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  1. Frederick William, Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (German: Friedrich Wilhelm; 9 October 1771 – 16 June 1815), was a German prince and Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg and Oels. Nicknamed " The Black Duke ", he was a military officer who led the Black Brunswickers against French domination in Germany.

  2. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Charles_ICharles I - Wikipedia

    Charles I, Landgrave of Hesse-Philippsthal (1682–1770) Charles I, Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (1713–1780) Charles I, Duke of Parma (1716–1788), also Charles III of Spain; Artworks. Charles I in Three Positions, an oil painting of Charles I of England by Sir Anthony van Dyck (1635 or 1636) Charles the First (1982 painting), by American ...

  3. Francis, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld: 9. Princess Sophie Antoinette of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel: 2. King Leopold I of Belgium: 10. Heinrich XXIV, Count Reuss of Ebersdorf: 5. Countess Augusta Reuss of Ebersdorf: 11. Countess Karoline Ernestine of Erbach-Schönberg: 1. King Leopold II of Belgium: 12. Louis Philippe II, Duke of Orléans: 6. King ...

  4. Born in Weimar, he was the eldest son of Ernst August II, Duke of Saxe-Weimar and Saxe-Eisenach (Ernest Augustus II), and Duchess Anna Amalia of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel. His father died when he was only nine months old ( 28 May 1758 ), and the boy was brought up under the regency and supervision of his mother.

  5. After Prince Albrecht's death in 1906, the duke offered that he and his elder son, Prince George, would renounce their claims to the Duchy in order to allow Ernest Augustus, his only other surviving son, to take possession of the Duchy, but this option was rejected by the Bundesrat and the regency continued, this time under Duke Johann Albrecht of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, who had previously acted ...

  6. Charles Edward and his brother Henry, Cardinal Stuart, both died without legitimate issue, so the descendants of Anne Marie d'Orléans inherited the Jacobite claim, i.e. they would have inherited the British crown had it not been for the Act of Settlement, which excluded the claims of the Catholic Stuarts and d'Orléans' and settled the throne on the nearest Protestant relatives, the Hanoverians.

  7. Spouse of the British (formerly English) heir apparent. Although not granted the title in her own right, the future Mary I was, during her youth, invested by her father, Henry VIII, with many of the rights and properties traditionally given to the prince of Wales, including use of the official seal of Wales for correspondence.