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  1. 07/05/2022 · Crown Prince 1882–1951: Eitel Friedrich of Prussia 1883–1942: Sophia Charlotte of Oldenburg 1879–1964: Adalbert of Prussia 1884–1948: Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen 1891–1971: August Wilhelm of Prussia 1887–1949: Alexandra Victoria of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg 1887–1957: Oskar of Prussia 1888–1958: Ina Marie von Bassewitz 1888–1973: Joachim of Prussia

  2. 13/05/2022 · Frederick II ( German: Friedrich II.; 24 January 1712 – 17 August 1786) was King in Prussia from 1740 until 1772, and King of Prussia from 1772 until his death. His most significant accomplishments include his military successes in the Silesian wars, his re-organisation of the Prussian Army, the First Partition of Poland, and his patronage of ...

    • Life
    • in Fiction
    • References

    Early life

    Duchess Ju­liana Maria of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel was born on 4 Sep­tem­ber 1729 in the town of Wolfenbüttel, the res­i­dence of the Brunswick Princes of Wolfenbüttel. She was the 11th child and 6th daugh­ter of the Aus­trian field mar­shalDuke Fer­di­nand Al­bert of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel and An­toinette Amalie of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel. After the death of his cousin and fa­ther-in-law Louis Rudolph in March 1735, Fer­di­nand Al­bert in­her­ited the Prin­ci­pal­ity of Wolfenbütteland re­signe...

    Marriage

    The mar­riage be­tween Ju­liana Maria and Fred­er­ick was arranged by Count Adam Got­t­lob von Moltke, who thought it best that the king re­mar­ried as soon as pos­si­ble, in an at­tempt of sta­bi­liz­ing his be­hav­ior. Re­port­edly, in 1751-52 the king had a wish to marry Moltke's own daugh­ter, maid-of-honor Catharine So­phie Wil­helmine von Moltke, a match Adam Got­t­lob did not wish and pre­vented by quickly hav­ing her mar­ried to Count Han­ni­bal von Wedell-Wedels­borg. The king was in...

    Queen Consort

    Queen Ju­liana Maria was de­scribed as shy, re­served and some­what stut­ter­ing when first in­tro­duced to the Dan­ish royal court as its new queen; hav­ing been given a strict ed­u­ca­tion, she sub­mit­ted to ful­fill her duty as the sec­ond queen of Fred­er­ick V and the step­mother of his chil­dren, but re­port­edly felt un­com­fort­able at the sit­u­a­tion and the pres­sure put upon her in her new role.Ju­liana Maria was per­son­ally de­scribed as good-look­ing and sen­si­ble, but the ma...

    Por­trayed in lit­er­a­ture: 1. The Lost Queen (1969, historical novel) by Norah Lofts 2. The Visit of the Royal Physician (Livläkarens besök) (1999, novel) by Per Olov Enquist Por­trayed in film: 1. The Dictator, in which she is played by Helen Haye 2. A Royal Affair, in which she is played by Trine Dyrholm

    Bibliography

    1. Bramsen, Bo (1985). Ferdinand og Caroline : en beretning om prinsen, der nødig ville være konge af Danmark [Ferdinand and Caroline: an account of the prince who was reluctant to be king of Denmark] (in Danish) (4th ed.). Copenhagen: Nordiske Landes Bogforlag. ISBN 8787439220. 2. Henrikson, Alf (1989). Dansk historia(in Swedish). (Danish history). Stockholm: Bonnier. 3. O Feldbæk (forf.); O Olsen (red.) (1990). Gyldendal og Politikens Danmarkshistorie - Den lange fred : 1700-1800(in Danish)...

    • Reign
    • Burial and Reburials
    • Relationship with Frederick II
    • Marriage and Family

    He was born in Berlin to King Fred­er­ick I of Prus­sia and Princess Sophia Char­lotte of Hanover. Dur­ing his first years, he was raised by the Huguenot gov­erness Marthe de Roucoulle. His fa­ther had suc­cess­fully ac­quired the title king for the mar­graves of Bran­den­burg. On as­cend­ing the throne in 1713 (the year be­fore his ma­ter­nal gran...

    Fred­er­ick William died in 1740 at age 51 and was in­terred at the Gar­ri­son Church in Pots­dam. Dur­ing World War II, in order to pro­tect it from ad­vanc­ing al­lied forces, Hitler or­dered the king's cof­fin, as well as those of Fred­er­ick the Great and Paul von Hin­den­burg, into hid­ing, first to Berlin and later to a salt mine out­side of ...

    His el­dest sur­viv­ing son was Fred­er­ick II (Fritz), born in 1712. Fred­er­ick William wanted him to be­come a fine sol­dier. As a small child, Fritz was awak­ened each morn­ing by the fir­ing of a can­non. At the age of 6, he was given his own reg­i­ment of chil­dren to drill as cadets, and a year later, he was given a minia­ture ar­se­nal. The...

    Fred­er­ick William mar­ried his first cousin Sophia Dorothea of Hanover, George II's younger sis­ter (daugh­ter of his uncle, King George I of Great Britain and Sophia Dorothea of Celle) on 28 No­vem­ber 1706. Fred­er­ick William was faith­ful and lov­ing to his wifebut they did not have a happy re­la­tion­ship: Sophia Dorothea feared his un­pre­d...

  3. 14/05/2022 · Maria Theresa, by the Grace of God, Dowager Empress of the Romans, Queen of Hungary, of Bohemia, of Dalmatia, of Croatia, of Slavonia, of Galicia, of Lodomeria, etc.; Archduchess of Austria; Duchess of Burgundy, of Styria, of Carinthia and of Carniola; Grand Princess of Transylvania; Margravine of Moravia; Duchess of Brabant, of Limburg, of Luxemburg, of Guelders, of Württemberg, of Upper and ...

  4. 20/05/2022 · November 8 – Elisabeth Christine of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel-Bevern, Crown Princess of Prussia (d. 1797) November 9 – Edward Bligh, 2nd Earl of Darnley, British noble (d. 1747) November 12 – Kajetan Sołtyk, Polish Catholic priest (d. 1788) November 13 – Dorothea Erxleben, first German female physician (d. 1762)

  5. 06/05/2022 · Princess Frederica of Prussia: 14 October 1799: 30 March 1800: died in childhood Prince Charles of Prussia: 29 June 1801: 21 January 1883: married Princess Marie of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (1808–1877), had issue. Princess Alexandrine of Prussia: 23 February 1803: 21 April 1892: married Paul Friedrich, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (1800–1842), had issue.