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  1. The Presbyterian Church in Ireland is the largest Presbyterian church in Ireland and the biggest Protestant denomination in Northern Ireland. It has over 225,000 members, represented by over 500 congregations.[1]

  2. 15/11/2017 · A select list of writings which brings together a compilation of books and articles relating to the history of Irish Presbyterianism is now available. It covers the period from 2006 to 2017. Parts of the list appeared for some years in the annual Bulletin of the Presbyterian Historical Society of Ireland.

  3. In Ireland, Presbyterianism was introduced by Scottish immigrants and missionaries to Ulster. The Presbytery of Ulster was formed separately from the established church, in 1642. Presbyterians, along with Roman Catholics in Ulster and the rest of Ireland, suffered under the discriminatory Penal Laws until they were revoked in the early 19th century.

  4. The Presbyterian Church in Ireland is the largest Presbyterian church in Ireland and the biggest Protestant denomination in Northern Ireland. It has over 225,000 members, represented by over 500 congregations. References

  5. El nombre legal y oficial de la región es Irlanda del Norte ( Northern Ireland ). Este término es aceptado por los gobiernos del Reino Unido y de la República de Irlanda, así como por los organismos internacionales y la mayoría de sus habitantes. 10 Además, forma parte de la nomenclatura oficial del estado británico: Reino Unido de Gran ...

  6. It was first published in 1866 but was re-printed by the Presbyterian Historical Society of Ireland in 2007. Copies are still available for sale. Sketches of the History of Presbyterianism in Ireland, including a narrative of the Siege of Derry, was written in 1803 by the Rev William Campbell, a leading figure in the Synod of Ulster in the 18th ...

  7. Presbyterianism came to Ireland with the arrival of Scottish settlers to Ulster in the early years of the seventeenth century.1 Despite opposition, at times intense, from the Episcopal Church of Ireland, Presbyterians consolidated a separate ecclesiastical and political identity in the north-east over the following century.