Yahoo Search Búsqueda en la Web

  1. Cerca de 30 resultados de búsqueda

  1. When her husband succeeded as 2nd Earl of Godolphin in 1712, she became Countess of Godolphin. An act of the English parliament in 1706 allowed the 1st Duke's daughters to inherit his English titles. Following his death in 1722, Lady Godolphin became suo jure Duchess of Marlborough .

  2. Henrietta Churchill (later Godolphin), 2nd Duchess of Marlborough in her own right: 19 July 1681 24 October 1733 Married The Hon. Francis Godolphin (later Viscount Rialton by courtesy and 2nd Earl of Godolphin respectively) on 23 April 1698.

  3. Francis Godolphin, 2nd Earl of Godolphin, PC (3 September 1678 – 17 January 1766), styled Viscount Rialton from 1706 to 1712, was an English courtier and politician who sat in the English and British House of Commons between 1695 and 1712, when he succeeded to the peerage as Earl of Godolphin.

  4. The couple had five children who survived to adulthood: Henrietta Churchill, 2nd Duchess of Marlborough (1681–1733), Lady Anne Churchill (1683–1716), John Churchill, Marquess of Blandford (1686–1703), Elizabeth (1687–1714), and Mary (1689–1719). Early service (1678–1700) Crisis

  5. When the 1st Duke of Marlborough died in 1722 his title as Lord Churchill of Eyemouth in the Peerage of Scotland became extinct and the Marlborough titles passed, according to the Act, to his eldest daughter Henrietta (1681–1733), the 2nd Duchess of Marlborough. She was married to the 2nd Earl of Godolphin and had a son who predeceased her.

  6. Anne gave control of the army to Lord Marlborough, whom she appointed Captain-General. Marlborough also received numerous honours from the Queen; he was created a Knight of the Garter and was elevated to the rank of duke. The Duchess of Marlborough was appointed Groom of the Stool, Mistress of the Robes, and Keeper of the Privy Purse.

  7. Marlborough himself could not be displaced, but his relations were dismissed from their posts in turn. When the greatest of these, Lord Godolphin, was ejected from office on 10 August 1710, five commissioners to the treasury were appointed; among them was Harley as Chancellor of the Exchequer. Chancellor of the Exchequer: 1710–1711