Yahoo Search Búsqueda en la Web

  1. Cerca de 2.090.000 resultados de búsqueda

  1. Grand Duchess Olga Pavlovna of Russia ( Russian: Ольга Павловна; 22 July [ O.S. 11 July] 1792 – 26 January [ O.S. 15 January] 1795) was a Grand Duchess of Russia as the second youngest daughter and seventh child of the Tsarevich of Russia (later Emperor Paul I) and his consort, Sophie Dorothea of Württemberg .

  2. Olga Pavlovna was a Grand Duchess of Russia as the second youngest daughter and seventh child of Emperor Paul I of Russia and his empress consort, Sophie Dorothea of Württemberg.

  3. When Grand Duchess Olga Pavlovna of Russia was born on 11 July 1792, in Pushkin, Leningrad, Russia, Soviet Union, her father, Paul I of Russia, was 37 and her mother, Empress Consort Maria Feodorovna von Holstein-Gottorp-Romanov ,Gertsogynea von Württemberg, was 32. She died on 15 January 1795, in Saint Petersburg, Russian Empire, at the age of 2.

  4. Grand Duchess Olga Alexandrovna of Russia ( Russian: О́льга Алекса́ндровна; 13 June [ O.S. 1 June] 1882 – 24 November 1960) was the youngest child of Emperor Alexander III of Russia and younger sister of Emperor Nicholas II . Olga was raised at the Gatchina Palace outside Saint Petersburg.

    • Family and Early Life
    • Engagement and Marriage
    • Private Life
    • Social Work
    • Evangelika Controversy
    • Widowhood
    • World War I
    • First Exile
    • Regency
    • Second Exile and Death

    Olga was born at Pavlovsk Palace near Saint Petersburg on 3 September [O.S. 22 August] 1851. She was the second child and elder daughter of Grand Duke Constantine Nikolaievich and his wife, Grand Duchess Alexandra, a former princess of Saxe-Altenburg. Through her father, Olga was a granddaughter of Tsar Nicholas I, a niece of Tsar Alexander II and ...

    The young King George I of Greece visited Russia in 1863 to thank Olga's uncle Tsar Alexander IIfor his support during George's election to the throne of Greece. Whilst there, George met the then twelve-year-old Olga for the first time. George visited Russia again in 1867 to meet with his sister Dagmar, who had married Tsarevitch Alexander (later A...

    Throughout their marriage, George I and Olga were a close-knit couple, and contrary to the prevailing custom spent much time with their children, who grew up in a warm family atmosphere. With age, however, George I argued with his sons and Olga lamented the quarrels that divided the family periodically. In private, Olga and George I conversed in Ge...

    Olga was genuinely popular and was extensively involved in charity work. On arrival in Athens, her immediate patronages included the Amalieion orphanage founded by the previous queen consort Amalia of Oldenburg, and the Arsakeion school for girls located on University Boulevard. With her personal support and the support of wealthy donors, she built...

    An Orthodox Christian from birth, Queen Olga became aware, during visits to wounded servicemen in the Greco-Turkish War (1897), that many were unable to read the Bible. The version used by the Church of Greece included the Septuagint version of the Old Testament and the original Greek-language version of the New Testament. Both were written in anci...

    In 1913, the First Balkan War ended with the defeat of the Ottoman Empire by a coalition of Greek, Bulgarian, Serbian and Montenegrin forces. Greece was considerably enlarged at the expense of Turkey, but divisions between the victorious powers in the Balkan League soon became apparent: Athens and Sofia vied for possession of Thessaloniki and its r...

    In August 1914, Olga was in Russia at the outbreak of World War I, in which the Allied or Entente Powers including Russia, Britain and France fought against the Central Powers including Germany, Austria-Hungary and the Ottoman Empire. She decided to stay in Saint Petersburg and establish a military hospital to support the Russian war effort. Olga c...

    After several months of appeals for help, the Danish legation in Russia issued Olga a passport, which she used to enter Germany on the eve of its defeat, eventually joining her eldest son and his family in Switzerland in early 1919. Other members of the Russian imperial family did not escape. Among those killed were the Tsar, Tsarina and their five...

    On 2 October 1920, King Alexander was bitten by a monkey during a walk through the gardens at Tatoi. The wound became infected and Alexander developed sepsis. On 19 October, he began to rave and called for his mother, but the Greek government refused to allow Queen Sophia to return to Greece. Worried about her son, and knowing that his grandmother ...

    Constantine I returned to the throne 18 months into the Greco-Turkish War, launched in May 1919. In September 1921, the Greek defeat at the battle of Sakarya marked the beginning of the Greek retreat from Anatolia. Resentment among the allies for Constantine's policy during World War I prevented Athens from receiving outside support. Mustafa Kemal ...

  5. La gran duquesa María Pávlovna de Rusia (en ruso: Великая Княгиня Мария Павловна; San Petersburgo, 18 de abril de 1890 - Mainau, 13 de diciembre de 1958 ), fue hija del gran duque Pablo Aleksándrovich de Rusia y de su primera esposa la gran duquesa Alejandra Gueórguievna, nacida princesa de Grecia y Dinamarca.