Yahoo Search Búsqueda en la Web

  1. Cerca de 4.820.000 resultados de búsqueda
  1. Anuncios
    relacionados con: William I of the Netherlands wikipedia
  2. 1 millón+ usuarios visitaron us.searchley.com el mes pasado

    Search William Paterson Fnp Program, Top Information From Trusted Internet Sources. William Paterson Fnp Program, Get Expert Advice and Curated Content on Searchley

  1. William I (Willem Frederik, Prince of Orange-Nassau; 24 August 1772 – 12 December 1843) was a Prince of Orange, the King of the Netherlands and Grand Duke of Luxembourg . He was the son of the last Stadtholder of the Dutch Republic. After an agreement with Napoleon, he became the ruler of the Principality of Nassau-Orange-Fulda from 1803 ...

  2. William I of the Netherlands. William I (Willem Frederik, Prince of Orange-Nassau; 24 August 1772 – 12 December 1843) was a Prince of Orange, the King of the Netherlands and Grand Duke of Luxembourg .

    • 9 April 1806 – 27 October 1806
    • 16 March 1815 – 7 October 1840
  3. 25/05/2021 · William I (Willem Frederik, Prince of Orange-Nassau; 24 August 1772 – 12 December 1843) was a Prince of Orange, the King of the Netherlands and Grand Duke of Luxembourg. William I William in ceremonial robes, by Joseph Paelinck , 1819

  4. Category:William I of the Netherlands. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Jump to navigation Jump to search. The main article for this category is William I of the Netherlands.

    • Disambiguation
    • Pov Issues
    • Dates?
    • Hereditary Stadtholder?
    • Reignal Name
    • Name of Republic
    • Monarchical Styles Infobox
    • Relation to Napoleon
    • New Sections About Military Career and Exile
    • Potential Confusion About Erfprins and Erfstadhouder

    There are really three different people that need to be un-confused here: 1. Willem I Count of Holland, (1203-1222) 2. Willem I, Stadtholder of Holland died 1584 ([[William I of Orange]) 3. Willem I King of the Netherlands (this one) jcwf 1. It's not that big an issue, at least as far as the title is concerned. The first one is not a problem, since he was count of Holland only. The second, William the Silent never had "of the Netherlands" in his title (stadtholders belonged to each province individually, even if they were stadtholder in most of them at the same time, the United Provinces were not a unified state). So, only the latter was ever properly "William of the Netherlands". A bigger problem would be disambiguating all the different William of Oranges, since the latter could also be called "William I of Orange (Nassau)"... Scipius18:01 Oct 4, 2002 (UTC) OK jcwf

    'The purpose was exterminating Catholicism and French' is highly non-NPOV and simply untrue. There is no indication of that at all. In fact in protestant cicles there was unhapiness about the king too, because he wanted too much influence on the dutch reformed church. Later there was even a schism about that. The remark that Willem was strongly reformed is probably not accurate either therefore. What is true is that in Belgium this king has long been vilified as 'raison d'être' for the Belgian state. Ironically that is even so in Flanders although the king's insistance of Dutch as national language was one of the main reasons that he lost his mostly francophone/liberal support in the south. Flanders went along with the rebellion because the Catholic church was very powerful there and the Church wanted a political foothold in this part of Europe. The sudden alliance of liberals and catholics is known as the monsteralliance. The Flemish people paid a heavy price for the emergence of t...

    On this page the dates of the reign of William I are said to be 1813-1843, but on Dutch monarchy they claim the dates to be 1815-1840. One of these should be corrected. — Asbestos | Talk09:20, 8 Dec 2004 (UTC) William became Sovereign Prince, or some such, in 1813, but the Kingdom of the Netherlands was only created in 1815. He abdicated in 1840, and died in 1843 (as is explained in the article). john k20:09, 8 Dec 2004 (UTC)

    The following statement appears in the article: 1. William was hereditary stadtholder when the Republic of the Seven United Provinces was invaded by the French Revolutionary armies. Is "hereditary stadtholder" a proper title that refers to the heir to the stadtholdership, as in the current Luxembourgish title "Hereditary Grand Duke"? If so, the title should be capitalized. If not, this sentence should be corrected, as in common English usage it implies erroneously that William had inherited the stadtholdership before the French invasion. RussBlau10:29, 17 Mar 2005 (UTC) 1. 1.1. He was Hereditary Stadtholder (Dutch: erfstadhouder) in the same sense as Henri of Luxembourg used to be Hereditary Grand Duke. --84.26.109.6917:01, 17 Jan 2006 (UTC) 1. 1.1. 1.1.1. I don't think so. The Hereditary Stadtholders since 1747 were William IV and William V. They weren't monarchs in the sense that they were sovereigns. No titles existed for the family members of the Hereditary Stadtholder. Gerard v...

    During his reign,, gentlemen, was he styled as Willem or Willem I?--Anglius20:16, 12 February 2006 (UTC) 1. Willem. Without the ordinal. Gerard von Hebel (talk) 19:52, 6 July 2012 (UTC)

    I've reverted the changes by Alast0r. The correct name of the state was indeed Republic of the Seven United Provinces. Mvdleeuw12:15, 28 April 2006 (UTC) 1. There was no official name in the present sense. The use of the term "Seven Netherlands" was coined by historians. A name used in 18th century diplomacy however was "United Provinces". Gerard von Hebel (talk) 19:55, 6 July 2012 (UTC) 1. 1.1. Mr. Von Hebel is correct - "The Republic of the United Provinces" is the correct name. 62.238.249.71 (talk) 19:23, 17 May 2013 (UTC)

    This infobox, besides looking like a gaudy wine label, doesn't have any practical use in this biography. It's a bit silly (and not at all reverent) to address a King of the Netherlands in English, especially when he has been in his tomb for a long time. I'm going to remove it, as (for instance) happened on the King Christian VIII of Denmark page. Glatisant (talk) 12:32, 29 March 2009 (UTC)

    "Napoleon Bonaparte gave him some small German principalities as indemnities for the lost territories." Yeah sure.. That sounds, to me, like Napoleon gave it to him, like a sort of compensation. I remember that from the history books I read, that Willem I begged Napoleon to give him something. Hence treason, and opportunistic, and not really caring if he would be ruler of the Netherlands or any other part of the world, just as long as it would give him status. Now this might be my person political point of view, but you might want to reconsider that phrase. Ok, I am Dutch, and I am republican, I admit. — Preceding unsigned comment added by AntonHogervorst (talk • contribs) 10:57, 16 March 2011 (UTC)

    I have added information about the Hereditary Princes's military career during the Flanders Campaign and his activities in exile, accompanied by citations. Strangely, those are difficult to find, except in the older literature. I was forced to go back to François de Bas and his magisterial books about William's younger son Prince Frederick of the Netherlands, which is now available in Google Books online (so I have provided links). Unfortunately only in Dutch. For English references Simon Schama is the authority, but he is rather hostile to William, rightly so, in my view :-)Though I have provided citations for my additions, the article remains bereft of citations in other parts. I think those may best be provided by the editors who wrote the older text.--Ereunetes (talk) 22:50, 1 April 2013 (UTC)

    As Prince of Orange originally was a regnal title, only one person at a time could be "Prince of Orange" (just as there can only be one "King of the Netherlands" at a time). This potentially created the problem what to call his eldest son while both were alive. Interestingly, this problem for the first time arose in practice only with William VI/I, because previously there never were adult eldest sons alive during their father's reign. William the Silent inherited the title at age eleven from René of Châlon by testamentary provision, when the latter died in 1544. Both Maurice and Frederick Henry inherited the title from an elder brother and were referred to as "count of Nassau" before that. William II inherited the principality already in 1647 (at age 21) so there were only three years during which the styling problem potentially arose (as during people's minority there usually is no need to differentiate them from their father), but I think in practice it never arose. William III w...

  5. William I, Dutch in full Willem Frederik, (born Aug. 24, 1772, The Hague, Neth.—died Dec. 12, 1843, Berlin [Germany]), king of the Netherlands and grand duke of Luxembourg (1815–40) who sparked a commercial and industrial revival following the period of French rule (1795–1813), but provoked the Belgian revolt of 1830 through his autocratic methods.

  1. Anuncios
    relacionados con: William I of the Netherlands wikipedia
  2. Reputation Profiles include free contact info & photos + criminal & court records. See your own Reputation & Score, too - Profiles are shown over 300 million times monthly.

  3. 1 millón+ usuarios visitaron us.searchley.com el mes pasado

    Search William Paterson Fnp Program, Top Information From Trusted Internet Sources. William Paterson Fnp Program, Get Expert Advice and Curated Content on Searchley