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  1. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Elizabeth_IIElizabeth II - Wikipedia

    18/06/2022 · e. Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary; born 21 April 1926) [a] is Queen of the United Kingdom and 14 other Commonwealth realms. [b] [c] Elizabeth was born in Mayfair, London, as the first child of the Duke and Duchess of York (later King George VI and Queen Elizabeth ). Her father acceded to the throne in 1936 upon the abdication of his ...

  2. 09/06/2022 · Ian Campbell, 11th Duke of Argyll. Scottish peer (1903-1973) EXCLUSIVE: Claire Foy, who won two Emmy Awards when she ascended to The Crown as Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II, is having none of it —...

  3. 14/06/2022 · Claire Foy and Paul Bettany had never met before arriving on the set of “A Very British Scandal.” But both were drawn to the three-episode limited series, which stars Foy as Margaret Campbell,...

  4. 09/06/2022 · EXCLUSIVE: Claire Foy, who gained two Emmy Awards when she ascended to The Crown as Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II, is having none of it — sympathy that’s — for Margaret Campbell, Duchess of Argyll, a society magnificence whom she portrays, to the way in which born, inside the BBC1/Amazon Prime miniseries A Very British Scandal.

    • Nos. 25–30 (Demolished).
    • No. 31, 32 and 34
    • Nos. 35 and 36
    • Nos. 37 and 38
    • Eaton House: Nos. 39 and 40.
    • Nos. 41–43.
    • Nos. 44 and 45
    • No. 46
    • No. 47.
    • No. 48.

    The whole frontage betweenPark Lane and the site of No. 31 was originally developedin the late 1720's and early 30's under an agreement withthe mason Richard Lissiman (fn. 2) to whom the houses wereleased in 1729 (Nos. 25–28) and 1732 (Nos. 29 and 30). (fn. 3) At No. 25 Lissiman's son-in-law and former apprentice,William Hale, was co-lessee. (fn. 4...

    No. 31, 32 and 34 (demolished) were erected on thecurtilage of Lord Chetwynd's mansion (later GrosvenorHouse) at No. 33, which was set back from the street with acourtyard in front (fig. 55 on page 244). Nos. 31 and 32were built in c. 1732 at Chetwynd's expense, probably bythe carpenter Benjamin Timbrell, and No. 34 under a sublease of 1731 from Ch...

    Nos. 35 and 36 (demolished) were both originally builtin c. 1735 under leases to Thomas Skeat, bricklayer, andJohn Eds, carpenter, respectively. (fn. 21) Little is known abouttheir subsequent history but No. 35 was probably eitherrebuilt or reconstructed in the later eighteenth century. In1793 it was acquired by the Hon. George Villiers but beingqu...

    Nos. 37 and 38 were rebuilt in 1911–12 as part of arange having its principal elevation in Park Street which isdescribed on page 252. When the sites were originallydeveloped by the bricklayer James Jenner in the early1730's, he built three houses here, the corner house beingentered and numbered in Park Street. (fn. 23) The latter wasrebuilt in 1825...

    This bulky, butarchitecturally small-scaled block of flats, was built in1934–6 by Edifis Limited of Grosvenor Road, Pimlico(described in directories as wharfingers). (fn. 25) The jobarchitect was S. C. Macey, the front elevation, however,being designed by Wimperis, Simpson and Guthrie. (fn. 26) This they originally intended to be of brick with ston...

    These three houses have stone-facedelevations in a restrained classical style, designed to 'read'as a single composition and provided by Turner Lord andCompany in 1912–14. (fn. 37)But at each house the client wasdifferent, and only No. 41 was totally rebuilt. This house, the widest of the three, was originallyerected under a sub-lease of 1731 to th...

    Nos. 44 and 45 were both erected under leases ofNovember 1727 to William Draycott esquire of St.James's, Westminster, but were probably built by CharlesGriffith, carpenter, who was a party to the leases. No. 44was first occupied in 1731 and No. 45 in 1732. (fn. 59)They havevirtually identical three-bay brick fronts with segmentalheaded windows (len...

    No. 46 is a nine-storey block of flats erected in 1937–9by Marais Construction Limited to the designs of FernandBillerey (fn. 68) (Plate 31c). It has a red-brick and Portland-stone front of minimal neo-Georgian character, for whichthe elevation was personally approved by the secondDuke. (fn. 69)At the back of the main building, but linked to it,is ...

    The structural core of this thoroughlyEdwardianised house is a rebuilding of the 1820's. Itreplaced the original early-Georgian house erected under alease of 1728 to the bricklayer Robert Phillips, and firstoccupied in 1732. (fn. 74) Like the still-surviving and equallynarrow house built by Phillips at No. 48, it was plannedwith a central toplit st...

    This house, built in 1727–9 by the bricklayerRobert Phillips, (fn. 86)has the best-preserved early-Georgianfront in Upper Grosvenor Street (Plate 62a). The interior,on the other hand, though little altered in plan, containsvirtually no original features. The house was purchased by its future first occupant,Colonel William Hanmer, while still in the...

  5. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Ham_HouseHam House - Wikipedia

    19/06/2022 · The eldest daughter of Elizabeth and Lionel, also named Elizabeth (1659–1735), married Archibald Campbell, 1st Duke of Argyll in Edinburgh in 1678. Their first child, John Campbell, 2nd Duke of Argyll , was born at Ham House in 1680; [59] their second son, Archibald Campbell, 3rd Duke of Argyll was born there a few years later.