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  1. Henry Clinton (British Army officer, born 1730) General Sir Henry Clinton, KB (16 April 1730 – 23 December 1795) was a British army officer and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1772 and 1795. He is best known for his service as a general during the American War of Independence.

    • 1751–1793
    • General
  2. 14/02/2020 · Henry Clinton March 4, 2020 Henry Clinton was a British general who fought in the American Revolution. He was Commander-in-Chief at the time that the colonies were lost. Not much is known of his early life and few details are known of his life after the war. Sir Henry Clinton | public domain courtesy of Wikimedia Commons He was born April 16, 1730.

  3. Sir Henry Clinton, (born April 16?, 1730?—died December 23, 1795, Cornwall, England), British commander in chief in America during the Revolutionary War. The son of George Clinton, a naval officer and administrator, Henry joined the New York militia in 1745 as a lieutenant. He went to London in 1749 and was commissioned in the British army in 1751.

  4. 17/07/2022 · General Sir Henry Clinton was a British General during the American Revolutionary War. After arriving in Boston three years previously, Clinton became British Commander-in-Chief in North America in 1778-1782. Following the war, Clinton returned to England and served in Parliament.

    • Early Life
    • Early Military Career
    • Seven Years' War
    • The American Revolution Begins
    • Failure in The South
    • Success in New York
    • in Command
    • Death

    Henry Clinton was likely born in 1730 to Admiral George Clinton (1686–1761), at the time the Governor of Newfoundland and Labrador, and his wife Ann Carle (1696–1767). References are that available post his birth date as 1730 or 1738; English peerage records state the date as April 16, 1730, but list his birth location as Newfoundland and George Cl...

    Beginning his military career with the local militia in 1745, Clinton obtained a captain's commission the following year and served in the garrison at the recently captured fortress of Louisbourgon Cape Breton Island. Three years later, he traveled back to England with hopes to secure another commission in the British Army. Purchasing a commission ...

    By 1758, Clinton had reached the rank of lieutenant colonel in the 1st Foot Guards (Grenadier Guards). Ordered to Germany during the Seven Years' War, he saw action at the Battles of Villinghausen (1761) and Wilhelmsthal (1762). Distinguishing himself, Clinton was promoted to colonel effective June 24, 1762, and appointed an aide-de-camp to the arm...

    Crushed by the loss of wife, Clinton failed to take his seat in Parliament and instead traveled to the Balkans to study the Russian army in 1774. While there, he also viewed several of the battlefields from the Russo-Turkish War (1768–1774). Returning from the trip, he took his seat in September 1774. With the American Revolution looming in 1775, C...

    On June 17, 1775, Clinton took part in the bloody British victory at the Battle of Bunker Hill. Initially tasked with providing reserves to Howe, he later crossed to Charlestown and worked to rally the dispirited British troops. In October, Howe replaced Gage as commander of British troops in America and Clinton was appointed as his second-in-comma...

    Utilizing Clinton's ideas, which called for a strike through the Guan Heights via Jamaica Pass, Howe flanked the Americans and led the army to victory at the Battle of Long Islandin August 1776. For his contributions, he was formally promoted to lieutenant general and made a Knight of the Order of Bath. As tensions between Howe and Clinton increase...

    Taking command at Philadelphia, with Major General Lord Charles Cornwallis as his second-in-command, Clinton was immediately weakened by the need to detach 5,000 men for service in the Caribbean against the French. Deciding to abandon Philadelphia to focus on holding New York, Clinton led the army into New Jersey in June. Conducting a strategic ret...

    Officially turning command over to Carleton in May, Clinton was made the scapegoat for the British defeat in America. Returning to England, he wrote his memoirs in an attempt to cleanse his reputation and resumed his seat in Parliament until 1784. Re-elected to Parliament in 1790, with assistance from Newcastle, Clinton was promoted to general thre...

    • Military And Naval History Expert
  5. Background. CLINTON, SIR HENRY (c. 1738–1795), British general, was the son of admiral George Clinton (governor of Newfoundland and subsequently of New York), and grandson of the 6th earl of Lincoln. After serving in the New York militia, he came to England and joined the Coldstream Guards. In 1758 he became captain and lieutenant-colonel in the ...