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  1. 24/11/2021 · Der bekannteste ist der Turm, der zum Schloss in Kopenhagen gehörte, das ein Gefängnis war, unter anderem wurde die Autorin Leonora Christina Ulfeldt darin zwanzig Jahre gefangen gehalten. ‖4 Sprichwörter und der „blaue Montag“

  2. 22/11/2021 · Det svarer jo til at udskyde serien om Leonora Christina Ulfeldt, fordi man frygter, at en advokatundersøgelse vil vise, at der var forsøg på landsforræderi.« En farlig vej at gå Det er ikke første gang, at en film eller serie udskydes, fordi man frygter, at den vil blive koblet til en virkelig hændelse.

  3. 25/11/2021 · Denkwürdigkeiten der Gräfin zu Schleswig-Holstein Leonora Christina Last Update: 2021-11-19 02:24 NATRIUM CHLORID: Der neunte Fall für Carl Mørck, Sonderdezernat Q, Thriller (Carl-Mørck-Reihe, Band 9)

  4. 23/11/2021 · Leonora Christina Ulfeldt's "Jammers-minde". En egenhændig skiedring of hendes fangenskab i Blaataa (19) Slægten by Gustav Wied (19) En Nihilist by S. Stepniak (18) Ved Vejen by Herman Bang (18) Fru Marie Grubbe: Interieurer fra det syttende Aarhundrede by J. P. Jacobsen (16) Støv og Stjærner by Knud Hjortø (16)

    • Early Life
    • Regency
    • Reign
    • Abdication
    • Departure and Exile
    • Visits to France and Italy
    • Back to Rome
    • Revisiting Sweden
    • Later Life
    • Death and Burial

    Christina was born in the royal castle Tre Kronor on 18 December [O.S. 8 December] 1626. Her parents were the Swedish king Gustavus Adolphus and his German wife, Maria Eleonora. They had already had three children: two daughters (a stillborn princess in 1621, and then the first Princess Christina, who was born in 1623 and died the following year) and a stilborn son in May 1625.[c] Excited expectation surrounded Maria Eleonora's fourth pregnancy in 1626. When the baby was born, it was first thought to be a boy as it was "hairy" and screamed "with a strong, hoarse voice." She later wrote in her autobiography that, "Deep embarrassment spread among the women when they discovered their mistake." The king, though, was very happy, stating, "She'll be clever, she has made fools of us all!"From most accounts, Gustav Adolf appears to have been closely attached to his daughter, and she appears to have admired him greatly. The Crown of Sweden was hereditary in the House of Vasa, but from King C...

    Before Gustav Adolf left for Germany to defend Protestantism in the Thirty Years' War, he secured his daughter's right to inherit the throne, in case he never returned, and gave orders to Axel Gustafsson Banér,his marshal, that Christina should receive an education of the type normally only afforded to boys. Her mother, of the House of Hohenzollern, was a woman of volatile temperament. It is possible she was insane. After the king died on 6 November 1632 on the battlefield, his corpse was brought home in a coffin, with his heart in a separate box. Maria Eleonora ordered that the king should not be buried until she could be buried with him. She also demanded that the coffin be kept open, and went to see it regularly, patting it and taking no notice of the putrefaction. Eventually, the embarrassed chancellor, Axel Oxenstierna, saw no other solution than to have a guard posted at the room to prevent further episodes.As a result, he was not buried until 22 June 1634, more than eighteen...

    In 1644, Christina was declared an adult, although the coronation was postponed because of the war with Denmark-Norway. In December 1643, Swedish troops had overrun Holstein and Jutland in the Torstenson War. The Swedes achieved much from their surprise attack, and at the Treaty of Brömsebro Denmark added the isles of Gotland and Ösel to Christina's domain while Norway lost the districts of Jämtland and Härjedalen to her. Under Christina's rule, Sweden, now virtually controlling the Baltic Sea, had unrestricted access to the North Sea and was no longer encircled by Denmark–Norway. In 1649 Louis de Geer founded the Swedish Africa Company and in 1650 Christina hired Hendrik Carloff to improve trade on Gold Coast. In 1649, with the help of her uncle, John Casimir, and her cousins, Christina tried to reduce the influence of Oxenstierna, and she declared John Casimir's son, her cousin Charles Gustav, as her heir presumptive. The following year, Christina resisted demands from the other e...

    When Christina decided she wanted her first cousin Charles to be heir to the throne, she agreed to stay on the condition the councils never again asked her to marry. In 1651, Christina lost much of her popularity after the beheading of Arnold Johan Messenius, together with his 17-year-old son, who had accused her of serious misbehavior and of being a "Jezebel".According to them "Christina was bringing everything to ruin, and that she cared for nothing but sport and pleasure." In 1653, she founded the Amaranten order. Antonio Pimentel was appointed as its first knight; all members had to promise not to marry (again). In 1653, she ordered Vossius (and Heinsius) to make a list of about 6,000 books and manuscripts to be packed and shipped to Antwerp. In February 1654, she plainly told the Council of her plans to abdicate. Oxenstierna told her she would regret her decision within a few months. In May, the Riksdag discussed her proposals. She had asked for 200,000 rikstalers a year, but r...

    In the summer of 1654, Christina left Sweden in men's clothing with the help of Bernardino de Rebolledo, and rode as Count Dohna, through Denmark. Relations between the two countries were still so tense that a former Swedish queen could not have traveled safely in Denmark. Christina had already packed and shipped abroad valuable books, paintings, statues and tapestries from her Stockholm castle, leaving its treasures severely depleted. Christina visited Frederick III, Duke of Holstein-Gottorp, and while there thought that her successor should have a bride. She sent letters recommending two of the Duke's daughters to Charles. Based on this recommendation, he married Hedwig Eleonora. On 10 July Christina arrived in Hamburg and stayed with Jacob Curiel at Krameramtsstuben. Christina visited Johann Friedrich Gronovius, and Anna Maria van Schurman in the Dutch Republic. In August, she arrived in the Southern Netherlands, and settled down in Antwerp. For four months Christina was lodged i...

    King Philip IV of Spain ruled the Duchy of Milan and the Kingdom of Naples. The French politician Mazarin, an Italian himself, had attempted to liberate Naples from Spanish rule, against which the locals had fought before the Neapolitan Republic was created. A second expedition in 1654 had failed and the Duke of Guise gave up. Christina's goal was to become a mediator between France and Spain in their contest to control Naples. Her plan detailed that she would lead French troops to take Naples and rule until bequeathing the crown to France after her death. Christina sent home all her Spanish servants, including her confidant Pimentel and her confessor Guêmes. On 20 July 1656 Christina set sail from Civitavecchiafor Marseille where she arrived nine days later. In early August she traveled to Paris, accompanied by the Duke of Guise. Mazarin gave her no official sponsorship, but gave instructions that she be celebrated and entertained in every town on her way north. On 8 September she...

    On 15 May 1658, Christina arrived in Rome for the second time, but this time it was definitely no triumph. With the execution of Monaldeschi her popularity was lost. Pope Alexander VII remained in his summer residence and wanted no further visits from her. He described her as 'a woman born of a barbarian, barbarously brought up and living with barbarous thoughts [...] with a ferocious and almost intolerable pride'. She stayed at the Palazzo Rospigliosi, which belonged to Mazarin, the French cardinal, situated close to the Quirinal Palace; so the pope was enormously relieved when in July 1659 she moved to Trastevere to live in Palazzo Riario, below the Janiculum, designed by Bramante. It was Cardinal Azzolino, her "bookkeeper" who signed the contract, as well as provided her with new servants to replace Francesco Santinelli, who had been Monaldeschi's executioner.[o] The Riario Palace became her home for the rest of her life. She decorated the walls with tapestries by Giovanni France...

    In April 1660 Christina was informed that Charles X Gustav had died in February. His son, Charles XI, was only five years old. That summer, she went to Sweden, pointing out that she had left the throne to her first cousin and his descendant, so if Charles XI died, she would take over the throne again. But as she was a Catholic that was impossible, and the clergy refused to let the priests in her entourage celebrate any Masses. Christina left Stockholm and went to Norrköping. Eventually she submitted to a second renunciation of the throne, spending a year in Hamburg to get her finances in order on her way back to Rome. Already in 1654 she had left her income to the banker Diego Teixeira in return for him sending her a monthly allowance and covering her debts in Antwerp. She visited the Teixeira family at Jungfernstiegand entertained them in her own lodgings. In the summer of 1662, she arrived in Rome for the third time, followed by some fairly happy years. A variety of complaints and...

    Christina's fourth and last entry in Rome took place on 22 November 1668. Clement IX often visited her; they had a shared interest in plays. Christina organized meetings of the Accademia in the Great Hall which had ‘a platform for singers and players’. When the pope suffered a stroke, she was among the few he wanted to see at his deathbed. In 1671 Christina established Rome's first public theatre in a former jail, Tor di Nona. The new pope, Clement X, worried about the influence of theatre on public morals. When Innocent XI became pope, things turned even worse; within a few years he made Christina's theatre into a storeroom for grain, although he had been a frequent guest in her royal box with the other cardinals. He forbade women to perform with song or acting, and the wearing of decolleté dresses. Christina considered this sheer nonsense, and let women perform in her palace. In 1675 she invited António Vieira to become her confessor. Itinerant doctor and scapegrace, Nicolaas Hein...

    In February 1689, the 62-year-old Christina fell seriously ill after a visit to the temples in Campania, and received the last rites. She suffered from diabetes mellitus. Christina seemed to recover, but in the middle of April she developed an acute streptococcus bacterial infection known as erysipelas, then contracted pneumoniaand a high fever. On her deathbed she sent the pope a message asking if he could forgive her insults. She died on 19 April 1689 in Palazzo Corsini at six in the morning. Christina had asked for a simple burial in the Pantheon, Rome, but the pope insisted on her being displayed on a lit de parade for four days in the Riario Palace. She was embalmed, covered with white brocade, a silver mask, a gilt crown and scepter. "The Queen wore a thin mantle, decorated with hundreds of crowns and fur bordered with ermine, under this a splendid garment in two pieces, thin gloves and drawers of knitted silk and a pair of elegant textile bootees". In similar fashion to the p...

  5. 24/11/2021 · Vorstellung der Neuerscheinungen deutschsprachiger eBooks bei ngiyaw eBooks - Romane, Novellen, Erzählungen, Essays, Märchen, Gedichte

  6. 24/11/2021 · Sjælden samling af eventyr og breve udbydes på auktion - en autograf fra et af danmarkshistoriens mest omdiskuterede ægtepar er også til salg.