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  1. Kingdom of Great Britain - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Kingdom_of_Great_Britain

    The Kingdom of Great Britain, officially called Great Britain, was a sovereign state in Western Europe from 1 May 1707 to 1 January 1801.

  2. United Kingdom - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › United_kingdom

    The Acts of Union 1707 declared that the Kingdom of England and Kingdom of Scotland were "United into One Kingdom by the Name of Great Britain". The term "United Kingdom" has occasionally been used as a description for the former kingdom of Great Britain, although its official name from 1707 to 1800 was simply "Great Britain".

  3. Reino Unido - Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre

    es.wikipedia.org › wiki › United_Kingdom_of_Great

    El Reino Unido (en inglés, United Kingdom), [nota 1] oficialmente Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte (en inglés, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland) [nota 2] o de forma abreviada RU (en inglés, UK), es un país soberano e insular ubicado al noroeste de la Europa continental.

  4. Kingdom of Great Britain - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org › wiki › Kingdom_of_Great_Britain

    The United Kingdom of Great Britain was a state in the British Isles. The kingdom came into existence because of the Acts of Union 1707. These acts of parliament joined together the Kingdom of Scotland and the Kingdom of England. The kingdom's lands were Great Britain and some other islands in the British Isles. Throughout its existence, the kingdom was in a personal union with the Kingdom of Ireland. Outside the British Isles, Great Britain governed other lands and started ...

    • London
    • Constitutional monarchy
  5. Reino de Gran Bretaña - Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre

    es.wikipedia.org › wiki › Reino_de_Gran_Bretaña
    • Estructura Política
    • Reyes de Gran Bretaña
    • Véase también

    Los reinos de Inglaterra y Escocia, ambos en existencia desde el siglo IX, eran estados independientes hasta que los actos de la unión entraron en vigor en 1707. Sin embargo, habían llegado a una unión personal en 1603, cuando Jacobo VI de Escocia sucedió a su prima Isabel I de Inglaterra como rey de Inglaterra (con el nombre de Jacobo I). Esta unión de las coronas en la Casa de Estuardo significaba que el conjunto de la isla de Gran Bretaña era gobernada ahora por un solo monarca, que en virtud de la corona inglesa también gobernó sobre el reino de Irlanda. Cada uno de los reinos mantuvo su propio parlamento y leyes (aunque hubo un breve intento de unión durante el interregno en el siglo XVII). Esta disposición cambió dramáticamente cuando el Acta de Unión de 1707 entró en vigor, con una corona unificada de Gran Bretaña y un solo parlamento unificado. Sin embargo, Irlanda se mantuvo formalmente separada hasta los actos de la Unión de 1801. El Tratado de la Unión, a condición de que...

    1707–1714: Ana I, reina de Inglaterra, Escocia, e Irlanda (de Irlanda desde 1702).
    1714–1727: Jorge I.
    1727–1760: Jorge II.
    1760–1801: Jorge III (continuó reinando como rey del Reino Unido hasta 1820).
  6. Great Britain - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Great_Britain
    • Terminology
    • History
    • Geography
    • Demographics
    • See Also
    • External Links

    Toponymy

    The archipelago has been referred to by a single name for over 2000 years: the term 'British Isles' derives from terms used by classical geographers to describe this island group. By 50 BC Greek geographers were using equivalents of Prettanikē as a collective name for the British Isles. However, with the Roman conquest of Britain the Latin term Britannia was used for the island of Great Britain, and later Roman-occupied Britain south of Caledonia. The earliest known name for Great Britain is...

    Derivation of Great

    The Greco-Egyptian scientist Ptolemy referred to the larger island as great Britain (μεγάλη Βρεττανία megale Brettania) and to Ireland as little Britain (μικρὰ Βρεττανία mikra Brettania) in his work Almagest (147–148 AD). In his later work, Geography (c. 150 AD), he gave the islands the names Alwion, Iwernia, and Mona (the Isle of Man), suggesting these may have been the names of the individual islands not known to him at the time of writing Almagest. The name Albion appears to have fallen ou...

    Modern use of the term Great Britain

    Great Britain refers geographically to the island of Great Britain. Politically, it may refer to the whole of England, Scotland and Wales, including their smaller offshore islands. It is not correct to use the term to refer to the whole of the United Kingdom which includes Northern Ireland. Similarly, Britain can refer to either all islands in Great Britain, the largest island, or the political grouping of countries. There is no clear distinction, even in government documents: the UK governme...

    Prehistoric period

    Great Britain was probably first inhabited by those who crossed on the land bridge from the European mainland. Human footprints have been found from over 800,000 years ago in Norfolk and traces of early humans have been found (at Boxgrove Quarry, Sussex) from some 500,000 years ago and modern humans from about 30,000 years ago. Until about 14,000 years ago, it was connected to Ireland, and as recently as 8,000 years ago it retained a land connection to the continent, with an area of mostly lo...

    Roman and medieval period

    The Romans conquered most of the island (up to Hadrian's Wall in northern England) and this became the Ancient Roman province of Britannia. In the course of the 500 years after the Roman Empire fell, the Britons of the south and east of the island were assimilated or displaced by invading Germanic tribes (Angles, Saxons, and Jutes, often referred to collectively as Anglo-Saxons). At about the same time, Gaelic tribes from Ireland invaded the north-west, absorbing both the Picts and Britons of...

    Early modern period

    On 20 October 1604 King James, who had succeeded separately to the two thrones of England and Scotland, proclaimed himself "King of Great Brittaine, France, and Ireland". When James died in 1625 and the Privy Council of England was drafting the proclamation of the new king, Charles I, a Scottish peer, Thomas Erskine, 1st Earl of Kellie, succeeded in insisting that it use the phrase "King of Great Britain", which James had preferred, rather than King of Scotland and England (or vice versa). Wh...

    Great Britain lies on the European continental shelf, part of the Eurasian Plate and off the north-west coast of continental Europe, separated from this European mainland by the North Sea and by the English Channel, which narrows to 34 km (18 nmi; 21 mi) at the Straits of Dover. It stretches over about ten degrees of latitude on its longer, north–south axis and covers 209,331 km2 (80,823 sq mi), excluding the much smaller surrounding islands. The North Channel, Irish Sea, St George's Channel and Celtic Sea separate the island from the island of Ireland to its west. The island is since 1993 joined, via one structure, with continental Europe: the Channel Tunnel, the longest undersea rail tunnel in the world. The island is marked by low, rolling countryside in the east and south, while hills and mountains predominate in the western and northern regions. It is surrounded by over 1,000 smaller islands and islets. The greatest distance between two points is 968.0 km (601+1⁄2 mi) (between...

    Settlements

    London is the capital of England and the whole of the United Kingdom, and is the seat of the United Kingdom's government. Edinburgh and Cardiff are the capitals of Scotland and Wales, respectively, and house their devolved governments. Largest urban areas

    Language

    In the Late Bronze Age, Britain was part of a culture called the Atlantic Bronze Age, held together by maritime trading, which also included Ireland, France, Spain and Portugal. In contrast to the generally accepted view that Celtic originated in the context of the Hallstatt culture, since 2009, John T. Koch and others have proposed that the origins of the Celtic languages are to be sought in Bronze Age Western Europe, especially the Iberian Peninsula.Koch et al.'s proposal has failed to find...

    Religion

    Christianity has been the largest religion by number of adherents since the Early Middle Ages: it was introduced under the ancient Romans, developing as Celtic Christianity. According to tradition, Christianity arrived in the 1st or 2nd century. The most popular form is Anglicanism (known as Episcopalism in Scotland). Dating from the 16th-century Reformation, it regards itself as both Catholic and Reformed. The Head of the Church is the monarch of the United Kingdom, as the Supreme Governor....

  7. United Kingdom - Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    simple.wikipedia.org › wiki › United_Kingdom
    • Prehistory
    • History
    • Geography
    • Politics
    • Military
    • Economy
    • Literature
    • Education
    • Media
    • Transport

    Species of humans have lived in Britain, for almost a million years. The occupation was not continuous, probably because the climatewas too extreme at times for people to live there. Archaeological remains show that the first group of modern people to live in the British Isles were hunter-gatherers after the last ice age ended. The date is not known: perhaps as early as 8000BC but certainly by 5000BC. They built mesolithic wood and stone monuments. Stonehenge was built between 3000 and 1600BC. Celtic tribes arrived from mainland Europe. Britain was a changing collection of tribal areas, with no overall leader. Julius Caesar tried to invade (take over) the island in 55BC but was not able to do so. The Romans successfully invaded in 43AD.

    Written history began in Britain when writing was brought to Britain by the Romans. Rome ruled in Britain from 44AD to 410AD. They ruled the southern two-thirds of Great Britain. The Romans never took over Ireland and never fully controlled Caledonia, the land north of the valleys of the River Forth and River Clyde. Their northern border varied from time to time, and was marked sometimes at Hadrian's Wall (in modern England), sometimes at the Antonine Wall(in modern Scotland). After the Romans, waves of immigrants came to Britain. Some were German tribes: the Angles, Saxons and Jutes. Others were Celts, like the Scoti, who came to Great Britain from Ireland. English and Scots are Germanic languages. They developed from Old English, the language spoken by the Anglo-Saxons of Anglo-Saxon England, an area stretching from the River Forth to the River Tamar.

    The UK is north-west off the coast of mainland Europe. Around the UK are the North Sea, the English Channel and the Atlantic Ocean. The UK also rules, usually indirectly, a number of smaller places (mostly islands) around the world, which are known as British Overseas Territories. They were once part of the British Empire. Examples are Gibraltar (on the Iberian Peninsula next to the Strait of Gibraltar) and the Falkland Islands(in the south Atlantic Ocean). In the British Isles, the UK is made up of four different countries: Wales, England and Scotland and Northern Ireland. The capital city of Wales is Cardiff. The capital city of England is London. The capital city of Scotland is Edinburgh and the capital city of Northern Ireland is Belfast. Other large cities in the UK are Birmingham, Bristol, Manchester, Liverpool, Newcastle upon Tyne, Leeds, Sheffield, Glasgow, Southampton, Leicester, Coventry, Bradford and Nottingham. The physical geography of the UK varies greatly. England con...

    The United Kingdom is a parliamentary democracy based on a constitutional monarchy. The people of the United Kingdom vote for a members of Parliament to speak for them and to make laws for them. Queen Elizabeth II is the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and is the head of state. The government, led by the Prime Minister, governs the country and appoints cabinet ministers. Today, the Prime Minister is Boris Johnson, who is the leader of the centre-right Conservative Party. Parliament is where laws are made. It has three parts: the House of Commons, the House of Lords, and the Queen. The House of Commons is the most powerful part. It is where Members of Parliament sit. The Prime Minister sits here as well, because they are a Member of Parliament. Scotland has its own devolved Parliament with power to make laws on things like education, health and Scottish law. Northern Ireland and Wales have their own devolved legislatures which have some powers but le...

    The United Kingdom has one of the most advanced militaries in the world, alongside such countries such as the USA and France, and operates a large navy (Royal Navy), a sizable army, (British Army) and an air force (Royal Air Force). From the 18th century to the early 20th century, the United Kingdom was one of the most powerful nations in the world, with a large and powerful navy (due to the fact it was surrounded by sea, so a large navy was the most practical option). This status has faded in recent times, but it remains a member of various military groups such as the UN Security Council and NATO. It is also still seen as a great military power.

    The United Kingdom is a developed country with the sixth largest economy in the world. It was a superpowerduring the 18th, 19th and early 20th century and was considered since the early 1800s to be the most powerful and influential nation in the world, in politics, economics (For it was the wealthiest country at the time.) and in military strength. Britain continued to be the biggest manufacturing economy in the world until 1908 and the largest economy until the 1920s. The economic cost of two world wars and the decline of the British Empire in the 1950s and 1960s reduced its leading role in global affairs. The United Kingdom has strong economic, cultural, military and political influence and is a nuclear power. The United Kingdom holds a permanent seat on the United Nations Security Council, and is a member of the G8, NATO, World Trade Organization and the Commonwealth of Nations. The City of London, in the capital, is famous as being the largest centre of financein the world.

    William Shakespeare was an English playwright. He wrote plays in the late 16th century. Some of his plays were Romeo and Juliet and Macbeth. In the 19th century, Jane Austen and Charles Dickens were novelists. Twentieth century writers include the science fiction novelist H. G. Wells and J. R. R. Tolkien. The children's fantasy Harry Potter series was written by J. K. Rowling. Aldous Huxleywas also from the United Kingdom. English language literature is written by authors from many countries. Eight people from the United Kingdom have won the Nobel Prize in Literature. Seamus Heaney is a writer who was born in Northern Ireland. Arthur Conan Doyle from Scotland wrote the Sherlock Holmes detective novels. He was from Edinburgh. The poet Dylan Thomasbrought Welsh culture to international attention.

    The nature of education is a devolved matter in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. They, and England, have separate, but similar, systems of education. They all have laws that a broad education is required from ages five to eighteen, except for in Scotland where school departure is allowed from the age of sixteen. Pupils attend state funded schools (academy schools, faith schools, grammar schools, city technology colleges, studio schools) and other children attend independent schools (known as public schools). There have been universities in Britain since the Middle Ages. The "ancient universities" started in this time and in the Renaissance. They are: the University of Oxford, the University of Cambridge, the University of St Andrews, the University of Glasgow, the University of Aberdeen, and the University of Edinburgh. These are the oldest universities in the English-speaking world. The University of Cambridge, the University of Oxford, and London universities (University Coll...

    The BBC is an organisation in the United Kingdom. It broadcasts in the United Kingdom and other countries on television, radio and the Internet. The BBC also sells its programmes to other broadcasting companies around world. The organisation is run by a group of twelve governors who have been given the job by the Queen, on the advice of government ministers.

    Road traffic in the United Kingdom drives on the left hand side of the road (unlike the Americas and most of Europe), and the driver steers from the right hand side of the vehicle. The road network on the island of Great Britain is extensive, with most local and rural roads having evolved from Roman and Medieval times. Major routes developed in the mid 20th Century were made to the needs of the motor car. The high speed motorway(freeway) network was mostly constructed in the 1960s and 1970s and links together major towns and cities. The system of rail transport was invented in England and Wales, so the United Kingdom has the oldest railway network in the world. It was built mostly during the Victorian era. At the heart of the network are five long distance main lines which radiate from London to the major cities and secondary population centres with dense commuter networks within the regions. The newest part of the network connects London to the Channel Tunnel from St Pancras statio...

  8. Kingdom of Great Britain — Wikipedia Republished // WIKI 2

    wiki2.org › en › Kingdom_of_Great_Britain

    29/03/2021 · The King­dom of Great Britain, of­fi­cially called Great Britain, was a sov­er­eign state in West­ern Eu­rope from 1 May 1707 to 1 Jan­u­ary 1801.

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