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  1. Frederick ( Middle High German: Friderich, [1] Standard German: Friedrich; 21 September 1371 – 20 September 1440) was the last Burgrave of Nuremberg from 1397 to 1427 (as Frederick VI ), Margrave of Brandenburg-Ansbach from 1398, Margrave of Brandenburg-Kulmbach from 1420, and Elector of Brandenburg (as Frederick I) from 1415 until his death.

    • Overview
    • Early years of reconstruction.

    Frederick William, (born Feb. 16, 1620, Cölln, near Berlin—died May 9, 1688, Potsdam, near Berlin), elector of Brandenburg (1640–88), who restored the Hohenzollern dominions after the devastations of the Thirty Years’ War—centralizing the political administration, reorganizing the state finances, rebuilding towns and cities, developing a strong army, and acquiring clear sovereignty over ducal Prussia. All these measures contributed to the foundation of the future Prussian monarchy.

    Frederick William was the eldest son of the elector George William and Elizabeth Charlotte of the Palatinate, a granddaughter of William the Silent, prince of Orange.

    When Frederick William, completely inexperienced in politics, succeeded his father as elector in December 1640, he took over a ravaged land occupied by foreign troops. Under his father’s powerful favourite, Graf Adam von Schwarzenberg, Brandenburg had changed sides from the Swedes to the Habsburgs and had thus been drawn into the struggle on both sides. Residing until 1643 not in Brandenburg, the heartland of his domain, but rather in Königsberg (now Kaliningrad, Russia), the capital of the remote Duchy of Prussia, the Elector at first pursued a policy of cautious neutrality in order to escape the pressure of the rival powers. He discharged the Brandenburg troops in the service of the Habsburg emperor and concluded an armistice with Sweden.

    He soon recognized, however, that without an army he could never become master in his own house. In 1644, at the beginning of negotiations to conclude the Thirty Years’ War, he had already started to organize his own military force. Though his army was small, Brandenburg could not support it without requisitioning funds from the Duchy of Cleves, in the west, and from the Duchy of Prussia. For the first time Brandenburg’s territories, united only by their allegiance to the person of the Elector, were drawn together for a political purpose. The standing army was the first institution used by the increasingly absolutist rulers of Brandenburg to combat the privileges of the estates of the individual territories. It was never entirely disbanded and became the core of the 18th-century Prussian army.

    This army was not big enough to allow Frederick William to conduct an independent foreign policy. Moreover, his marriage in 1646 to Louise Henriette of Orange failed to bring the anticipated Dutch support. Lacking the support of friendly great powers at the peace congress of Westphalia in 1648, he did not attain his aim of acquiring all of Pomerania, with the Oder estuary and the important harbour of Stettin (since 1945 Szczecin). He had to be content with eastern Pomerania, the secularized dioceses of Minden and Halberstadt, and the promise of the archbishopric of Magdeburg, all of which were, however, important as links to his western German possessions.

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    After seven years of peaceful reconstruction, Frederick William saw his political and military ability put to a difficult test with the outbreak of the First Northern War (1655–60). By invading Poland, King Charles X Gustav of Sweden sought to expand the power in the Baltic that Sweden gained by the Peace of Westphalia. Frederick William, as duke of Prussia, owed fealty to the Polish king, but, when offered an alliance by Sweden in return for control over the East Prussian ports, the Elector chose armed neutrality. When Charles Gustav rapidly overran Poland and advanced against East Prussia, Frederick William had to exchange Polish for Swedish suzerainty and provide armed support to Charles Gustav. In the three-day Battle of Warsaw in July 1656, the untried army of Brandenburg, under the Elector’s command, passed its test of fire. To keep the Elector on his side, the Swedish king granted him full sovereignty over the Duchy of Prussia. This did not prevent Frederick William, when Sweden’s military position deteriorated, from entering into negotiations with Poland, which now renounced suzerainty over East Prussia. With his new allies, Poland and the Habsburg emperor, the Elector drove the Swedes from western Pomerania. French intervention, however, forced Frederick William once again to give up his Pomeranian conquests. Ratified in the Treaty of Oliva in 1660, this renunciation was balanced by confirmation of the Elector’s full sovereignty over the Duchy of Prussia.

  2. Frederick I of Ansbach and Bayreuth (also known as Frederick V; German: Friedrich V. von Brandenburg-Ansbach-Kulmbach or Friedrich der Ältere; 8 May 1460 – 4 April 1536) was born at Ansbach as the eldest son of Albert III, Margrave of Brandenburg by his second wife Anna, daughter of Frederick II, Elector of Saxony.

  3. Frederick I, elector of Brandenburg from 1417, founder of the Brandenburg line of Hohenzollern. He was the second son of Frederick V, burgrave of Nürnberg. After his father’s death, in 1398, he obtained Ansbach and, in 1420, on the death of his elder brother John, the principality of Bayreuth.

    • The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica
  4. Frederick I Friedrich I: 21 September 1371 30 April 1415 – 20 September 1440 20 September 1440 Electorate of Brandenburg: Elisabeth of Bavaria-Landshut 18 September 1401 ten children Originally Burgrave of Nuremberg as Frederick VI. Appointed by King Sigismund in 1415 and enfeoffed in 1417. 1417–1426: Margraviate of Brandenburg

  5. "Frederick of Brandenburg (Berlin, December 12, 1530 – Halberstadt October 2, 1552) was Prince-Archbishop of Magdeburg and Administrator of the Prince-Bishopric of Halberstadt." - (en.wikipedia.org 05.04.2020) gnd viaf wikidata Wikipedia Relationships with persons or entities via objects