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  1. Francis Wayles Eppes (September 20, 1801 – May 30, 1881) was a planter and slave owner from Virginia who became a cotton planter in the Florida Territory and later civic leader in Tallahassee and surrounding Leon County, Florida.

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    • James A. Berthelot
  2. Francis Wayles Eppes (September 20, 1801 - May 30, 1881) was the only surviving child of Thomas Jefferson's daughter Maria Jefferson Eppes and her husband, John Wayles Eppes, Jefferson's nephew by marriage. Six months before Francis was born, Thomas Jefferson took the oath of office as the third president of the United States.

  3. 26 de abr. de 2022 · http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_W._Eppes. Francis Wayles Eppes VII (September 20, 1801 – May 10, 1881) was the grandson of President Thomas Jefferson. After moving from Virginia with his family to near Tallahassee, Florida in 1829, he established a cotton plantation.

    • Bermuda Place, Virginia
    • Mary Elizabeth Eppes, Susan Margaret Eppes
    • Virginia
    • September 20, 1801
  4. The Francis Eppes Plantation was a cotton plantation of 1,920 acres (8 km 2) situated in east-central Leon County, Florida, United States and established by Francis W. Eppes in 1829.

  5. 4 de mar. de 2002 · Francis Wayles Eppes (1801–81) was the only surviving child of TJ’s daughter Maria Jefferson Eppes and his wife’s nephew John Wayles Eppes. After the death of his mother in 1804, Eppes spent much of his time at Monticello, where TJ sought to inspire in him a love of learning. Eppes was educated at various private schools, including New ...

  6. Francis Wayles Eppes (September 20, 1801 - 1881) was the only surviving child of Jefferson's daughter Maria Jefferson Eppes and his wife's nephew John Wayles Eppes. Thomas Jefferson had taken the oath of office as the third president on March 4, 1801.

  7. The Eppes Statue is a monument of Francis W. Eppes that is located in Tallahassee, Florida. The bronze sculpture sits in front of the Westcott Building on Florida State University's campus. It was commissioned by FSU president Sandy D'Alemberte to honor one of Florida State University's founders.