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  1. Richard of York, 3rd Duke of York (21 September 1411 – 30 December 1460), also named Richard Plantagenet, was a leading English magnate and claimant to the throne during the Wars of the Roses. He was a member of the ruling House of Plantagenet by virtue of being a direct male line descendant of Edmund of Langley, Edward III ’s fourth surviving son.

  2. Richard III (2 October 1452 – 22 August 1485) was King of England and Lord of Ireland from 26 June 1483 until his death in 1485. He was the last king of the House of York and the last of the Plantagenet dynasty. His defeat and death at the Battle of Bosworth Field, the last decisive battle of the Wars of the Roses, marked the end of the Middle Ages ...

  3. English: Richard of York, 3rd Duke of York (Variant). The inescutcheon of pretence showing the arms of the House of Holland, Earls of Kent, represents his claim to represent that family, derived from his maternal grandmother Eleanor Holland (1373-1405), one of the six daughters and eventual co-heiresses to their father Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent (1350/4-1397)

    • 19 de julio de 2013, 01:45:23
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    • English: Richard of York, 3rd Duke of York (Variant). The inescutcheon of pretence showing the arms of the House of Holland, Earls of Kent, represents his claim to represent that family, derived from his maternal grandmother Eleanor Holland (1373-1405), one of the six daughters and eventual co-heiresses to their father Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent (1350/4-1397)
    • Renovation
    • Quote
    • What Does Loveday Mean Here?
    • Burial Location Inconsistant
    • Descent and Claim to The Throne
    • External Links Modified
    • Prince of Wales?
    • Can We Get A Source For His Son John's Date of Death?

    I'd like to renovate this page, as I think it doesn't do justice to one of the most important characters of mid fifteenth-century England. However, my only contribution to Wikipedia so far is the page on William Neville, so I've never updated any else's work. If anyone would like to give me any advice or make any comments on how to do this without ...

    The section of Saint Albans starts with the quote "If Henry's insanity was a tragedy, his recovery was a national disaster". Who said that? We should clarify this since this opinion has to be clearly attributed to avoid POV issues.--RR' (talk) 11:36, 24 January 2008 (UTC)[reply] The quote is from Storey "The End of the House of Lancaster" - first s...

    Quote: Henry's attempts at reconciliation between the factions divided by the killings at St Albans reached their climax with the Loveday on 24 March, 1458. According to the article of Loveday, I do not understand what it means here. The phrase "WITH THE Loveday" makes it unlike a name of a certain place.Heinrich ⅩⅦ von Bayern (talk) 13:07, 27 Augu...

    Cecily's Wikipedia page says buried with Richard at Church of St Mary and All Saints.Richard's Wikipedia page says he was buried at Pontefract Castle. Which is it? Mellie107 (talk) 07:03, 29 February 2012 (UTC)[reply] English Monarchs (http://www.englishmonarchs.co.uk/fotheringhay.html) says Edward IV moved his father's remains to the Church of St ...

    The current article contains: 1. After some hesitation Henry V allowed Richard to inherit his uncle's title and (at his majority) the lands of the Duchy of York. The lesser title and (in due course) greater estates of the Earldom of March also became his on the death of his maternal uncle Edmund Mortimer, 5th Earl of March, on 19 January 1425. The ...

    Hello fellow Wikipedians, I have just modified one external link on Richard of York, 3rd Duke of York. Please take a moment to review my edit. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit this simple FaQfor additional information. I made the following changes: 1. Added archive https://web.arch...

    How was Richard Prince of Wales? GoodDay (talk) 13:42, 27 April 2018 (UTC)[reply] 1. @GoodDay: Hmmm, it's because he was named the King's heir in parliament. This particular wording was added in July 2013; but it is only sourced to a primary source, which is not wholly compatable with WP:PTS. From a cursory re-reading of the relevant chapter, the m...

    The 8th child in the list of his children is John of York and as of the date and time of this talk-page edit it is saying he lived until 1512. That is a bit unlikely because he would have been given a Title of Nobility like his brothers. There are Internet sites that say he died in the year after he was born. Why wouldn't we have more information a...

  4. Richard_Plantagenet,_3rd_Duke_of_York.jpg ‎ (251 × 480 píxeles; tamaño de archivo: 126 kB; tipo MIME: image/jpeg) Este es un archivo de Wikimedia Commons , un depósito de contenido libre hospedado por la Fundación Wikimedia .

  5. Edmondo di Langley, I duca di York; Guerra delle due rose; Riccardo Plantageneto, III duca di York; Duca di York; Edoardo di Norwich, II duca di York; Riccardo di Conisburgh; Template:York (1385-1461) Costanza di York; Margherita di York; Anna di York; Giorgio Plantageneto, I duca di Clarence; Elisabetta di York (1444-1503) Ver más uso global de este archivo.

  6. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Duke_of_YorkDuke of York - Wikipedia

    Duke of York is a title of nobility in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. Since the 15th century, it has, when granted, usually been given to the second son of English monarchs. The equivalent title in the Scottish peerage was Duke of Albany. However, King George II and Queen Victoria granted the second sons of their eldest sons the titles Duke of York and Albany and Duke of York respectively. Initially granted in the 14th century in the Peerage of England, the title Duke of York ...