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  1. Earl of Essex is a title in the Peerage of England which was first created in the 12th century by King Stephen of England. The title has been recreated eight times from its original inception, beginning with a new first Earl upon each new creation. Possibly the most well-known Earls of Essex were Thomas Cromwell, chief minister to King Henry VIII, and Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, a favourite of Queen Elizabeth I who led the Earl of Essex Rebellion in 1601. The current ...

    • Elizabeth I and The Earl of Essex
    • The Rise and Fall of Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex
    • The Earl of Essex in Ireland
    • A Bid For Power: The Earl of Essex's Rebellion
    • The End of Queen Elizabeth’s Reign
    • When Did Elizabeth I Die?
    • James I and The Stuart Dynasty
    • Using Our Collections For Research

    Queen Elizabeth I's tempestuous relationship with Robert Devereux, the 2nd Earl of Essex, greatly influenced the latter part of her reign, and resulted in Essex's execution in 1601. After the Armada, the war with Spain continued, problems in Ireland escalated and the death of Elizabeth's closest friends and advisers, including Dudley (1588), Walsin...

    A number of the old guard were replaced by younger relatives, notably Dudley's stepson Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, and Robert Cecil, William Cecil's son. Although Robert Dudley and William Cecil were often at loggerheads over military and religious policy, it was nothing compared to the rivalry and animosity that developed between their son...

    With the death of Dudley, Elizabeth transferred some of her affection to his stepson, and Essex continued the courtier's role of currying favour with the Queen through flattery and flirtation, despite being 34 years her junior. Elizabeth indulged him and put him in charge of a number of important military operations. Essex was tall, handsome and hu...

    In September 1600, the Queen refused to renew the lease and patent on Essex’s farm (provitable control) of wines. Essex was livid and decided to make a bid for power. He and his supporters, mostly disaffected nobles and soldiers, planned to capture the Queen, rid the Council of the 'caterpillars of the Commonwealth' and proclaim James VI her succes...

    The question of succession had been an issue for Queen Elizabeth's government from the moment she came to the throne. Her advancing age heightened these concerns but Elizabeth continued to ban discussion on the matter. Many felt that Elizabeth's cousin and godson, James VI of Scotland and Protestant son of Queen Mary I, had the best claim to the th...

    Surrounded by her Privy Councillors and bishops, Elizabeth died at the age of 69 in the early hours of 24 March 1603. According to the royal chaplain, Dr Henry Parry, it was a 'good death', as ‘hir Majestie departed this lyfe, mildly like a lambe, easily like a ripe apple from the tree...’

    Cecil staged a magnificent funeral for the last and most celebrated Tudor monarch on 28 April 1603. Throngs lined the streets to say their farewells and mourn their dead queen. A few days later, James VI of Scotland rode from Edinburgh to London to take the English throne unchallenged, uniting the two crowns and ushering in the Stuart dynasty.

    The collections at Royal Museums Greenwich offer a world-class resource for researching maritime history, astronomy and time.

  2. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › EssexEssex - Wikipedia

    Essex (/ ˈ ɛ s ɪ k s /) is a county in the East of England. One of the home counties , it borders Suffolk and Cambridgeshire to the north, the North Sea to the east, Hertfordshire to the west, Kent across the estuary of the River Thames to the south, and Greater London to the south and south-west.

  3. 02/02/2001 · Richard Cavendish | Published in History Today Volume 51 Issue 2 February 2001 Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, after Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, was 34 years old when his head fell to the executioner’s axe. He had arrived at Elizabeth I’s court when he was hardly into his twenties.

    • Overview
    • Early life
    • Court and military career
    • Ireland
    • First trial
    • Essex's rebellion

    Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, KG, PC was an English nobleman and a favourite of Queen Elizabeth I. Politically ambitious, and a committed general, he was placed under house arrest following a poor campaign in Ireland during the Nine Years' War in 1599. In 1601, he led an abortive coup d'état against the government of Elizabeth I and was execu...

    Devereux was born on 10 November 1565 at Netherwood near Bromyard, in Herefordshire, the son of Walter Devereux, 1st Earl of Essex, and Lettice Knollys. His maternal great-grandmother Mary Boleyn was a sister of Anne Boleyn, the mother of Queen Elizabeth I, making him a first-cousin-twice-removed of the Queen. He was brought up on his father's esta...

    Devereux first came to court in 1584, and by 1587 had become a favourite of the Queen, who relished his lively mind and eloquence, as well as his skills as a showman and in courtly love. In June 1587 he replaced the Earl of Leicester as Master of the Horse. After Leicester's death in 1588, the Queen transferred the late Earl's royal monopoly on swe...

    Essex's greatest failure was as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, a post which he talked himself into in 1599. The Nine Years' War was in its middle stages, and no English commander had been successful. More military force was required to defeat the Irish chieftains, led by Hugh O'Neill, the Earl of Tyrone, and supplied from Spain and Scotland. Essex led...

    Relying on his general warrant to return to England, given under the great seal, Essex sailed from Ireland on 24 September 1599 and reached London four days later. The Queen had expressly forbidden his return and was surprised when he presented himself in her bedchamber one morning at Nonsuch Palace, before she was properly wigged or gowned. On tha...

    In August, his freedom was granted, but the source of his basic income—the sweet wines monopoly—was not renewed. His situation had become desperate, and he shifted "from sorrow and repentance to rage and rebellion." In early 1601, he began to fortify Essex House, his town mansion on the Strand, and gathered his followers. On the morning of 8 Februa...

    • English
    • Execution
  4. 06/11/2022 · Robert Devereux, 2nd earl of Essex, (born Nov. 10, 1567, Netherwood, Herefordshire, Eng.—died Feb. 25, 1601, London), English soldier and courtier famous for his relationship with Queen Elizabeth I (reigned 1558–1603).

  5. Henry of Essex or Henry de Essex was an Anglo-Norman nobleman who was feudal baron of Rayleigh in Essex and of Haughley in Suffolk. He served as one of the royal constables during the reigns of Kings Stephen and Henry II by right of his second wife, which office included the duty of bearing the royal standard to indicate the location of the king when on campaign or in battle. In 1163 he was convicted as a traitor, having been defeated in trial by battle, and took the habit of a ...