Yahoo Search Búsqueda en la Web

  1. Cerca de 174.000 resultados de búsqueda
  1. Anuncio
    relacionado con: Robert Walpole
  1. Biografía. Robert Walpole nació en 1676 en el seno de su familia noble en Houghton, cerca de King's Lynn en el condado de Norfolk en Inglaterra.Hijo del coronel Robert Walpole (1650 - 1700), diputado por la circunscripción del Castle Rising en los Comunes, y de su esposa Mary de soltera Burwell, era el tercero de diecisiete hijos, ocho de los cuales murieron durante la infancia.

  2. Robert Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford, KG PC (26 August 1676 – 18 March 1745; known between 1725 and 1742 as Sir Robert Walpole) was a British statesman and Whig politician who is generally regarded as the de facto first Prime Minister of Great Britain . Although the exact dates of Walpole's dominance, dubbed the "Robinocracy", are a matter of ...

  3. 18/08/2020 · Walpole lived in 10 Downing Street from 1735 having insisted that it become the residence of the First Lord of the Treasury, rather than being given to him personally. Read more about Sir Robert ...

  4. Robert Walpole. (Robert Walpole, conde de Orford; Houghton Hall, Norfolk, Inglaterra, 1676 - Londres, 1745) Político británico que dirigió la creación de la monarquía parlamentaria. Entró en la Cámara de los Comunes desde 1700, destacando entre los miembros del partido Whig, que defendía ideas liberales y parlamentarias.

    • Early Life and Family
    • Early Political Career
    • Stanhope/Sunderland Ministry
    • Rise to Power
    • Premiership Under George I
    • Premiership Under George II
    • Decline
    • Later Years
    • Legacy
    • Referencesisbn Links Support Nwe Through Referral Fees

    Robert Walpole was born in Houghton Hall, Norfolk in 1676. His father, also named Robert Walpole, was a Whig politician who represented the borough of Castle Rising in the House of Commons. His mother was Mary Burwell Walpole; he was the third of 17 children, eight of whom died during infancy. Robert Walpole would later prove to hold the record amongst Prime Ministers for the greatest number of siblings. Walpole was a scholar at Eton College from 1690 to 1695 and matriculated at King's College, Cambridge in 1696. In 1698, he left the University of Cambridge after the death of his only remaining elder brother, Edward, so that he could help his father administer the family estate. Walpole had planned to become a clergyman, but abandoned the idea when, as the eldest surviving son in the family, he became the heir to his father's estate. On July 30, 1700, Walpole married Catherine Shorter with whom he had two daughters and four sons. Lady Catherine Walpole died suddenly on August 20, 17...

    Walpole's political career began in January 1701, when he won the general election in Castle Rising (the constituency once represented by his father, who had died just three months earlier). He left Castle Rising in 1702 so that he could contest the neighboring but more important borough of King's Lynn, a constituency that would re-elect him at every subsequent general election for the next forty years. Like his father, Robert Walpole was a zealous member of the Whig Party, which was then more powerful than the opposing Tory Party. In 1705, Walpole was appointed a member of the Council of the Lord High Admiral (then Prince George of Denmark, the husband of Queen Anne), a body which oversaw naval affairs. His administrative skills having been noticed, Walpole was promoted by Lord Godolphin (the Lord High Treasurer and leader of the Cabinet) to the position of Secretary at War in 1708; for a short period of time in 1710, he also simultaneously held the post of Treasurer of the Navy. W...

    Queen Anne died in 1714, to be succeeded by a distant German cousin, George I, under the Act of Settlement 1701. George I distrusted the Tories, who he believed opposed his right to succeed to the Throne. (The Act of Settlement had excluded several senior relatives of Anne on the grounds of their adherence to Roman Catholicism.) Thus, 1714, the year of George's accession, marked the ascendancy of the Whigs, who would remain in power for the next 50 years. Robert Walpole became a Privy Councillor and rose to the position of Paymaster of the Forces in a Cabinet nominally led by Lord Halifax, but actually dominated by Lord Townshend (Walpole's brother-in-law) and James Stanhope. Walpole was also appointed chairman of a secret committee formed to investigate the actions of the previous Tory ministry. The individuals who had brought about Walpole's impeachment in 1712 were now themselves attacked for purely political reasons: Lord Oxford was impeached, and Lord Bolingbroke suffered from...

    Soon after Walpole returned to the Cabinet, England was swept by a wave of over-enthusiastic speculation which led to the South Sea Bubble. The Government had established a plan whereby the South Sea Company would assume the national debt of Great Britain in exchange for lucrative bonds. It was widely believed that the Company would eventually reap an enormous profit through international trade in cloth, agricultural goods, and slaves. Many in the country, including Walpole himself, frenziedly invested in the company. By the latter part of 1720, however, the company had begun to collapse as the price of its shares plunged. Walpole was saved from financial ruin by his banker, who had earlier advised him to sell his shares; other investors, however, were not as fortunate. In 1721, a committee investigated the scandal, finding that there was corruption on the part of many in the Cabinet. Among those implicated were John Aislabie (the Chancellor of the Exchequer), James Craggs the Elder...

    Under the guidance of Walpole, Parliament attempted to deal with the financial crisis. The estates of the directors of the company were confiscated and used to relieve the suffering of the victims, and the stock of the South Sea Company was divided between the Bank of England and East India Company. The crisis had significantly damaged the credibility of the King and of the Whig Party, but Walpole defended both with skillful oratory in the House of Commons. Walpole's first year as Prime Minister was also marked by the discovery of a Jacobite plot formed by Francis Atterbury, the Bishop of Rochester. The exposure of the scheme crushed the hopes of the Jacobites, whose previous attempts at rebellion (most notably the risings of 1715 and 1719) had also failed. The Tory Party was equally unfortunate, even though Lord Bolingbroke, a Tory leader who fled to France to avoid punishment for his Jacobite sympathies, was permitted to return to England in 1723. During the remainder of George I'...

    Sir Robert Walpole's position was threatened in 1727, when George I died and was succeeded by George II. For a few days, it seemed that Walpole would be dismissed, but the King agreed to keep him in office upon the advice of Queen Caroline. Although the King disliked Townshend, he retained him as well. Over the next years, Walpole continued to share power with Townshend, but gradually became the clearly dominant partner in government. The two clashed over British foreign affairs, especially over policy regarding Prussia, but Walpole was ultimately victorious, with his colleague retiring on May 15, 1730. This date is often given as the beginning of Walpole's unofficial tenure as Prime Minister. During the following years, Walpole was more dominant than during any other part of his administration. Having secured the support of Queen Caroline, and, by extension, of King George II, he made liberal use of the royal patronage, granting honours and making appointments for political gains....

    The year 1737 was also marked by the death of Walpole's close friend, Queen Caroline. Though her death did not end his personal influence with George II, who had grown loyal to the Prime Minister during the preceding years, Walpole's domination of government continued to decline. His opponents acquired a vocal leader in the Prince of Wales, who was estranged from his father, the King. Several young politicians, including William Pitt the Elderand George Grenville, formed a faction known as the "Patriot Boys" and joined the Prince of Wales in opposition. Walpole's failure to maintain a policy of avoiding military conflict eventually led to his fall from power. Under the Treaty of Seville (1729), Great Britain agreed not to trade with the Spanish colonies in North America; Spain claimed the right to board and search British vessels to ensure compliance. Disputes, however, broke out over trade with the West Indies. Walpole attempted to prevent war, but was opposed by the King, the Hous...

    Orford was succeeded as Prime Minister by Lord Wilmington, in an administration whose true head was Lord Carteret. A committee was created to inquire into his ministry, but no substantial evidence of wrongdoing or corruption was discovered. Though no longer a member of the Cabinet, Lord Orford continued to maintain personal influence with George II and was often dubbed the "Minister behind the Curtain" for this advice and influence. In 1744, he managed to secure the dismissal of Carteret and the appointment of Henry Pelham. Orford died in London in 1745, aged nearly sixty-nine years; he was buried in his home town of Houghton. His earldom passed to his eldest son Robert, who was in turn succeeded by his only son George. Upon the death of the third Earl, the Earldom was inherited by the first Earl's younger son, Horace Walpole (a famous writer and friend of poet Thomas Gray), who died without heirs in 1797.

    Walpole's influence on the politics of his day was tremendous. The Tories became a minor, insignificant faction, and the Whigs became a dominant and largely unopposed party. His influence on the development of the uncodified constitution of Great Britain was less momentous, even though he is regarded as Great Britain's first Prime Minister. He relied primarily on the favor of the King, rather than on the support of the House of Commons. His power stemmed from his personal influence instead of the influence of his office. Most of his immediate successors were, comparatively speaking, extremely weak; it would take several decades more for the premiership to develop into the most powerful and most important office in the country. Walpole's strategy of keeping Great Britain at peace contributed greatly to the country's prosperity. Walpole also managed to secure the position of the Hanoverian Dynasty, and effectively countervailed Jacobitism. The Jacobite threat was effectively ended, so...

    Black, Jeremy. Walpole in power. Stroud, Gloucestershire: Sutton 2001. ISBN 9780750925235
    Dickinson, H. T. Walpole and the Whig supremacy. London: English Universities Press 1973. ISBN 9780340115152
    Hill, Brian W. Sir Robert Walpole: sole and prime minister. London: H. Hamilton 1989. ISBN 9780241127384
    Morley, John. Walpole. Westport, Conn: Greenwood Press 1971. ISBN 9780837145273
  5. 07/01/2022 · Robert Walpole was born on 26 August 1676 in Houghton, Norfolk into a wealthy landowning family. He was educated at Cambridge University and in 1701 became member of parliament for Castle Rising ...

  6. Robert Walpole, 1st earl of Orford, British statesman (in power 1721–42), generally regarded as the first British prime minister. He deliberately cultivated a frank, hearty manner, but his political subtlety has scarcely been equaled. Walpole was the third son of Colonel Robert Walpole by his wife,

  1. Anuncio
    relacionado con: Robert Walpole
  1. Otras búsquedas realizadas