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  1. 6 de dic. de 2021 · The ‘Queen Tamar and David Soslan’ play continues a series of theatrical adaptations that serve to bring Georgians and Ossetians closer together, resolve conflict and build peace. The EU, UK and UNDP supported the undertaking under their joint initiative for building confidence between conflict-divided communities, Confidence Building Early ...

  2. The ‘Queen Tamar and David Soslan’ play continues a series of theatrical adaptations that serve to bring Georgians and Ossetians closer together, resolve conflict and build peace. The EU, UK and UNDP supported the undertaking under their joint initiative for building confidence between conflict-divided communities, Confidence Building Early ...

  3. David Soslan (gürc. დავით სოსლანი , Davit Soslani ; oset. Сослан-Дауыт / Soslan-Dawyt ) — Alaniya şahzadəsi, Gürcüstan çariçası Tamaranın əri və həmkarı, feodal Gürcüstanın ən yüksək çiçəklənməsi dövründə qoşunların baş komandanı.

  4. Con la muerte de Jorge III la principal línea masculina se extinguió y la dinastía fue continuada por el matrimonio de la reina Tamar con el príncipe alano David Soslan, de reputada ascendencia bagrátida. [2] Dominio mongol

  5. David Soslan (Georgian language: დავით სოსლანი ) (died 1207) was a prince from Alania and second husband of Queen Tamar, whom he married in c. 1189. He is chiefly known for his military exploits during Georgia's wars against its Muslim neighbors. David Soslan was a member of the royal house which ruled Alania (Ovseti or Oseti in the Georgian sources; hence, the modern ...

  6. Battle of Shamkor ( Georgian: შამქორის ბრძოლა) was fought on June 1, 1195 near the city of Shamkor, Arran. The battle was a major victory won by the Georgian army, commanded by David Soslan, over the army of the Eldiguzid ruler of Nusrat al-Din Abu Bakr . The battle was fought as part of several conflicts between the ...

  7. David Soslan's status of a king consort, as well as his presence in art, on charters, and on coins, was dictated by the necessity of male aspects of kingship, but he remained a subordinate ruler who shared the throne with and derived his power from Tamar. Tamar continued to be styled as mep’et’a mep’e – "king of kings".