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  1. hace 2 días · Constructed with stone after the first, built of wood, was destroyed by fire in 1880. Also of note on the Parliament Square site is the Old Education Building constructed in 1816 of stone with two more floors added in 1869. The Departmental building was completed in 1888. Marysville Cotton Mill.

  2. 13/06/2022 · The UA dean’s and president’s lists recognize full-time undergraduate students. The lists do not apply to graduate students or undergraduate students who take less than a full course load.

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    No. 1 as it now stands is in elevation a substantialsimplification, following war damage, of the house rebuiltin 1908 (Plate 31a). The first house here, leased in May1728, was modest and conventional. (fn. 4) Internal photographstaken shortly after the builder George Shaw had altered itfor Lady Hotham in 1889 suggest a thoroughly Victorianized hous...

    No. 2, like its eastern neighbour, was rebuilt early in thetwentieth century as a high-class speculation. It replaced ahouse of good size and quality with a thirty-foot frontage,first leased in 1730. (fn. 9) At the time of its demolition thestaircase, probably still in its original front-compartmentposition, was described as 'very handsome', and th...

    No. 3 is a narrow-fronted house of which little is known(Plate 31a). In carcase it is still the original building leasedin 1730 to John Neale, carpenter, (fn. 12) but it has undergonemuch alteration. By the early nineteenth century theground-floor plan was notable for the rather grand ifuneconomic arrangement by which a central entrance ledinto a h...

    No. 4, with No. 5, makes a pair of substantial housesleased to David Audsley, plasterer, in 1730 (fn. 16) (Plates 31a,55c). Both houses at first sported similar fronts of just overthirty feet in breadth, while within they had frontcompartment staircases, and at the back shared a privatestable yard. (fn. 13) The main cornices continue to align, but ...

    No. 5 was, like No. 4, leased to David Audsley, plasterer,in 1730. (fn. 21) Though its front has been less altered than itsneighbour's, it too has received a stuccoed ground storey,stucco surrounds to the windows, and a late-Georgian ironbalcony at first-floor level (Plates 31a, 55c). Despiteexpenditure of £2,000 in 1875, the internal planning hasn...

    No. 6 consists now of a small but arresting block of flatsof 1936, with an elevation and ironwork in a sub-modernidiom. It was erected by Prestige and Company to designsby W. E. Masters, (fn. 25)and superseded a house of specialinterest to which detailed attention must be given (Plates55c, 56: see also Plate 17d, fig. 8a in vol. XXXIX). The main re...

    No. 7 is an unassuming brick house which, like No. 8,was leased to Edward Cock, carpenter, in 1732 (fn. 44) (Plate55c). The plasterer John Shepherd was party to the lease,Cock and he being much involved in development aroundthe then Shepherd's Court (now Place). The plot of No. 7included a narrow strip of ground stretching behind No. 8to Shepherd's...

    No. 8, again leased in 1732 by consent of John Shepherdto Edward Cock, carpenter, (fn. 46) is a small affair, only sixteenfeet in width and about forty in depth, and with two roomson each floor (Plate 55c). Despite many alterations it haskept something of its original appearance. In 1955, duringa conversion for Hammerson Estates Limited, the frontd...

    Nos. 9, 10 and 10A, together with Nos. 1 and 3Shepherd's Place, now form a group of brick houses withbow windows, somewhat lower than the surroundingbuildings. They were erected in 1937–8 in a reticent neo-Georgian style by the builders Gee, Walker and Slater todesigns by Wimperis, Simpson and Guthrie. (fn. 48)No. 10Astands at the rear of the site ...

    No. 11, a house of only fifteen feet in frontage but fulldepth to Lees Place, was originally leased in 1732. (fn. 56) Itsattractions were modest, for in 1814–15 an attempt by itstenant, Mrs. Augusta de Crespigny, to sell her twenty-oneyear interest for £2,000 proved unsuccessful, and she wasreduced to letting the house by the year to 'a taylor and ...

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    Adam and Eve Chamber100 Adam and Eve Stairs99, 100, 221 Admiralty112, 113 "Agas"map 116 Agnew, William Lockett 194 Ailesbury, Thomas, Earl of 36, 93 n. Ailsa, Archibald, Marquess of (Earl ofCassilis) 211, 213 Air Ministry223 Alard, Archdeacon of London 3 n. Albemarle, Arnold Joast Van Keppel,1st Earl of 180, 181, 186 Albemarle, George, Duke of 34, ...

    Backstairs, King's 77, 78, 79 n. — Queen's68, 69 Bankes, Henry 207 Banks, John 228 Banqueting House(1607–19) 27, 37, 118–121 Banqueting House erected for wedding ofPrincess Elizabeth27, 61, 66 Banqueting House, "new" 244 Banqueting House (present)39, 41, 116–139, Pl. 4 (a and b), 16–3745 (b) -, ceiling62, 63 n., 127–129, 132–133,Pl. 38–43 -, Inigo ...

    Cabinet, Offices of the 198, 204, 208 Cabinet Room28, 29, 98, 99 Cadogan, Charles 2nd Baron 150 Cadogan, Hon. Charles Sloane, 1st EarlCadogan 146, 149, 150 Cadogan House141, 145–151, 173, Pl. 52 (b), 53 (a) Caermarthen, Marquess of 107 n. Calvert, Charles 46 n. Cambridge, James, Duke of 97 Camera, Walter de, Emma, wife of 12 n. Campbell, Colin 167,...

    Dada, Father, papal nuntio 106 n. Dalton, Mr. 145 Danby, Earl of 42 Danish church in Wellclose Square109, 110 Darcy, Colonel 152 Darcy, Conyers, 2nd Earl of Holderness 190 n Darcy, Sir Conyers 157 n., 190 Darcy, Mrs. 145, 152, 160, 162 Darcy, Robert, 3rd Earl of Holderness152, 157 n. D'arsy, Duke 37 Davenant, William 63 Dawkins, Richard 184 Decritz...

    Earl Marshal's Office161 Eating Room, King's 76 n., 77, 78 n. -, — Queen's 69, 104 Eden, Hon. Fred. 158 Edward I5 Edward IV6 Edward VI20, 22, 67, 88 Edward VII125, 222 Effingham, Lady Dowager 190 n. Egmont, Earl of 155 Elizabeth, Princess, wedding of27, 54, 55, 61, 62, 65, 135 Elizabeth, Queen 23, 24, 25, 116, 118 Ellice, Alexander 254 Ellice, Edwa...

    Faithfull, Geo. 206 Faithfull, Son and Coode 206 Falmouth, Anne Frances, Countess of(néeBankes) 206, 207 Fane Room, seeVane Room. Fanshawe, Lady 236, 237 Fanshawe, Lord 236 Faringestone, Margery of 13 n. Farquhar, Sir Robert Townshend 251, 253 Farquhar, Sir Walter 253 Fauconberg, Lady (néeMary Cromwell) 33 Fauconberg, Thomas, Earl of 33 Fauconbridg...

    Gage, Henry, 4th Viscount 155, 156 Gage, Henry Charles, 5th Viscount 156 Gage, Hon. Henry Edward Hall 156 Gainsborough, 2nd Earl of 187 n. Gallery, low, by the orchard 20 -, —, low, in the garden 20 -, —, nether 20 -, —, next the Thames 20 -, —, under the banquet chamber 116 -, see alsoBoarded Gallery; LongGallery; Matted Gallery; NewGallery; Privy...

  3. 30/05/2022 · Informació acadèmica a tercers Es demana, també, autorització per a que entre el tutor o, en el seu defecte, qualsevol representant de l'Institut Poblenou, i els pares es faciliti informació sobre el progrés, resultats, faltes d'assistència i, en general, qualsevol circumstància que considerin rellevant durant l'estada al centre

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