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  1. Like many of the world's languages, the Welsh language has seen an increased use and presence on the internet, ranging from formal lists of terminology in a variety of fields to Welsh language interfaces for Microsoft Windows XP and up, Microsoft Office, LibreOffice, OpenOffice.org, Mozilla Firefox and a variety of Linux distributions, and on-line services to blogs kept in Welsh.

  2. El galés ( autoglotónimo: Cymraeg) es un idioma perteneciente al grupo britónico de la familia de lenguas celtas. Es hablado en el país de Gales, donde aproximadamente 857 600 personas (el 28 % de la población galesa) lo utilizan como su lengua principal, especialmente en la zona norte del país. El galés es el idioma oficial junto con el inglés.

  3. In Welsh, it is known as Cymraeg, or yr iaith Gymraeg, which means "the Welsh language". Welsh is still spoken throughout the region: around 21% of the people of Wales (about 600,000 people), as well as some people outside Wales, including those in nearby England, can speak Welsh. Many people in Wales say they can understand some form of Welsh, such as spoken, written, or can read Welsh, even if they do not speak it all the time.

    • Origins
    • Primitive Welsh
    • Old Welsh
    • Middle Welsh
    • Early Modern Welsh
    • Late Modern Welsh Begins
    • 19th Century
    • 20th Century
    • 21st Century
    • References

    Welsh evolved from British, the Celtic language spoken by the ancient Britons. Alternatively classified as Insular Celtic or P-Celtic, it probably arrived in Britain during the Bronze Age or Iron Age and was probably spoken throughout the island south of the Firth of Forth. During the Early Middle Ages, the British language began to fragment due to...

    Kenneth H. Jackson suggested that the evolution in syllabic structure and sound pattern was complete by around 550, and labelled the period between then and about 800 "Primitive Welsh". This Primitive Welsh may have been spoken in both Wales and the Hen Ogledd ("Old North"), the Brythonic-speaking areas of what is now northern England and southern ...

    The Welsh language in documents predating around 1150. The earliest Welsh poetry – that attributed to the Cynfeirddor "Early Poets" – is generally considered to date to the Primitive Welsh period. However, much of this poetry was supposedly composed in the Hen Ogledd, raising further questions about the dating of the material and language in which ...

    Middle Welsh (Cymraeg Canol) is the label attached to the Welsh of the 12th to 14th centuries, of which much more remains than for any earlier period. This is the language of nearly all surviving early manuscripts of the Mabinogion, although the tales themselves are certainly much older. It is also the language of the existing Welsh lawmanuscripts....

    Modern Welsh can be divided into two periods. The first, Early Modern Welshran from the early 15th century to roughly the end of the 16th century. In the Early Modern Welsh Period, the Welsh language began to be restricted in its use, such as with the passing of Henry VIII's 1536 Act of Union. Through this Act Wales was governed solely under Englis...

    Late Modern Welsh began with the publication of William Morgan's translation of the Bible in 1588. Like its English counterpart, the King James Version, this proved to have a strong stabilizing effect on the language, and indeed the language today still bears the same Late Modernlabel as Morgan's language. Of course, many changes have occurred sinc...

    The 19th century was a critical period in the history of the Welsh language and one that encompassed many contradictions. In 1800 Welsh was the main spoken language of the vast majority of Wales, with the only exceptions being some border areas and other places which had seen significant settlement, such as south Pembrokeshire; by the 1901 census, ...

    Early census findings

    By the 20th century, the numbers of Welsh speakers were shrinking at a rate that suggested that the language would be extinct within a few generations. According to the 1911 census, out of a population of just under 2.5 million, 43.5% of those aged three years and upwards in Wales and Monmouthshire spoke Welsh (8.5% monoglotWelsh speakers, 35% bilingual in English and Welsh). This was a decrease from the 1891 census with 49.9% speaking Welsh out of a population of 1.5 million (15.1% monoglot,...

    1921 Census and the founding of Plaid Cymru

    The 1921 census recorded that of the population of Wales (including Monmouthshire,) 38.7% of the population could speak Welsh while 6.6% of the overall population were Welsh monoglots. In the five predominantly Welsh-speaking counties, Welsh was spoken by more than 75% of the population, and was more widely understood than English: 1. Anglesey: 87.8% could speak Welsh while 67.9% could speak English 2. Cardiganshire: 86.8% could speak Welsh, 72.4% could speak English 3. Carmarthenshire: 84.5%...

    Tân yn Llŷn 1936

    Concern for the Welsh language was ignited in 1936 when the UK government decided to build an RAF training camp and aerodrome at Penyberth on the Llŷn Peninsula in Gwynedd. The events surrounding the protest became known as Tân yn Llŷn (Fire in Llŷn). The UK government had settled on Llŷn as the location for this military site after plans for similar bases in Northumberland and Dorsethad met with protests. However, UK Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin refused to hear the case against basing this...

    Plaid Cymru

    In a speech at the 2000 National Eisteddfod at Llanelli, Cynog Dafis, Plaid Cymru AM, called for a new Welsh-language movement with greater powers to lobby for the Welsh language at the Assembly, UK, and EU levels. Dafis felt the needs of the language were ignored during the first year of the Assembly, and that to ensure the dynamic growth of the Welsh language a properly resourced strategy was needed. In his speech Dafis encouraged other Welsh-language advocacy groups to work more closely to...

    Census data

    See: Welsh-speaking population In the 1991 census, the Welsh language stabilised at the 1981 level of 18.7%. According to the 2001 census, the number of Welsh speakers in Wales increased for the first time in over 100 years, with 20.8% in a population of over 2.9 million claiming fluency in Welsh. Further, 28% of the population of Wales claimed to understand Welsh. The census revealed that the increase was most significant in urban areas, such as Cardiff with an increase from 6.6% in 1991 to...

    Second-home crisis

    The decline in Welsh speakers in Gwynedd and Ynys Môn may be attributable to non-Welsh-speaking people moving to North Wales, driving up property prices to levels that local Welsh speakers cannot afford, according to former Gwynedd county councillor Seimon Glyn of Plaid Cymru. Glyn was commenting on a report underscoring the dilemma of rocketing house prices outstripping what locals could pay, with the report warning that "...traditional Welsh communities could die out..." as a consequence. M...

    Bibliography

    1. Ballinger, John, The Bible in Wales: A Study in the History of the Welsh People, London, Henry Sotheran & Co., 1906. 2. Davies, John, A History of Wales, Penguin, 1994, ISBN 0-14-014581-8, Page 547 3. Koch, John T. (2006). Celtic Culture: A Historical Encyclopedia. ABC-CLIO.

  4. The Welsh Wikipedia (Welsh: Wicipedia Cymraeg) is the Welsh-language edition of Wikipedia. This edition was started in July 2003. On 23 June 2007, it reached 10,000 articles, the 66th Wikipedia to do so. On 20 November 2008, it attained 20,000 articles. Less than a year later, on 28 October 2009, it reached 25,000 articles.