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  1. James Stuart, Duke of Cambridge KG (12 July 1663 – 20 June 1667) was the second son of the Duke of York (later James II of England) and his first wife, Anne Hyde. In 1664, the infant James became the first Duke of Cambridge and Baron of Dauntsey , titles his uncle, King Charles II , created especially for him.

  2. James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth 1649–1685: William III and II 1650–1702 r. 1689–1702: Mary II 1662–1694 r. 1689–1694: Anne 1665–1714 r. 1702–1714: James Francis Edward Stuart "the Old Pretender" 1688–1766: Louisa Maria Stuart 1692–1712: George I 1660–1727 r. 1714–1727: Prince William, Duke of Gloucester 1689–1700 ...

  3. James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth, 1st Duke of Buccleuch, KG, PC (9 April 1649 – 15 July 1685) was a Dutch-born English nobleman and military officer. Originally called James Crofts or James Fitzroy , he was born in Rotterdam in the Netherlands , the eldest illegitimate son of Charles II of England , Scotland , and Ireland with his mistress Lucy Walter .

  4. James Francis Fitz-James Stuart, who inherited the title Duke of Berwick on his father's death, or Jacobo Francisco Fitz-James Stuart, 2nd Duke of Berwick, 2nd Duke of Liria and Xerica (Saint-Germain-en-Laye, Yvelines, 21 October 1696 – Naples, Italy, 2 June 1738).

  5. History. The title was first granted in 1660 by King Charles II (immediately following the Restoration of the monarchy) to his infant eldest nephew Charles Stuart (1660–1661), the first son of the Duke of York (later King James II), though he was never formally created Duke of Cambridge as he died at the age of six months.

  6. The James Plays—James I, James II and James III—are a trio of history plays by Rona Munro. Each play stands alone as a vision of a country tussling with its past and future. This play focuses on the personal development of James I after his release by Henry V of England, his marriage to Joan and the struggles with the noble families to establish his authority in Scotland.

  7. From 1816 to 1837, the Duke of Cambridge served as viceroy of the Kingdom of Hanover on behalf of his elder brothers, George IV and later William IV. When his niece succeeded to the British throne on 20 June 1837 as Queen Victoria , the 122-year union of the crowns of the United Kingdom and Hanover ended, due to Hanover being under Salic Law . [1]