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  1. 18 de ene. de 2023 · It was purchased for £2,500 in 1909 by Andrew Bonar Law, the Conservative politician and later Prime Minister, who lived there until 1917, when he moved to No. 11 Downing Street following his appointment as Chancellor of the Exchequer in the previous December. Pembroke Lodge was subsequently used as a convalescent home for wounded officers.

  2. 24 de ene. de 2023 · The Conservative leader, Andrew Bonar Law, came very close to openly backing armed insurrection in Ireland to thwart the UK’s elected government. Churchill growled back that the will of parliament would be physically enforced if need be, because “there were worse things than bloodshed, even on an extended scale”.

  3. 31 de dic. de 2022 · In May 1923, Conservative Prime Minister Andrew Bonar Law stood down after just a few months in office to be replaced by his Chancellor of the Exchequer, Stanley Baldwin.

  4. 24 de ene. de 2023 · There he befriended Bonar Law and with his support won a seat in the House of Commons at the general election held in December 1910. A knighthood followed shortly after. During World War I, he ran the Canadian Records office in London and played a role in the removal of H. H. Asquith as prime minister in 1916.

  5. 2 de ene. de 2023 · Jan. 2, 1923: British PM Andrew Bonar Law (1st photo, center) and Belgian PM Georges Theunis (2nd photo, front left) at the Quai d’Orsay in Paris for talks with France and Italy on Germany’s failure to pay war reparations.

  6. 24 de ene. de 2023 · The printed maps of Ireland 1612-1850 by Andrew Bonar Law. Publication Date: 1997. A Paper Landscape by J. H. Andrews. ISBN: 1851826645. Publication Date: 2002. In 1824, the Ordnance Survey was directed to map Ireland (as a prelude to a nationwide valuation of land and buildings) as quickly as possible on the large scale of six inches to the mile.

  7. The Conservative leader, Andrew Bonar Law, came very close to openly backing armed insurrection in Ireland to thwart the UK’s elected government. Churchill growled back that the will of parliament would be physically enforced if need be, because “there were worse things than bloodshed, even on an extended scale”.