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  1. Lady Maud Hamilton. Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll, VA, CI, GCVO, GBE, RRC, GCStJ (Louisa Caroline Alberta; 18 March 1848 – 3 December 1939) was the sixth child and fourth daughter of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert . In her public life, she was a strong proponent of the arts and higher education and of the feminist cause.

    • Childhood and Education
    • Marriage
    • Arts, Philanthropy and Women’s Rights
    • Vice-Regal Consort of Canada
    • Royal Canadian Academy of Arts
    • National Gallery of Canada
    • Royal Tours
    • Military Regiments
    • Later Life
    • Legacy

    Princess Louise Caroline Alberta was born at Buckingham Palace in London, England. She was the sixth child and fourth daughter of Queen Victoriaand Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. Louise was named after her paternal grandmother, step-great-grandmother and father respectively. Her birth received little public attention because of concern that th...

    On 21 March 1871, Louise married John Campbell, Marquess of Lorne. Louise was the first British princess to marry a non-royal spouse since King Henry VIII’s sister Mary married Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk in 1515. Louise’s brother, the future Edward VII, strongly objected to the match, but Queen Victoriasupported a marriage that would allow he...

    Louise focused her artistic endeavours on sculpture and exhibited her work. Her bust of her brother Prince Arthur was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1869, and her statue of Queen Victoria remains on display outside Kensington Palace. Louise’s marriage allowed her to escape the seclusion of the royal court and engage with other British artists. L...

    On the advice of British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli, Lorne was appointed governor general of Canada in 1878. Prior to his appointment, Lorne was a Member of Parliament in the UK, but his position as the Queen’s son-in-law limited his activities there. The Canadian appointment offered the couple a degree of independence. They arrived in Halifa...

    During the 19th century, Canadian artists often left Canada to establish their reputations, exhibiting their work in the United States or Great Britain. When Louise arrived in Canada, there were provincial societies for artists, but no organizations at the national level where Canadian artists could learn from one another and exhibit their work in ...

    The 1880 exhibition developed into the modern National Gallery of Canada. In 1882, the gallery received its first permanent home, a remodelled builders’ workshop at the Department of Public Works on Parliament Hill. Lorne attended the opening with a large party. The initial collection consisted mostly of diploma works from the newly created Royal C...

    Louise was the first member of the royal family to visit British Columbia, arriving in Victoria with Lorne in 1882. The railway across Canada was not yet complete, so the couple travelled across the United States by train then by ship along the west coast to reach British Columbia. The visit had diplomatic significance because the completion of the...

    A number of Canadian military regiments were named for Louise. The 66th The Halifax Battalion of Infantry became the 66th Battalion “Princess Louise” Fusiliers in 1879. Louise became patron of Ottawa’s cavalry troop, which became the Princess Louise Dragoon Guards in 1903. In 1884, the 8th Regiment of Cavalry became the 8th Princess Louise’s New Br...

    Louise remained engaged with Canada and Canadian institutions after departing the country at the end of Lorne’s tenure as governor general in 1883. During the North-West Resistance of 1885, Louise sent medical supplies to the Battle of Fish Creek and Batoche with instructions that assistance was to be provided for both sides. In 1882, the land that...

    In his 1884 book, Canada Under the Administration of Lord Lorne, J.E. Collins recalled: “Those who come into contact with the princess, never weary of telling that she was a true and noble woman, always desirous of doing well for her kind, eager in giving assistance to every project of art and education, not less than her husband generally interest...

  2. Princess Louise was Queen Victoria's sixth child. Born March 18 1848, Louise was deemed "peculiar" as she had "so many difficulties to contend with" - she was born among many revolutions...

  3. She had a notoriously difficult relationship with her mother, whose domineering influence remained strong, even into adulthood — she had to battle for permission to attend art school, yet today her sculptures decorate some of the greatest houses of London. Louise is perhaps best known, though, for her colourful love life.

  4. Bold Facts About Princess Louise, The Rebel Daughter Of Queen Victoria Born on the eve of Europe’s first wave of Revolutions, Queen Victoria knew that her daughter Princess Louise was bound to be special. And special she was. Princess Louise was a precocious child who matured into a controversial, mysterious revolutionary.

  5. 29 de dic. de 2013 · The Mystery of Princess Louise: Queen Victoria's Rebellious Daughter by Lucinda Hawksley – review This life of a spirited princess who thrived despite her upbringing is both revealing and...