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  1. Frances Villiers, Countess of Jersey (née Twysden; 25 February 1753 – 23 July 1821) was a British courtier and Lady of the Bedchamber, one of the more notorious of the many mistresses of King George IV when he was Prince of Wales, "a scintillating society woman, a heady mix of charm, beauty, and sarcasm".

    • Frances Twysden, 25 February 1753, London, England
    • Philip Twysden, Frances Carter
  2. She married George Child Villiers, 5th Earl of Jersey, on 23 May 1804, in the drawing room of her house in Berkeley Square. Her husband's mother, Frances Villiers, Countess of Jersey (also Lady Jersey), was one of the more notorious mistresses of King George IV when he was Prince of Wales.

    • Lady Sarah Sophia Fane, 4 March 1785
    • Osterley Park
    • 7
  3. Women who have held the title include: Barbara Chiffinch, Countess of Jersey (1663-1735), from 1716, widow of Edward Villiers, 1st Earl of Jersey. Anne Russell, Duchess of Bedford, afterwards Countess of Jersey (c.1705 - 1762) Frances Villiers, Countess of Jersey (1753-1821)

  4. Edward Villiers, 1st Earl of Jersey (16561711), Elizabeth Hamilton, Countess of Orkney (1657-1733) Mary (1670-1753), who married William O'Brien, 3rd Earl of Inchiquin , and had children

  5. Frances Villiers, Countess of Jersey (25 February 1753 - 25 July 1821), was an influential member of Georgian society and a mistress of George IV. An Irish beauty Frances Twysden was born on 25 February 1753 in Raphoe, Donegal, in Ireland, the posthumous daughter of Philip Twysden, the bankrupt Bishop of Raphoe, and his second wife, Frances.

  6. But Frances Villiers, Countess of Jersey, is probably best remembered for her affair with George, Prince of Wales, later George IV. George IV Apparently the amorous 20 year old prince tried his luck with Frances in 1782, but she turned him down, making him wait more than ten years before granting him her favours.

  7. 7 de ago. de 2021 · George appointed his latest mistress Frances Villiers, Countess of Jersey, as Lady of Caroline’s Royal Bedchamber, and did not bother to inform Caroline of Charlotte’s tragic death in childbirth in November 1817.