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  1. 11 de ene. de 2023 · Maria of Russia 1819–1876: Maximilian Duke of Leuchtenberg 1817–1852 r.1835–1852: Peter of Oldenburg 1812–1881: Olga of Baden 1839–1891: Michael of Russia 1832–1909: Maria Alexandrovna 1824–1880: Alexander II Emp. of Russia 1818–1881 r.1855–1881: Catherine Dolgorukov 1847–1922: Nicholas of Russia 1831–1891: Alexandra of Oldenburg 1838–1900: Alexandra of Russia

  2. 17 de ene. de 2023 · Maria Alexandrovna was the one to start the tradition of coronation in “ a Russian-style dress ”. Following in her footsteps , Empress Maria Fedorovna, the wife of Alexander III and mother of...

  3. Hace 1 día · Marie (born Princess Marie Alexandra Victoria of Edinburgh; 29 October 1875 – 18 July 1938) [note 1] was the last Queen of Romania as the wife of King Ferdinand I . Marie was born into the British royal family. Her parents were Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh (later Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha) and Grand Duchess Maria Alexandrovna of Russia.

    • Early Life
    • Education
    • First Marriage
    • Swedish Princess
    • World War I, Revolution and Second Marriage
    • Exile
    • in The United States
    • Last Years

    Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna was born 18 April [O.S. 6 April] 1890 in Saint Petersburg. She was the first child and only daughter of Grand Duke Paul Alexandrovich of Russia and his first wife, Grand Duchess Alexandra Georgievna of Russia, born Princess Alexandra of Greece and Denmark. The baby was named after her late paternal grandmother, the Empr...

    In 1895, Grand Duke Paul began an affair with a married woman, Olga Valerianova Pistolkors. He was able to obtain a divorce for her and he eventually married Olga in 1902, while the couple was staying abroad. As they had married defying Nicholas II’s opposition, the Tsar forbade them to return to Russia. Left fatherless, twelve-year-old Maria and e...

    During the next two years, Maria’s aunt turned towards religion and charity work. Planning to retire from court and to form a religious order, Grand Duchess Elisabeth decided to find a husband for her niece. Shortly after Easter 1907, Prince Wilhelm, Duke of Södermanland the second son of King Gustav V of Sweden and Victoria of Baden visited St Pet...

    After a honeymoon in Germany, Italy and France, the newlyweds went to Sweden, where an official ceremonial reception awaited them with the state flags of Russia and Sweden waving in Stockholm. In the beginning, the marriage looked successful. The couple set up their home in the Swedish countryside in the province of Södermanland. They spent the sum...

    At the outbreak of the war, Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna trained as a nurse. With Princess Helen of Serbia, the grand duchess was sent to the northern front, at Instenburg in East Prussia, under command of General Paul von Rennenkampf. For bravery under airplane fire, she was awarded the St George medal. In 1915, after the Russian withdrawal from E...

    In December 1918, Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna and her second husband arrived in Bucharest staying at a local hotel. In January 1919, they were given private apartments at the Cotroceni Palace as guests of the Romanian Queen. Tragic news came from Russia. The following month, Maria Pavlovna learned that her father, Grand Duke Paul Alexandrovich, ha...

    Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna's arrival in New York City was greeted by the press with great enthusiasm and curiosity. She was photographed and interviewed a great deal. Accompanied by an American friend, she went as far as California spending three weeks in a ranch. In January 1929, while recuperating from an ankle injury she worked on her memoirs ...

    In Argentina, Maria Pavlovna rented a small house with a garden in the barrio Norte in Buenos Aires and devoted her spare time to painting, even managing to sell several of her works. Argentinian newspapers published her articles about interior design, fashion, and art. The cosmetic line did not take off, but Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna remained i...

    • Appearance and Personality
    • Early Life
    • Engagements and Marriage
    • Tsarevna
    • Empress of Russia
    • Empress Dowager
    • Revolution and Exile
    • Death and Burial
    • Legacy
    • Honours

    Dag­mar was known for her beauty. Princess Mary Ade­laide of Cam­bridge said that Dag­mar was "sweetly pretty" and com­mented fa­vor­ably on her "splen­did dark eyes." Her fi­ancee Tsare­vich Nicholas Alexan­drovich was en­thu­si­as­tic about her beauty. He wrote to his mother that "she is even pret­tier in real life than in the por­traits that we ...

    Princess Marie So­phie Fred­erikke Dag­mar was born on 26 No­vem­ber 1847 at her par­ents' res­i­dence in the Yel­low Man­sion, an 18th-cen­tury town house at 18 Amal­ie­gade, which is lo­cated im­me­di­ately ad­ja­cent to the Amalien­borg Palace com­plex, the prin­ci­pal res­i­dence of the Dan­ish royal fam­ily in the dis­trict of Fred­eriksstaden...

    First engagement

    At the end of 1863, as the daugh­ter and sis­ter of the kings of Den­mark and Greece and sis­ter-in-law of the Prince of Wales, Dag­mar was now con­sid­ered one of Eu­rope's most cov­eted princesses. She re­ceived a pro­posal from Crown Prince Um­berto of Italy, but was re­luc­tant to marry him be­cause she found him un­at­trac­tive. Her mother was also re­luc­tant to sup­port such a mar­riage as she saw a greater sta­tus in the prospect of Dag­mar mar­ry­ing into the Russ­ian im­pe­r­ial fam...

    Second engagement and marriage

    Alexan­der II of Rus­sia and Maria Alexan­drovna had grown fond of Dag­mar, and they wanted her to marry their new heir, Tsare­vich Alexan­der. In an af­fec­tion­ate let­ter, Alexan­der II told Dag­mar that he hoped she would still con­sider her­self a mem­ber of their family. Maria Alexan­drovna tried to con­vince Louise of Hesse-Kas­sel to send Dag­mar to Rus­sia im­me­di­ately, but Louise in­sisted that Dag­mar must "strengthen her nerves... [and] avoid emo­tional upsets." Dag­mar, who sin...

    Maria Feodor­ovna was beloved by the Russ­ian pub­lic. Early on, she made it a pri­or­ity to learn the Russ­ian lan­guage and to try to un­der­stand the Russ­ian peo­ple. Baroness Rah­den wrote that "the Czarevna is form­ing a real, warm sym­pa­thy for that coun­try which is re­ceiv­ing her with so much enthusiasm." In 1876, she and her hus­band vi...

    On the morn­ing of 13 March 1881, Maria's fa­ther-in-law Alexan­der II of Rus­sia was killed by a bomb on the way back to the Win­ter Palace from a mil­i­tary pa­rade. In her diary, she de­scribed how the wounded, still liv­ing Em­peror was taken to the palace: "His legs were crushed ter­ri­bly and ripped open to the knee; a bleed­ing mass, with ha...

    On 1 No­vem­ber 1894, Alexan­der III died aged just 49 at Li­va­dia. In her diary Maria wrote, "I am ut­terly heart­bro­ken and de­spon­dent, but when I saw the bliss­ful smile and the peace in his face that came after, it gave me strength." Two days later, the Prince and Princess of Wales ar­rived at Li­va­dia from Lon­don. While the Prince of Wal...

    Rev­o­lu­tion came to Rus­sia in 1917, first with the Feb­ru­ary Rev­o­lu­tion, then with Nicholas II's ab­di­ca­tion on 15 March. After trav­el­ling from Kiev to meet with her de­posed son, Nicholas II, in Mogilev, Maria re­turned to the city, where she quickly re­alised how Kiev had changed and that her pres­ence was no longer wanted. She was per...

    In No­vem­ber 1925, Maria's favourite sis­ter, Queen Alexan­dra, died. That was the last loss that she could bear. "She was ready to meet her Cre­ator," wrote her son-in-law, Grand Duke Alexan­der Mikhailovich, about Dowa­ger Em­press Maria's last years. On 13 Oc­to­ber 1928 at Hvidøre near Copen­hagen, in a house she had once shared with her sis­t...

    The Dag­marinkatu street in Töölö, Helsinki, and the Maria Hos­pi­tal, which also pre­vi­ously op­er­ated in Helsinki, are named after Em­press Maria Feodorovna. In the 1997 Amer­i­can an­i­mated film Anas­ta­sia, di­rected by Don Bluth and Gary Gold­man, Maria Feodor­ovna is voiced by An­gela Lans­bury.

    Mexican Empire: Grand Cross of the Imperial Order of Saint Charles, 10 April 1865
    Kingdom of Portugal: Dame 1st Class of the Order of Queen Saint Isabel, 25 May 1881
    Kingdom of Prussia: Dame 1st Class of the Order of Louise
  4. Hace 1 día · Contents move to sidebar (Top) 1 Early life 1.1 Birth and family background 1.2 Childhood 2 Tsesarevich 3 Engagement and marriage 4 Accession and reign 4.1 Coronation 4.2 Ecclesiastical affairs 4.3 Initiatives in foreign affairs 4.4 Russo-Japanese War 4.4.1 Tsar's confidence in victory 4.5 Anti-Jewish pogroms of 1903–1906 4.6 Bloody Sunday (1905)