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  1. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › MauveMauve - Wikipedia

    Mauve (/ ˈ m oʊ v / (), mohv; / ˈ m ɔː v / (), mawv) is a pale purple color named after the mallow flower (French: mauve).The first use of the word mauve as a color was in 1796–98 according to the Oxford English Dictionary, but its use seems to have been rare before 1859.

  2. When the Act was introduced, it did not legislate for a detailed Poor Law regime. Instead, it set up a three-man Poor Law Commission, an "at arms' length" quango to which Parliament delegated the power to make appropriate regulations, without making any provision for effective oversight of the Commission's doings.

  3. O'Shaughnessy discovered cannabis in the 1830s while living abroad in India, where he conducted numerous experiments investigating the drug's medical utility (noting in particular its analgesic and anticonvulsant effects). He returned to England with a supply of cannabis in 1842, after which its use spread through Europe and the United States.

  4. As the 1830s progressed, many of the Anti-Masonic Party's supporters joined the Whig Party, which sought to unite those opposed to the policies of President Jackson. The anti-Masons brought with them an intense distrust of politicians and a rejection of unthinking party loyalty, together with new campaign techniques to whip up excitement among the voters.

  5. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › AbbotsfordAbbotsford - Wikipedia

    Abbotsford furniture, a neo-Gothic furniture made during the 1820s and 1830s and named after Sir Walter Scott's baronial house; Abbotsford House, Scottish Borders; home of Scottish novelist Sir Walter Scott, near Melrose, Scotland; Abbotsford ware, a pottery produced by the Kirkcaldy Pottery in Fife in the late 19th. and early 20th. centuries

  6. Etymology. The coining of the word "photography" is usually attributed to Sir John Herschel in 1839. It is based on the Greek φῶς (phōs; genitive phōtos), meaning "light", and γραφή (graphê), meaning "drawing, writing", together meaning "drawing of light".

  7. The final months of the 1830s saw the proliferation of a revolutionary new technology—photography. Hence, the infant industry of photographic portraiture preserved for history a few rare, but invaluable, first images of human beings—and therefore also preserved our earliest, live peek into "fashion in action"—and its impact on everyday life and society as a whole.