératrice, Paris, 1993 2. Jennifer Bowers Bahney: "Stealing Sisi's Star: How a master thief nearly got away with Austria's most famous jewel," (McFarland & Co., 2015) (ISBN 078649722X) 3. Philippe Collas: Louis II de Bavière et Elisabeth d'Autriche, âmes sœurs, Éditions du Rocher, Paris/Monaco 2001 (ISBN 978 2 268 03884 1) 4. Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Elizabeth of Austria" . Encyclopædia Britannica(11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. 5. Konstantin Christomanos: Diar...