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  1. The 16th century was a period of vigorous economic expansion. This expansion in turn played a major role in the many other transformations—social, political, and cultural—of the early modern age. By 1500 the population in most areas of Europe was increasing after two centuries of decline or stagnation. The bonds of commerce within Europe ...

  2. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › 16th_Century16th century - Wikipedia

    The 16th century is regarded by historians as the century which saw the rise of Western civilization. The Renaissance in Italy and Europe saw the emergence of important artists, authors and scientists, and led to the foundation of important subjects which include accounting and political science.

  3. 26 de mar. de 2024 · The Reformation spread to other European countries over the course of the 16th century. By mid century, Lutheranism dominated northern Europe. Eastern Europe offered a seedbed for even more radical varieties of Protestantism, because kings were weak, nobles strong, and cities few, and because religious pluralism had long existed.

  4. 10 de nov. de 2021 · The Protestant Reformation (1517-1648) refers to the widespread religious, cultural, and social upheaval of 16th-century Europe that broke the hold of the medieval Church, allowing for the development of personal interpretations of the Christian message and leading to the development of modern nation-states.

  5. 2 de dic. de 2009 · The Protestant Reformation was the 16th-century religious, political, intellectual and cultural upheaval that splintered Catholic Europe, setting in place the structures and beliefs that...

  6. applied to late sixteenth-century Italy, needs careful analysis and qualification. There was probably an appreciable increase in the population of western Europe during the sixteenth century, at least in the towns. In the absence of precise statistics it is difficult to be sure of this, and figures derived from

  7. By the middle of the 16th century, Lutheranism had spread into the various principalities and kingdoms of northern Europe. The duchy of Württemberg, after the restoration of Duke Ulrich, adopted reform in 1534; its outstanding reformer was Johannes Brenz and its great centre Tübingen.