Yahoo Search Búsqueda en la Web

  1. Cerca de 31.900 resultados de búsqueda
  1. Anuncio
    relacionado con: Benedictus de Spinoza
  1. Baruch Spinoza ( Ámsterdam, 24 de noviembre de 1632 - La Haya, 21 de febrero de 1677) fue un filósofo neerlandés de origen sefardí hispano - portugués. También se le conoce como Baruj, Bento, Benito, Benedicto o Benedictus (de) Spinoza o Espinosa, según las distintas traducciones de su nombre basadas en las hipótesis sobre su origen.

    • Baruj Espinosa
    • Benedito de Espinosa
  2. 30/10/2018 · Baruch Spinoza, llamado originalmente Benedictus (en Latin) o Bento de Spinoza (En portugués), nació el 24 de noviembre de 1632 en Amsterdam. Sus padres eran judíos que habían emigrado a España y posteriormente a Portugal. Allí fueron obligados a convertirse al cristianismo, aunque continuaron practicando el judaísmo a escondidas.

    • Legacy
    • Philosophy
    • Early years
    • Education
    • Activities
    • Writing
    • Later life
    • Reception
    • Later years
    • Death and legacy
    • Death
    • Style
    • Definitions
    • Quotes
    • Properties
    • Usage
    • Controversy
    • Variants
    • Significance
    • Introduction

    Benedict de Spinoza was among the most important of the post-Cartesian philosophers who flourished in the second half of the 17th century. He made significant contributions in virtually every area of philosophy, and his writings reveal the influence of such divergent sources as Stoicism, Jewish Rationalism, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Descartes, and a var...

    Among philosophers, Spinoza is best known for his Ethics, a monumental work that presents an ethical vision unfolding out of a monistic metaphysics in which God and Nature are identified. God is no longer the transcendent creator of the universe who rules it via providence, but Nature itself, understood as an infinite, necessary, and fully determin...

    Spinoza came into the world a Jew. Born in 1632, he was the son of Marrano parents. They had immigrated to Amsterdam from Portugal in order to escape the Inquisition that had spread across the Iberian Peninsula and live in the relatively tolerant atmosphere of Holland. Spinoza's father, Michael, was a successful merchant and a respected member of t...

    The young Spinoza, given the name Baruch, was educated in his congregation's academy, the Talmud Torah school. There he received the kind of education that the community deemed necessary to constitute one as an educated Jew. This largely consisted of religious study , including instruction in Hebrew, liturgy, Torah, prophetic writings, and rabbinic...

    Little is known about Spinoza's activities in the years immediately following his excommunication. He continued his studies with Van den Enden and occasionally took up residence in his teacher's home. As it was now impossible for him to carry on in commerce, it was most likely at this time that he took up lens grinding as an occupation. There is al...

    It was during this same period, in the late 1650's, that Spinoza embarked upon his literary career. His first work, the Treatise on the Emendation of the Intellect, is an attempt to formulate a philosophical method that would allow the mind to form the clear and distinct ideas that are necessary for its perfection. It contains, in addition, reflect...

    Spinoza's stay in Rijnsburg was brief. In 1663 he moved to the town of Voorburg, not far from The Hague, where he settled into a quiet, but busy, life. At the behest of friends, he immediately set about preparing for publication a set of lessons that he had given to a student in Leiden on Descartes's Principles of Philosophy. The result was the onl...

    As was to be expected, the Theological-Political Treatise was met with a firestorm of criticism. It was condemned as a work of evil, and its author was accused of having nefarious intentions in writing it. Even some of Spinoza's closest friends were deeply unsettled by it. Though he had assiduously tried to avoid it, Spinoza found himself embroiled...

    Spinoza's last move, in 1670, was to The Hague, where he was to live out his remaining years. Besides having to deal with fallout from his Theological-Political Treatise, he witnessed a political revolution that culminated in the murder of the Grand Pensionary of Holland, Jan De Witt, along with his brother, Cornelius, by an angry mob of Orangist-C...

    By this time Spinoza was in a state of failing health. Weakened by a respiratory illness, he devoted the last year of his life to writing a work of political philosophy, his Political Treatise. Though left unfinished at his death, Spinoza's intention was to show how governments of all types could be improved and to argue for the superiority of demo...

    Spinoza died peacefully in his rented room in The Hague in 1677. He left no will, but the manuscripts of his unpublished worksthe Treatise on the Emendation of the Intellect, the Ethics, the Hebrew Grammar, and the Political Treatise along with his correspondencewere found in in his desk. These were immediately shipped to Amsterdam for publication,...

    Upon opening Spinoza's masterpiece, the Ethics, one is immediately struck by its form. It is written in the style of a geometrical treatise, much like Euclid's Elements, with each book comprising a set of definitions, axioms, propositions, scholia, and other features that make up the formal apparatus of geometry. One wonders why Spinoza would have ...

    Among the eight definitions that open Book One of the Ethics, the following four are most important to the argument for substance monism: This definition has two components. First, a substance is what exists in itself. This is to say that it is an ultimate metaphysical subject. While other things may exist as features of a substance, substance does...

    ID3: By substance I understand what is in itself and is conceived through itself, that is, that whose concept does not require the concept of another thing, from which it must be formed. IP11: God, or a substance consisting of infinite attributes, each of which expresses eternal and infinite essence, necessarily exists. IP14: Except God, no substan...

    An attribute is not just any property of a substance - it is its very essence. So close is the association of an attribute and the substance of which it is an attribute that Spinoza denies that there is a real distinction between them.

    Spinoza moves from these definitions to demonstrate a series of propositions concerning substance in general and God in particular on the basis of which he will demonstrate that God is the one and only substance. The following two propositions are landmarks in the overall argument and are explicitly invoked in the demonstration of IP14:

    In support of this proposition, Spinoza argues that if two or more substances were to exist they would be differentiated either by a difference in modes or by a difference in attributes. However, they could not be differentiated by a difference in modes, for substances are prior in nature to their modes. Thus, they would have to be differentiated b...

    In support of this proposition, Spinoza offers a variant of the so-called Ontological Argument. The basic consideration upon which this variant rests is that it pertains to the nature of substance to exist. Spinoza establishes this earlier, in IP7, by appealing to the fact that substances, being entirely dissimilar to one another, cannot produce on...

    The demonstration of this proposition is exceedingly simple. God exists (by IP11). Since God possesses every attribute (by ID6), if any substance other than God were to exist, it would possess an attribute in common with God. But, since there cannot be two or more substances with a common attribute (by IP5), there can be no substance other than God...

    In view of the ontological unity that exists between God and the modal system, Spinoza is careful to specify that the divine causality is immanent rather that transitive. What this means is that God's causal activity does not pass outside of the divine substance to produce external effects, as it would if God were a creator in the traditional sense...

  3. Freud, Darwin, Einstein y muchos otros han confesado su dependencia de la obra de Spinoza, y un mundo secular creciente le fue transformando en su profeta. No perteneció a ninguna escuela y tampoco fundó ninguna.

  4. Baruch (Benedictus) Spinoza (1632-1677) Filósofo materialista neerlandés. Por su independencia de espíritu en materia religiosa fue expulsado de la comunidad confesional hebrea de Amsterdam. Obras principales: Tratado teológico-político y Ética. Spinoza es el creador del método geométrico en filosofía.

  5. Baruch Spinoza Baruch Spinoza nació el 24 de noviembre de 1632, en Ámsterdam, Holanda. Familia Segundo de los cuatro hijos de Hanna Debora Marques, y de Miguel de Espinoza, comerciante y alcaide de la sinagoga y de la escuela judía de Ámsterdam. Se crio en el seno de una familia de judíos hispanoportugueses.