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  1. This is a list of Imperial German infantry regiments before and during World War I. In peacetime, the Imperial German Army included 217 regiments of infantry (plus the instruction unit, Lehr Infantry Battalion). Some of these regiments had a history stretching back to the 17th Century, while others were only formed as late as October 1912.

  2. Hindenburg, Wilhelm II, Ludendorff, January 1917. The Oberste Heeresleitung ( German pronunciation: [ˈoːbɐstə ˈheːʁəsˌlaɪtʊŋ], "Supreme Army Command", OHL) was the highest echelon of command of the army ( Heer) of the German Empire. In the latter part of World War I, the Third OHL assumed dictatorial powers and became the de facto ...

  3. The Imperial German Navy or the Kaiserliche Marine (Imperial Navy) was the navy of the German Empire, which existed between 1871 and 1919. It grew out of the small Prussian Navy (from 1867 the North German Federal Navy ), which was mainly for coast defence. Kaiser Wilhelm II greatly expanded the navy. The key leader was Admiral Alfred von ...

  4. The Deutsche Luftstreitkräfte ( German: [ˈdɔʏtʃə ˈlʊftˌʃtʁaɪtkʁɛftə], German Air Combat Forces)—known before October 1916 as Die Fliegertruppen des deutschen Kaiserreiches (The Imperial German Air Service, lit “The flying troops of the German Kaiser’s Reich”)—was the air arm of the Imperial German Army. [1]

  5. The 8th Army ( German: 8. Armee / Armeeoberkommando 8 / A.O.K. 8) was an army level command of the German Army in World War I. It was formed on mobilization in August 1914 from the I Army Inspectorate. [1] The army was dissolved on 29 September 1915, but reformed on 30 December 1915. [2] It was finally disbanded in 1919 during demobilization ...

  6. 5th Army (German Empire) 5. Armee. The 5th Army ( German: 5. Armee / Armeeoberkommando 5 / A.O.K. 5) was an army level command of the German Army in World War I. It was formed on mobilization in August 1914 seemingly from the VII Army Inspection. The army was disbanded in 1919 during demobilization after the war. [1]

  7. External links. A Pocket German Army; Sources. Farwell, Byron (2001). The Encyclopedia of Nineteenth-Century Land Warfare: an Illustrated World View.W.W Norton & Company, New York.