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  1. 22/11/2022 · James Audley, 2nd Baron Audley (8 January 1312/1313 — 1 April 1386) of Heighley Castle, Staffordshire, was an English peer. He was the son and heir of Nicholas Audley, 1st Baron Audley (1289–1316) by his wife Joan FitzMartin (died Feb. 1320 / 1 Aug. 1322), daughter of William I FitzMartin (d.1324), feudal baron of Barnstaple, Devon.

    • January 07, 1314
    • Staffordshire, England
    • Puriton
    • Communications
    • Population
    • Settlement and Buildings
    • Castle and Borough
    • Social Life
    • Puriton and Downend
    • Puriton and Crandon
    • Rectory
    • Agriculture

    The ancient parish of Puriton lies on the gentle northern slope of the Polden ridge at its western end. The arable fields occupied the top of the slope, its grassland mostly on Puriton Level to the north and north-east and beside the river Parrett to the south-west. The parish includes the large but compact village of Puriton, 5 km. north-east of B...

    The probable Roman road along the Poldens from Ilchester left the ridge south of Woolavington for the port near Crandon Bridge. (fn. 8) A route westwards, probably contemporary, led north-west up Puriton Hill to Pawlett and thence either westward to the Parrett crossing at Combwich or northward towards Huntspill, Highbridge, and Bristol. Part was k...

    There were said to be 32 households in the parish in the 17th century. (fn. 14) In 1801 the population was 332. It increased rapidly in the 1820s, fell in the 1830s, but again increased, reaching a peak in 1881 with 753 people. Thereafter it declined, particularly in the 1890s, and by 1911 had reached 612. In the 1920s growth began and was increase...

    Iron-age and Romano-British settlements are indicated west of Puriton village and there are traces of linear banks and ditches of field systems on Puriton Level to the north. (fn. 16) Puriton village is on the gentle northern slope of the Poldens and appears to have developed from two roughly parallel streets with the church and a small green known...

    The name Caput Montis, (fn. 28) later Chefdelmunt (fn. 29) or Chisley Mount, (fn. 30) was given in the later 12th century (fn. 31) to the prominent western end of the Polden ridge where a castle has been identified and a borough was established. The form la Donend, later Downend, occurs in 1281. (fn. 32) A mound, thought to be a motte, was excavate...

    There were three victuallers in the parish in 1620 (fn. 51) and Richard Meaker, in business in 1674, had been succeeded by Elizabeth Meaker by 1687. (fn. 52) By 1861 there were two inns, the Puriton inn, at the top of Puriton Hill, near the crossroads between the village and Downend, and the Exchange at Downend. (fn. 53) Both remained in business i...

    Three hides of land at Pirition, assumed to be Puriton, formed part of Gastonbury abbey's estate by 854. (fn. 59) In 1066 six hides at Puriton were held by Queen Edith. By 1086 possession had passed to the church of St. Peter in Rome. (fn. 60) By 1186–7 Maud de Chandos, widow of Philip de Columbers (I) (d. c. 1185) and a descendant of Alfred d'Epai...

    In 1243 Thomas Trivet held land in Puriton. (fn. 85) He or a namesake died in 1281 holding ⅛ fee of John de Columbers there and land at Downend as well as an estate at Crandon in Bawdrip. (fn. 86) He was succeeded by his son (Sir) William who died in 1314 when his heir was his grandson Thomas. (fn. 87) Thomas died in 1316 and was succeeded by his p...

    Before 1200–01 the rectory had been acquired by Goldcliff priory (Mon., now Gwent). (fn. 122) It was in the hands of the Crown by 1338 (fn. 123) and so remained until 1387 or later. (fn. 124) Tewkesbury abbey was granted Goldcliff property in 1441 (fn. 125) and the issues were received on its behalf by the prior of St. James's, Bristol. (fn. 126) I...

    In 1086 Puriton was a single estate assessed at 6 hides but taxed on 5, which had arable land for 12 ploughteams. The demesne farm measured 3 hides and had 2 teams and 4 serfs. Tenants, described as 11 villeins and 4 bordars, had 6 teams. There were 300 a. of grassland, half meadow and half pasture, and the demesne supported 2 cows and 60 sheep. Th...

  2. hace 6 días · James Fiennes, 1st Baron Saye and Sele (1450) – beheaded in London by rebels led by Jack Cade; James Tuchet, 5th Baron Audley (1459) – executed after Battle of Blore Heath for being a Lancastrian; Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury, KG, PC – Lord Chancellor (1460) – executed after the Battle of Wakefield for being a Yorkist

  3. hace 3 días · Before Warwick could join them, the Yorkist army of 5,000 troops under Salisbury was ambushed by a Lancastrian force twice their size under James Tuchet, 5th Baron Audley at Blore Heath on 23 September 1459. The Lancastrian army was defeated, and Baron Audley himself killed in the fighting.

  4. 09/11/2022 · Henry de Audley (1175 – 1246), or Henry de Aldithel and Alditheley, was an English baron.[1] Audley was a royalist baron, born about 1175 to Adam de Alditheley, who held Alditheley (Staff.) from the Verdons in 1186.

  5. 29/10/2022 · Sir John Tuchet was born. This information is part of Genealogy Heynen Hanson Baumberger Bartling and more by Carolee Heynen on Genealogy Online.

  6. 16/11/2022 · Edward Sutton, 5th Baron Dudley (1567–1643) was a major landowner, mainly in Staffordshire and Worcestershire, and briefly a Member of the House of Commons of England.[1] Through his intemperate behaviour he won widespread notoriety, completed the financial ruin of his family, and was the last of his name to bear the title.