Yahoo Search Búsqueda en la Web

  1. Cerca de 78 resultados de búsqueda
  1. Old Style ( O.S.) and New Style ( N.S.) indicate dating systems before and after a calendar change, respectively. Usually, this is the change from the Julian calendar to the Gregorian calendar as enacted in various European countries between 1582 and the 20th century. In England, Wales, Ireland and Britain's American colonies, there were two ...

  2. The dating style used before 1752 – Juian Calendar, year beginning 25 March – is called Old Style Dating and the dating style used today – Gregorian Caledar, year beginning 1 January – is called New Style Dating. So when a date is given in a history book (or an old book), we need to know whether it is using 'New Style' or 'Old Style' dating.

    • Is There A Template For Use in Wikipedia Articles?
    • Equivalent Notations in Eastern and Far-Eastern Cultures
    • "Old Style Calendar" Listed at Redirects For Discussion
    • Start of Year Adjustment

    I've transferred this comment of mine to Wikipedia_talk:Manual_of_Style/Dates_and_numbers#Proposal:_templates_for_working_with_OS/NS_dates. --Quuxplusone (talk) 06:56, 27 December 2018 (UTC)

    I added and then deleted a section on adoption of the Gregorian calendar in e.g. Turkey and Russia. I decided this was a mistake. My intent was to create a context for wlinks from OS or NS tags in articles about Eastern (especially Russian) articles. The "Anglophone" section does that adequately. What we don't have, [and it needs doing by someone w...

    A discussion is taking place to address the redirect Old Style calendar. The discussion will occur at Wikipedia:Redirects for discussion/Log/2020 December 15#Old Style calendar until a consensus is reached, and readers of this page are welcome to contribute to the discussion. Soumya-8974 (he) talk contribs subpages17:35, 15 December 2020 (UTC)

    In the section on start of year adjustment, there is the oddly specific statement "To reduce misunderstandings about the date, it was normal in parish registers" to dual-date the year. Using dual-dates (e.g. 1660/61) appears to have been common and widespread, not just confined to parish registers - it appears in Samuel Peyps' diary, for example - ...

  3. William Shakespeare died on 23 April 1616 (Old Style). If Gregorian is new style, then both passages are screwed up. It gives his old style and Gregorian (new style) death dates as the same. Indeed, much is screwed up (William Shakespeare has, for example, been given a birthdate when his birthdate is unknown). O.S. = Julian. N.S. = Gregorian.

    • Globalize
    • Describing The Skipping of Days
    • I've Been Bold
    • Duplicate Articles
    • Europe

    The article is currently too focused on the UK and devotes little space to developments in other countries. Examples of omitted interesting issues are which provinces of the Netherlands adopted the Gregorian calendar and which did not (in the framework of the Eighty Years' War), or how different parts of what today are Canada and the US adopted the...

    @John Maynard Friedman:tried to improve the description of the skipping of days as follows: I have further revised it as follows: My reasons for the change are 1. The reason given is more fundamental. 2. The meaning of "moving the current date" is unclear; skipping dates is clearer. 3. "Error in the Julian calendar" in combination with "inserted ex...

    and just gone ahead and done it. Maybe I should have done a sandbox version first. If anybody really doesn't like it, go ahead and revert: we can discuss a sandbox version. --John Maynard Friedman (talk) 00:45, 15 November 2016 (UTC) 1. I do not think you should have been bold without first discussing it further. You wrote above "Your hypothetical ...

    @user:PanchoS I have removed you header from the top of the article. Maintenance templates such as this which convey solely editor to editor information should be placed on the talk page that is what the talk page is for. Or put another way what possible information was included in {{Duplication}}that is informative for readers? I ran Earwig's Copy...

    I have included Ireland and its act in the article (diff). However when looking into that issue I came across this line in the British act: "In and throughout all his Majesty’s dominions and countries in Europe, Asia, Africa, and America, belonging or subject to the crown of Great Britain" (Act). What if anything does Europe cover? 1. It presumably...