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  1. William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham, PC, FRS (15 November 1708 – 11 May 1778) was a British statesman of the Whig group who served as Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1766 to 1768. Historians call him Chatham or William Pitt the Elder to distinguish him from his son William Pitt the Younger , who was also a prime minister.

  2. Also William Pulteney, Samuel Hoare (1716–1796) and John Harman were involved. [5] [6] Pulteney invested in plantations in the West Indies and in land what is today western New York state . The settlements of Bath , Pulteney , Henrietta and Caledonia are evidence of his speculation at the end of the 18th century, through ' The Pulteney Association ' an agency run by his agent Charles Williamson.

  3. On the left Pulteney's engineers did not have enough pontoons to cross the Marne (70–90 metres wide), and by nightfall half of 4th Division's battalions crossed on a makeshift floating bridge. The cavalry ( "Gough's Command" on the left flank, Allenby 's 1st Cavalry Division on the right, each maintaining contact with the adjacent French forces) was in Hew Strachan 's words "entirely out of ...

  4. The Somerset Light Infantry (Prince Albert's) was a light infantry regiment of the British Army, which served under various titles from 1685 to 1959.In 1959, the regiment was amalgamated with the Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry to form the Somerset and Cornwall Light Infantry which was again amalgamated, in 1968, with the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, the King's Shropshire Light ...

  5. George William Hervey, 2nd Earl of Bristol (1721–1775), unmarried 2. Lepell Hervey (15 April 1723 – 11 May 1780), married in 1743 Constantine John Phipps, 1st Baron Mulgrave, leaving issue 3. Augustus John Hervey, 3rd Earl of Bristol (1724–1779), died without legitimate issue 4.

  6. Robert Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford, KG PC (26 August 1676 – 18 March 1745; ... his detractors—such as William Pulteney, earl of Bath, ...

  7. In a possible comment on the politics of Crowne's adaptation, Phillips dedicated his version to William Pulteney, 1st Earl of Bath, a leading Whig politician. The second 1723 adaptation, also performed at Drury Lane, was Theophilus Cibber 's King Henry VI: A Tragedy , which used Act 5 of 2 Henry VI and Acts 1 and 2 of 3 Henry VI , and which featured his father Colley Cibber as Winchester.