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  1. www.bundeswehr.de › organization › branchesInfantry - Bundeswehr

    The infantry is a branch of the Army and belongs to the combat arms. Its soldiers are referred to as infantrymen and women. The infantry includes airborne, mountain and light infantry. With their training and equipment, light infantry troops are capable of fighting in urban or heavily forested terrain. The mountain infantry is trained and ...

  2. List of German corps in World War II. This is a list of German Army corps that existed during World War II . Army (Heer) Infantry corps. I–IX. I Army Corps. II Army Corps. III Army Corps. IV Army Corps. V Army Corps. VI Army Corps. VII Army Corps. VIII Army Corps. IX Army Corps. X–XIX. X Army Corps. XI Army Corps. XII Army Corps. XIII Army Corps.

  3. A corps usually included a light infantry battalion, a heavy artillery (Fußartillerie) battalion, an engineer battalion, a telegraph battalion, and a trains battalion. Some corps areas also disposed of fortress troops; each of the 25 corps had a Field Aviation Unit ( Feldflieger Abteilung ) attached to it normally equipped with six ...

  4. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › German_ArmyGerman Army - Wikipedia

    By March 1954 the Blank Office had finished plans for a new German army. Plans foresaw the formation of six infantry, four armoured, and two mechanised infantry divisions, as the German contribution to the defense of Western Europe in the framework of a European Defence Community.

  5. www.bundeswehr.de › en › organizationArmy - Bundeswehr

    The diversity of the German Army is reflected in its different branches. The women and men in uniform of the individual branches each have their own distinct set of skills and capabilities, yet they are at their strongest and most successful only when they work together. More. The German Army is the core of the land forces and the carrier of ...

  6. The best infantry units in the 1944 German Army were the parachute divisions, administratively under the Luftwaffe but tactically always subordinated to Army command. Until the fall of 1943 German airborne forces comprised only one corps with two parachute divisions.

  7. The German army raised an incredible 315 infantry divisions during World War II—a stunning total, considering that America formed only sixty-six Army infantry divisions plus six for the Marine Corps. An additional eighteen or so Waffen SS infantry divisions augmented the Heer total.