Yahoo Search Búsqueda en la Web

  1. Cerca de 9 resultados de búsqueda
  1. Hace 1 día · The Fatimid dynasty was an Isma'ili Shi'a dynasty that ruled an extensive empire, the Fatimid Caliphate, between 909 and 1171 CE. Claiming descent from Fatima and Ali, they also held the Isma'ili imamate, claiming to be the rightful leaders of the Muslim community.

  2. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › PaduaPadua - Wikipedia

    • Etymology
    • History
    • Geography
    • Main Sights
    • Culture
    • Demographics
    • Government
    • Consulates
    • Economy
    • Transport

    The original significance of the Roman name Patavium (Venetian: Padoa) is uncertain. It may be connected with Padus, the ancient name of the River Po. Additionally, the Indo-European root pat- may refer to a wide open plain as opposed to nearby hills. (In Latin this root is present in the word patera which means "plate" and the verb patere meaning ...

    Antiquity

    Padua claims to be among the oldest cities in northern Italy. According to a tradition dated at least to the time of Virgil's Aeneid and to Livy's Ab Urbe Condita, Padua was founded around 1183 BC by the Trojan prince Antenor. After the Fall of Troy, Antenor led a group of Trojans and their Paphlagonian allies, the Eneti or Veneti, who lost their king Pylaemenes to settle the Euganean plain in Italy. Thus, when a large ancient stone sarcophagus was exhumed in the year 1274, officials of the m...

    Late Antiquity

    The history of Padua during Late Antiquity follows the course of events common to most cities of north-eastern Italy. Padua suffered from the invasion of the Huns and was savagely sacked by Attila in 450. A number of years afterward, it fell under the control of the Gothic kings Odoacer and Theodoric the Great. It was reconquered for a short time by the Byzantine Empire in 540 during the Gothic War. However, depopulation from plague and war ensued. The city was again seized by the Goths under...

    Frankish and Episcopal Supremacy

    At the Diet of Aix-la-Chapelle (828), the duchy and march of Friuli, in which Padua lay, was divided into four counties, one of which took its title from the city of Padua. The end of the early Middle Ages in Padua was marked by the sack of the city by the Magyarsin 899. It was many years before Padua recovered from this ravage. During the period of episcopal supremacy over the cities of northern Italy, Padua does not appear to have been either very important or very active. The general tende...

    Climate

    Padua experiences a humid subtropical climate (Köppen climate classification Cfa) characteristic of northern Italy, modified by the nearby Adriatic Sea.

    The Scrovegni Chapel (Italian: Cappella degli Scrovegni) is Padua's most notable sight. It houses a cycle of frescoes completed in 1305 by Giotto. It was commissioned by Enrico degli Scrovegni, a w...
    The Palazzo della Ragione, with its great hall on the upper floor, is reputed to have the largest roof unsupported by columns in Europe; the hall is nearly rectangular, its length 81.5 m (267.39 ft...
    In the Piazza dei Signori is the loggia called the Gran Guardia, (1493–1526), and close by is the Palazzo del Capitaniato, the residence of the Venetian governors, with its great door, the work of...
    The Teatro Verdiis host to performances of operas, musicals, plays, ballets, and concerts.

    Padua has long been acclaimed for its university, founded in 1222. Under the rule of Venice the university was governed by a board of three patricians, called the Riformatori dello Studio di Padova.The list of notable professors and alumni is long, containing, among others, the names of Bembo, Sperone Speroni, the anatomist Vesalius, Copernicus, Fa...

    In 2007, there were 210,301 people residing in Padua, located in the province of Padua, Veneto, of whom 47.1% were male and 52.9% were female. Minors (children ages 18 and younger) totalled 14.87% of the population compared to pensioners who number 23.72%. This compares with the Italian average of 18.06% (minors) and 19.94% (pensioners). The averag...

    Since local government political reorganization in 1993, Padua has been governed by the City Council of Padua. Voters elect directly 33 councilors and the Mayor of Padua every five years.The current Mayor of Padua is Sergio Giordani (independent, supported by the PD), elected on 26 June 2017. This is a list of the mayors of Padua since 1946: *Speci...

    Padua hosts consulates for several nations, including those of Canada, Croatia, Ivory Coast, Peru, Poland, Switzerland and Uruguay. A consulate for South Korea was planned in 2014 and a consulate for Moldovawas opened on 1 August 2014.

    The industrial area of Padova was created in the eastern part of the city in 1946; it is now one of the biggest industrial zones in Europe, having an area of 11 million sqm. The main offices of 1,300 industries are based here, employing 50,000 people. In the industrial zone, there are two railway stations, one fluvial port, three truck terminals, t...

    By car

    By car, there are 2 motorways (autostrade in Italian): A4 Brescia-Padova, connecting it to Verona (then to Brenner Pass, Innsbruck and Bavaria) and Milan (then Switzerland, Turin and France); A4 Padova-Venezia, to Venice then Belluno (for Dolomites holiday resorts like Cortina) Trieste and Tarvisio (for Austria, Slovenia, Croatia and Eastern Europe); A13 Bologna-Padova, to Ferrara and Bologna (then Central and South Italy). Roads connect Padua with all the large and small centers of the regio...

    By rail

    Padua has two railway stations open to passengers. The main station Stazione di Padova has 11 platforms and is sometimes incorrectly referred to as "Padova Centrale"; it is one of the biggest stations in Italy. More than 450 trains per day leave Padova. The station is used by over 20 million passengers per year. Other railway stations are Padova Ponte di Brenta (soon to be closed), Padova San Lazzaro (planned), Padova Campo di Marte, with no passenger service once used as a freight station wh...

    By aeroplane

    Padua is approximately 50 km (31 mi) away from Venice Marco Polo Airport which is the nearest airport with regular commercial service. Padua is also serviced by the Verona Villafranca Airport, Treviso Airport and Bologna Guglielmo Marconi Airport. The Gino Allegri, or Aeroporto civile di Padova "Gino Allegri", is no longer served by regularly scheduled flights. Padua is, however, the home of one of Italy's four area control centres.

    • 12 m (39 ft)
    • Padua (PD)
    • History
    • Conservation
    • Foundation
    • Music
    • Bells
    • Library
    • References
    • External Links

    Roman

    Tertullian refers to Christians in Briton as early as 208 AD. Origen mentions the church in 238 AD and in 314 England sent three Bishops to the Council of Arles. There is a medieval London tradition that St Peter upon Cornhill church in London was the seat of English Christianity until the founding of Canterbury in 597 AD. Whether this is true or not has not yet been established. However, St Peter's is positioned directly above the potential location of a pagan Aedes (or shrine room) in the g...

    Early Medieval

    Bede recorded that Augustine reused a former Roman church. The oldest remains found during excavations beneath the present nave in 1993 were, however, parts of the foundations of an Anglo-Saxon building, which had been constructed across a Roman road. They indicate that the original church consisted of a nave, possibly with a narthex, and side-chapels to the north and south. A smaller subsidiary building was found to the south-west of these foundations. During the 9th or 10th century this chu...

    Norman

    The cathedral was destroyed by fire in 1067, a year after the Norman Conquest. Rebuilding began in 1070 under the first Norman archbishop, Lanfranc (1070–1077). He cleared the ruins and reconstructed the cathedral to a design based closely on that of the Abbey of Saint-Étienne in Caen, where he had previously been abbot, using stone brought from France. The new church, its central axis about 5m south of that of its predecessor,was a cruciform building, with an aisled nave of nine bays, a pair...

    Much of the stonework at Canterbury Cathedral is damaged and crumbling, the roofs are leaking and much of the stained glass is badly corroded. The last quinquennial structural reviewrevealed that a combination of centuries of weathering, pollution and constant use had taken its toll on the ancient building and some serious problems were in need of ...

    The Foundation is the authorised staffing establishment of the cathedral, few of whom are clergy. The head of the cathedral is the Dean, currently Robert Willis, who is assisted by a chapter of 30 canons, four of whom are residentiary, the others being honorary appointments of senior clergy in the diocese. There are also a number of lay canons who ...

    Organ

    The organ at Canterbury is of four manuals and is in both south and the north quire aisles, as well as a nave division. It was built in 1886 by Henry Willis and subsequently rebuilt by the same firm in the mid-20th century. It was rebuilt by N. P. Mander in 1978 and reduced to three manuals at about that time. David Flood, Organist and Master of the Choristers for over 40 years, oversaw the redesign, specification and total expansion and rebuilding project of the Cathedral Organ in 2018-2020T...

    Organists

    Organists and assistant organists at Canterbury Cathedral have included composers Clement Charlton Palmer, Gerald Hocken Knight and Philip Moore and musical directors Allan Wicks and Stephen Darlington. Following 42 years as both Assistant Organist and Organist and Master of the Choristers, David Flood retired on 29 December 2020. Following 10 years as Assistant Organist and latterly Director of the Girls' Choir and a period as Acting Director of Music, David Newsholme was appointed Director...

    Choirs

    There has been a choral tradition at Canterbury Cathedral for 1400 years. The cathedral choir consists of 25 boy choristers and 12 lay clerks. The boys are aged eight to thirteen. They receive scholarships and attend St Edmund's School, Canterbury.There are seven choral services a week with Choral Evensong at 5:30 pm Monday through Friday, with the boys alone on Thursday and men on Wednesday. On Saturday and Sunday, there is evensong at 3:15 pm and Eucharist on Sunday at 11 am. There are nume...

    The cathedral has a total of 21 bells in the three towers: The South West Tower (Oxford Tower) contains the cathedral's main ring of bells, hung for change ringing in the English style. There are fourteen bells – a ring of twelve with two semitones, which allow for ringing on ten, eight or six bells while still remaining in tune. All of the bells w...

    The cathedral library has a collection of about 30,000 books and pamphlets printed before the 20th century and about 20,000 later books and serials. Many of the earlier books were acquired as part of donated collections. It is rich in church history, older theology, British history (including local history), travel, science and medicine, and the an...

    Notes

    1. This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Abbey/Canterbury Cathedral". Encyclopædia Britannica(11th ed.). Cambridge University Press.

    • England
    • 1070, 1834 (last major alteration)
  3. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Ge_wareGe ware - Wikipedia

    Hace 1 día · Ge ware or Ko ware (Chinese: 哥窯; pinyin: Gē yáo; Wade–Giles: Ko-yao) is a type of celadon or greenware in Chinese pottery.It was one of the Five Great Kilns of the Song dynasty recognised by later Chinese writers, but has remained rather mysterious to modern scholars, with much debate as to which surviving pieces, if any, actually are Ge ware, whether they actually come from the Song ...

  4. Hace 1 día · Zur Navigation springen Zur Suche springen. Die folgende Liste enthält in der Denkmalliste ausgewiesene Baudenkmäler auf dem Gebiet des Bonner Ortsteils Südstadt im Stadtbezirk Bonn . Hinweis: Die Reihenfolge der Denkmäler in dieser Liste orientiert sich an den Straßennamen und ist alternativ nach Hausnummern, Denkmallistennummer oder ...

  5. hace 2 días · The State of Damascus was a French mandate from 1920 to 1925. The capital was Damascus. The primarily Sunni population of the states of Aleppo and Damascus were strongly opposed to the division of Syria. This resulted in its quick end in 1925, when France united the states of Aleppo and Damascus into the State of Syria. Sanjak of Alexandretta