Yahoo Search Búsqueda en la Web

  1. Cerca de 62.600 resultados de búsqueda

  1. 18 de ene. de 2023 · Sir Robert Bruce Cotton, 1st Baronet, (born January 22, 1571, Denton, Huntingdonshire [now in Cambridgeshire], England—died May 6, 1631, Westminster, London), English antiquarian, the founder of the Cottonian Library, and a prominent Parliamentarian in the reign of Charles I. The collection of historical documents that he amassed in his library ...

    • The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica
  2. 18 de ene. de 2023 · Edward Seymour, 1st duke of Somerset, byname the Protector, also called (1523–36) Sir Edward Seymour, or (1536–37) Viscount Beauchamp of Hache, or (1537–47) earl of Hertford, (born c. 1500/06—died Jan. 22, 1552, London), the Protector of England during part of the minority of King Edward VI (reigned 1547–53).

    • The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica
  3. 19 de ene. de 2023 · Robert Carr, 1st Viscount Rochester: c. 1587–1645 1611 Later Earl of Somerset 408 Frederick V, Elector Palatine: 1596–1632 1612 409 Maurice de Nassau: 1567–1625 1612 Later Maurice, Prince of Orange 410 Thomas Erskine, 1st Viscount of Fentoun: 1566–1639 1615 Later Earl of Kellie 411 William Knollys, 1st Baron Knollys: c. 1547–1632 1615

  4. 20 de ene. de 2023 · An early resident in the street in 1644–5 (probably at one of the corners with Bow Street) was the notorious Earl of Somerset, father-in-law of the fourth Earl of Bedford's daughter, in the last year or so of his life. (fn. 5) But despite its good position and generous width Russell Street did not prove attractive to Covent Garden's more …

    • Childhood
    • Rule in Scotland
    • Accession in England
    • Early Reign in England
    • King and Parliament
    • King and Church
    • Personal Relationships
    • Health and Death
    • Legacy
    • Titles, Styles, Honours, and Arms

    Birth

    James was the only son of Mary, Queen of Scots, and her second husband, Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley. Both Mary and Darnley were great-grandchildren of Henry VII of England through Margaret Tudor, the older sister of Henry VIII. Mary's rule over Scotland was insecure, and she and her husband, being Roman Catholics, faced a rebellion by Protestant noblemen. During Mary's and Darnley's difficult marriage, Darnley secretly allied himself with the rebels and conspired in the murder of the queen's p...

    Regencies

    The care of James was entrusted to the Earl and Countess of Mar, "to be conserved, nursed, and upbrought" in the security of Stirling Castle. James was anointed King of Scotland at the age of thirteen months at the Church of the Holy Rude in Stirling, by Adam Bothwell, Bishop of Orkney, on 29 July 1567. The sermon at the coronation was preached by John Knox. In accordance with the religious beliefs of most of the Scottish ruling class, James was brought up as a member of the Protestant Church...

    Lennox was a Protestant convert, but he was distrusted by Scottish Calvinists who noticed the physical displays of affection between him and the king and alleged that Lennox "went about to draw the King to carnal lust". In August 1582, in what became known as the Ruthven Raid, the Protestant earls of Gowrie and Angus lured James into Ruthven Castle...

    From 1601, in the last years of Elizabeth's life, certain English politicians—notably her chief minister Robert Cecil[f]—maintained a secret correspondence with James to prepare in advance for a smooth succession.With the queen clearly dying, Cecil sent James a draft proclamation of his accession to the English throne in March 1603. Elizabeth died ...

    James survived two conspiracies in the first year of his reign, despite the smoothness of the succession and the warmth of his welcome: the Bye Plot and Main Plot, which led to the arrest of Lord Cobham and Walter Raleigh, among others. Those hoping for a change in government from James were disappointed at first when he kept Elizabeth's Privy Coun...

    The co-operation between monarch and Parliament following the Gunpowder Plot was atypical. Instead, it was the previous session of 1604 that shaped the attitudes of both sides for the rest of the reign, though the initial difficulties owed more to mutual incomprehension than conscious enmity. On 7 July 1604, James had angrily prorogued Parliamentaf...

    After the Gunpowder Plot, James sanctioned harsh measures to control English Catholics. In May 1606, Parliament passed the Popish Recusants Act, which could require any citizen to take an Oath of Allegiance denying the pope's authority over the king. James was conciliatory towards Catholics who took the Oath of Allegiance, and tolerated crypto-Cath...

    Throughout his life James had close relationships with male courtiers, which has caused debate among historians about their exact nature. In Scotland Anne Murray was known as the king's mistress. After his accession in England, his peaceful and scholarly attitude contrasted strikingly with the bellicose and flirtatious behaviour of Elizabeth, as in...

    In his later years, James suffered increasingly from arthritis, gout and kidney stones. He also lost his teeth and drank heavily. The king was often seriously ill during the last year of his life, leaving him an increasingly peripheral figure, rarely able to visit London, while Buckingham consolidated his control of Charles to ensure his own future...

    James was widely mourned. For all his flaws, he had largely retained the affection of his people, who had enjoyed uninterrupted peace and comparatively low taxation during the Jacobean era. "As he lived in peace," remarked the Earl of Kellie, "so did he die in peace, and I pray God our king [Charles I] may follow him". The Earl prayed in vain: once...

    Titles and styles

    In Scotland, James was "James the sixth, King of Scotland", until 1604. He was proclaimed "James the first, King of England, France, and Ireland, defender of the faith" in London on 24 March 1603. On 20 October 1604, James issued a proclamation at Westminster changing his style to "King of Great Brittaine, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, &c." The style was not used on English statutes, but was used on proclamations, coinage, letters, treaties, and in Scotland. James styled himself...

    Arms

    As King of Scotland, James bore the ancient royal arms of Scotland: Or, a lion rampant Gules armed and langued Azure within a double tressure flory counter-flory Gules. The arms were supported by two unicorns Argent armed, crined and unguled Proper, gorged with a coronet Or composed of crosses patée and fleurs de lys a chain affixed thereto passing between the forelegs and reflexed over the back also Or. The crest was a lion sejant affrontée Gules, imperially crowned Or, holding in the dexter...

  5. 15 de ene. de 2023 · Opponents of the king's favourite Robert Carr, Earl of Somerset, saw an opportunity to displace Somerset and began promoting Villiers. Money was raised to purchase Villiers a new wardrobe, and intense lobbying secured his appointment as Royal Cup-bearer , a position that allowed him to make conversation with the king. [7]

  6. 9 de ene. de 2023 · Lady Lucy Somerset, Baroness Latimer (c.1524 – 23 February 1583) was an English noblewoman and the daughter of Henry Somerset, 2nd Earl of Worcester though there is disagreement as to whether her mother was his first wife Lady Margaret Courtenay or his second wife, Elizabeth Browne. She served as a Maid of Honour to Queen consort Catherine Howard.

  1. Anuncio
    relacionado con: Robert Carr, 1st Earl of Somerset
  2. 100,000+ usuarios visitaron beenverified.com el mes pasado

    Find Info You May Not See Elsewhere With BeenVerified®. Easy Online Background Reports. Check vehicle history for all car make & models. Start your search today