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  1. 03/06/2022 · George FitzRoy, 1st Earl of Northumberland, an illegitimate son of king Charles II, was created Duke of Northumberland in the Peerage of England in 1683. He had already been created Baron of Pontefract, Viscount Falmouth and Earl of Northumberland in 1674, also in the Peerage of England.

  2. 18/06/2022 · Charles Lennox, 1st Duke of Richmond: 1672–1723 1681 486 William Hamilton, Duke of Hamilton: 1635–1708 1682 487 Prince George of Denmark: 1653–1708 1684 488 Charles Seymour, 6th Duke of Somerset: 1662–1748 1684 489 George FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Northumberland: 1665–1716 1684

  3. 14/06/2022 · Charlecote is a village and civil parish 5 miles (8.0 km) south of Warwick, on the River Avon, in the Stratford-on-Avon district, in the county of Warwickshire, England. In 2011 the parish had a population of 194. The parish touches Wasperton, Newbold Pacey, Wellesbourne and Walton, Stratford-upon-Avon, Loxley and Hampton Lucy.

    • Introduction
    • The Honor of Grafton 1541-1660
    • The Honor of Grafton, 1660-1705
    • The Wakefield Lodge Estate, 1706-1811
    • The Wakefield Lodge Estate, 1811-1918
    • The End of A Great Estate

    In 1542 a number of Crown estates in the hundred of Cleley and elsewhere inNorthamptonshire and Buckinghamshire were combined by Act of Parliament tobecome the honor of Grafton, centred on the manor of that name, which becameknown as Grafton Regis and where the existing manor house was greatly enlarged.Somewhat reduced by grants and sales, the hono...

    The Act of 1541 (fn. 3) declared that from the following year the manor of Grafton(which, together with Hartwell, had been in Crown hands since 1527) (fn. 4)should beerected into an honor and should have a number of other estates annexed to it. InNorthamptonshire these included the hundreds of Wymersley and Hamfordshoe,the forests of Whittlewood an...

    Although sales in the honor, as elsewhere, during the Interregnum were declaredvoid after the Restoration, officials faced other problems in the early 1660s, aspetitions flooded in from a variety of individuals, prominent and obscure, seekingthe rewewal of grants of lands or offices and the repayment of loans said to havebeen secured on the honor. ...

    Queen Catherine finally died on New Year's Eve 1705 (fn. 106) and thus the honor ofGrafton passed to the 2nd duke of Grafton, who had tried unsuccessfully to buyout the queen's interest three years before. (fn. 107) Grafton House and the demesnes,however, remained in the hands of his mother and her second husband. In fact,Duchess Isabella seems to ...

    Among the first tasks facing the 4th duke was to deal with the loss of the incomefrom prizage of wines granted to the 1st duke by Charles II. (fn. 129) In 1785 and again in1797 the government was urged to revest the income in the Crown but not until1803 was an Act passed enabling this to be done. (fn. 130) In 1806 the 3rd duke received anannuity of...

    Although some improvement in rents on the estate is discernible after 1900, (fn. 185) the7th duke's advisers evidently felt that a reduction in acreage to release capital wasdesirable and in 1913 some 2,120 acres were put up for auction, described, as sooften in such cases, as 'outlying portions' of the estate. While this could reasonablybe said of...

    • Early Life, Civil War and Exile
    • Restoration
    • Foreign Policy and Marriage
    • Conflict with Parliament
    • Science
    • Later Years
    • Legacy
    • Titles, Styles, Honours and Arms
    • Issue
    • Bibliography

    Charles II was born at St James's Palace on 29 May 1630. His parents were Charles I, who ruled the three kingdoms of England, Scotland and Ireland, and Henrietta Maria, the sister of the French king Louis XIII. Charles was their second child. Their first son was born about a year before Charles, but died within a day. England, Scotland, and Ireland...

    After the death of Cromwell in 1658, Charles's initial chances of regaining the Crown seemed slim; Cromwell was succeeded as Lord Protector by his son, Richard. However, the new Lord Protector had little experience of either military or civil administration. In 1659, the Rump Parliament was recalled and Richard resigned. During the civil and milita...

    Since 1640, Portugal had been fighting a war against Spain to restore its independence after a dynastic union of sixty years between the crowns of Spain and Portugal. Portugal had been helped by France, but in the Treaty of the Pyrenees in 1659 Portugal was abandoned by its French ally. Negotiations with Portugal for Charles's marriage to Catherine...

    Although previously favourable to the Crown, the Cavalier Parliament was alienated by the king's wars and religious policies during the 1670s. In 1672, Charles issued the Royal Declaration of Indulgence, in which he purported to suspend all penal laws against Catholics and other religious dissenters. In the same year, he openly supported Catholic F...

    In Charles II's early childhood, William Cavendish, Earl of Newcastle was governor of the royal household and Brian Duppa, the Dean of Christchurch, was his tutor. Neither man thought that the study of science subjects was appropriate for a future king, and Newcastle even advised against studying any subject too seriously. However, as Charles grew ...

    Charles faced a political storm over his brother James, a Catholic, being next in line to the throne. The prospect of a Catholic monarch was vehemently opposed by Anthony Ashley Cooper, 1st Earl of Shaftesbury (previously Baron Ashley and a member of the Cabal, which had fallen apart in 1673). Shaftesbury's power base was strengthened when the Hous...

    The escapades of Charles after his defeat at the Battle of Worcesterremained important to him throughout his life. He delighted and bored listeners with tales of his escape for many years. Numerous accounts of his adventures were published, particularly in the immediate aftermath of the Restoration. Though not averse to his escape being ascribed to...

    Titles and styles

    The official style of Charles II was "Charles the Second, by the Grace of God, King of England, Scotland, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, etc." The claim to France was only nominal, and had been asserted by every English monarch since Edward III, regardless of the amount of French territory actually controlled.

    Honours

    1. KG: Knight of the Garter, 21 May 1638

    Arms

    Charles's coat of arms as Prince of Wales was the royal arms (which he later inherited), differenced by a label of three points Argent. His arms as monarch were: Quarterly, I and IV Grandquarterly, Azure three fleurs-de-lis Or (for France) and Gules three lions passant guardant in pale Or (for England); II Or a lion rampant within a double tressure flory-counter-flory Gules (for Scotland); III Azure a harp Or stringed Argent (for Ireland).

    By Lucy Walter(c. 1630 – 1658): 1. James Crofts, later Scott (1649–1685), created Duke of Monmouth (1663) in England and Duke of Buccleuch(1663) in Scotland. Monmouth was born nine months after Walter and Charles II first met, and was acknowledged as his son by Charles II, but James II suggested that he was the son of another of her lovers, Colonel...

    BBC staff (October 2003), Charles II and the women who bore his children (PDF), BBC
    "Nova et Vetera", British Medical Journal, 2 (4064): 1089, 1938, doi:10.1136/bmj.2.4064.1089, JSTOR 20301497, PMC 2210948, PMID 20781915
  4. 13/06/2022 · 1918 New Year Honours (MC) This is a list of Military Crosses awarded in the 1918 New Year Honours . The 1918 New Year Honours were appointments by King George V to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of the British Empire. The appointments were published in The London Gazette and The Times in January, February ...