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  1. The canonization of the Romanovs (also called "glorification" in the Russian Orthodox Church) was the elevation to sainthood of the last Imperial Family of Russia – Tsar Nicholas II, his wife Tsarina Alexandra, and their five children Olga, Tatiana, Maria, Anastasia, and Alexei – by the Russian Orthodox Church .

  2. We strived to take into account the act of canonization of the Royal Family by the Russian Church Abroad in 1981. As it is known, this act generated a far from a positive reaction among the Russian emigration as well as in Russia itself.

  3. Lavish celebrations were laid in July 1903 on to mark the canonization of Seraphim at his hermitage in Sarov, and the event was attended personally by the Emperor and his wife, and several other...

  4. In this article from August of 2000, the details of the canonization of the Romanov family are clearly outlined on BBC online. Due to the family’s supposed “patience and humility”, they were canonized as saints in the Orthodox Church, along with many others who faced difficulties and death during the rebellions in the early 20 th century.

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  5. The canonization of the Romanovs was the elevation to sainthood of the last Imperial Family of Russia – Tsar Nicholas II, his wife Tsarina Alexandra, and their five children Olga, Tatiana, Maria, Anastasia, and Alexei – by the Russian Orthodox Church.

  6. 15 de ago. de 2000 · The Russian Orthodox Church today announced the canonization of Russia's last czar, Nicholas II, and his immediate family for their ''humbleness, patience and meekness'' when they were imprisoned...

  7. The canonization of the Romanovs (also called "glorification" in the Russian Orthodox Church) was the elevation to sainthood of the last Imperial Family of Russia – Tsar Nicholas II, his wife Tsarina Alexandra, and their five children Olga, Tatiana, Maria, Anastasia, and Alexei – by the Russian Orthodox Church.