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  1. Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill (Woodstock, Oxfordshire, Inglaterra; 30 de noviembre de 1874-Londres, 24 de enero de 1965), conocido como Winston Churchill, fue un político, militar, escritor y estadista británico que se desempeñó como Primer Ministro del Reino Unido de 1940 a 1945, durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial, y nuevamente de 1951 a 1955 por parte del Partido Conservador.

  2. Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, DL, FRS, RA (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was a British statesman who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945, during the Second World War, and again from 1951 to 1955. Best known for his wartime leadership as Prime Minister, Churchill was also a Sandhurst ...

  3. Winston Churchill (Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill; Blenheim Palace, Oxfordshire, 1874 - Londres, 1965) Político británico especialmente recordado por su mandato como primer ministro (1940-45) durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial: con su divisa "sangre, sudor y lágrimas", logró elevar la moral de las tropas y de la población civil y sostener la nación hasta la victoria aliada.

  4. 29/12/2017 · Winston Churchill was an inspirational statesman, writer, orator and leader who led Britain to victory in the Second World War. He served as Conservative Prime Minister twice - from 1940 to 1945 ...

    • Palacio de Blenheim, Reino Unido
    • Primeros años en política. Incorporándose al Partido Conservador, se hizo con un escaño por Oldham en 1900. Tuvo sus discrepancias con los conservadores en materia económica, pues consideraba que el gasto dedicado al ejército era desmesurado y se opuso a unos aranceles que supuestamente buscaban la preponderancia comercial de Reino Unido.
    • Primera Guerra Mundial. Como Primer Lord del Almirantazgo llevó a cabo cambios drásticos, pues Gran Bretaña pasó de consumir carbón a proveerse de petróleo.
    • El periodo de entreguerras. Tras regresar al Partido Conservador, en 1924 fue puesto al frente de la Hacienda británica. Así, Churchill se ocupó de vigilar el retorno del Reino Unido al patrón oro.
    • La Segunda Guerra Mundial. Fracasada la estrategia de apaciguar a Hitler, estalló la Segunda Guerra Mundial. Las sucesivas derrotas militares provocaron la caída de Chamberlain y el ascenso al poder de Churchill en mayo de 1940.
    • Early Life
    • Battles and Books
    • Churchill: “Crossing The Chamber”
    • Churchill and Gallipoli
    • Churchill Between The Wars
    • Churchill: The “British Bulldog”
    • The Iron Curtain

    Winston Churchill came from a long line of English aristocrat-politicians. His father, Lord Randolph Churchill, was descended from the First Duke of Marlborough and was himself a well-known figure in Tory politics in the 1870s and 1880s. His mother, born Jennie Jerome, was an American heiress whose father was a stock speculator and part-owner of The New YorkTimes. (Rich American girls like Jerome who married European noblemen were known as “dollar princesses.”) Churchill was born at the family’s estate near Oxford on November 30, 1874. He was educated at the Harrow prep school, where he performed so poorly that he did not even bother to apply to Oxford or Cambridge. Instead, in 1893 young Winston Churchill headed off to military school at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst.

    After he left Sandhurst, Churchill traveled all around the British Empire as a soldier and as a journalist. In 1896, he went to India; his first book, published in 1898, was an account of his experiences in India’s Northwest Frontier Province. In 1899, the London Morning Post sent him to cover the Boer War in South Africa, but he was captured by enemy soldiers almost as soon as he arrived. (News of Churchill’s daring escape through a bathroom window made him a minor celebrity back home in Britain.) By the time he returned to England in 1900, the 26-year-old Churchill had published five books.

    That same year, Winston Churchill joined the House of Commons as a Conservative. Four years later, he “crossed the chamber” and became a Liberal. His work on behalf of progressive social reforms such as an eight-hour workday, a government-mandated minimum wage, a state-run labor exchange for unemployed workers and a system of public health insurance infuriated his Conservative colleagues, who complained that this new Churchill was a traitor to his class.

    In 1911, Churchill turned his attention away from domestic politics when he became the First Lord of the Admiralty (akin to the Secretary of the Navy in the U.S.). Noting that Germany was growing more and more bellicose, Churchill began to prepare Great Britain for war: He established the Royal Naval Air Service, modernized the British fleet and helped invent one of the earliest tanks. Despite Churchill’s prescience and preparation, World War Iwas a stalemate from the start. In an attempt to shake things up, Churchill proposed a military campaign that soon dissolved into disaster: the 1915 invasion of the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey. Churchill hoped that this offensive would drive Turkey out of the war and encourage the Balkan states to join the Allies, but Turkish resistance was much stiffer than he had anticipated. After nine months and 250,000 casualties, the Allies withdrew in disgrace. After the debacle at Gallipoli, Churchill left the Admiralty.

    During the 1920s and 1930s, Churchill bounced from government job to government job, and in 1924 he rejoined the Conservatives. Especially after the Nazis came to power in 1933, Churchill spent a great deal of time warning his countrymen about the perils of German nationalism, but Britons were weary of war and reluctant to get involved in international affairs again. Likewise, the British government ignored Churchill’s warnings and did all it could to stay out of Hitler’s way. In 1938, Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain even signed an agreement giving Germany a chunk of Czechoslovakia – “throwing a small state to the wolves,” Churchill scolded – in exchange for a promise of peace. A year later, however, Hitler broke his promise and invaded Poland. Britain and France declared war. Chamberlain was pushed out of office, and Winston Churchill took his place as prime minister in May 1940.

    “I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears and sweat,” Churchill told the House of Commons in his first speech as prime minister. “We have before us many, many long months of struggle and of suffering. You ask, what is our policy? I can say: It is to wage war, by sea, land and air, with all our might and with all the strength that God can give us; to wage war against a monstrous tyranny, never surpassed in the dark, lamentable catalogue of human crime. That is our policy. You ask, what is our aim? I can answer in one word: It is victory, victory at all costs, victory in spite of all terror, victory, however long and hard the road may be; for without victory, there is no survival.” Just as Churchill predicted, the road to victory in World War IIwas long and difficult: France fell to the Nazis in June 1940. In July, German fighter planes began three months of devastating air raids on Britain herself. Though the future looked grim, Churchill did all he could to keep British spirit...

    The now-former prime minister spent the next several years warning Britons and Americans about the dangers of Soviet expansionism. In a speech in Fulton, Missouri, in 1946, for example, Churchill declared that an anti-democratic “Iron Curtain,” “a growing challenge and peril to Christian civilization,” had descended across Europe. Churchill’s speech was the first time anyone had used that now-common phrase to describe the Communist threat. In 1951, 77-year-old Winston Churchill became prime minister for the second time. He spent most of this term working (unsuccessfully) to build a sustainable détente between the East and the West. He retired from the post in 1955. In 1953, Queen Elizabeth made Winston Churchill a knight of the Order of the Garter. He died in 1965, one year after retiring from Parliament.

    • 4 min
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