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  1. 09/06/2022 · Frederick William Villiers, Viscount Villiers (1734–1742) George Bussy Villiers, 4th Earl of Jersey (1735–1805) George Child-Villiers, 5th Earl of Jersey (1773–1859) George Augustus Frederick Child-Villiers, 6th Earl of Jersey (1808–1859) Victor Albert George Child-Villiers, 7th Earl of Jersey (1845–1915)

    • Early Life
    • Ascent at Court
    • Relationship with James I
    • Influence Under James I
    • Charles I, The Lord Admiral and Foreign Affairs
    • Assassination
    • Self-Promotion Through The Arts
    • Marriage and Children
    • Legacy
    • Fictional Appearances

    Villiers was born in Brooksby, Leicestershire, on 28 August 1592, the son of the minor gentleman Sir George Villiers (1550–1606). His mother Mary (1570–1632), daughter of Anthony Beaumont of Glenfield, Leicestershire, widowed early, educated her son for a courtier's life. She sent him to travel in France with John Eliot. Villiers took to the traini...

    In August 1614, at age twenty-one, Villiers caught the eye of King James I at a hunt in Apethorpe. Opponents of the king's favourite Robert Carr, Earl of Somerset, saw an opportunity to displace Somerset and began promoting Villiers. Money was raised to purchase Villiers a new wardrobe, and intense lobbying secured his appointment as Royal Cup-bear...

    Villiers was the last in a succession of handsome young favourites on whom the king lavished affection and patronage. The extent to which the relationship between the two was sexual has been much discussed. James's nickname for Buckingham was "Steenie", after St. Stephen who was said to have had "the face of an angel". Speaking to the Privy Council...

    Until James I died in 1625, Buckingham was the king's constant companion and closest advisor, enjoying control of all royal patronage. Buckingham used his influence to prodigiously enrich his relatives and advance their social positions, which soured public opinion towards him. In his rise to power, Buckingham became connected with the philosopher ...

    In 1623 Buckingham, now Lord Admiral and effective Foreign Minister, accompanied Charles I, then Prince of Wales, to Spain for marriage negotiations regarding the Infanta Maria. The negotiations had long been stuck, but it is believed that Buckingham's crassness was key to the total collapse of agreement, and they returned in a black mood. The Span...

    During the course of his incompetent leadership, Parliament had twice attempted to impeach the duke. The king had rescued him by dissolving it both times, but public feeling was so inflamed as a result that he was widely blamed as a public enemy. Eventually his physician, Dr Lambe, popularly supposed to assert a diabolic influence over him, was mob...

    As a means of manoeuvring for political as well as court advancement, Villiers commissioned masques in which he was able to promote himself in a leading role. By appearing there as a dancer himself his grace of movement and beauty of body was put on show. By 1618 his elevation in rank allowed him to dance side by side with the royal heir, with whom...

    Buckingham married the daughter of the 6th Earl of Rutland, Lady Katherine Manners, later suo jure Baroness de Ros, on 16 May 1620, against her father's objections. The children of this marriage were: 1. Mary Villiers (before 30 March 1622 – November 1685), married firstly Charles Herbert, Lord Herbert, secondly James Stewart, 1st Duke of Richmonda...

    During the duke's short tenure as Chancellor of the University of Cambridge, he had initiated the purchase of Thomas van Erpe's collection of oriental books and manuscripts on its behalf, although his widow only transferred it to Cambridge University Library after his death. With it came the first book in Chineseto be added to the Library's collect...

    A fictionalised Buckingham is one of the characters in Alexandre Dumas's celebrated 1844 novel Les Trois Mousquetaires (The Three Musketeers), which paints him as in love with Anne of Austriaas well as dealing with the siege of La Rochelle and his assassination by Felton. He is described: In the 1973 two-film, Anglo-American adaptation of the book—...

  2. 27/06/2022 · EDWARD, eldest son of Sir Edward Villiers, was, March 20, in the 3d year of king William and queen Mary, created viscount Villiers of Dartford, and baron Hoo, in this county; and in 1697, earl of Jersey; which titles are now possessed by his great grandson, George Bussy Villiers, earl of Jersey, &c.

    • Nos. 25–30 (Demolished).
    • No. 31, 32 and 34
    • Nos. 35 and 36
    • Nos. 37 and 38
    • Eaton House: Nos. 39 and 40.
    • Nos. 41–43.
    • Nos. 44 and 45
    • No. 46
    • No. 47.
    • No. 48.

    The whole frontage betweenPark Lane and the site of No. 31 was originally developedin the late 1720's and early 30's under an agreement withthe mason Richard Lissiman (fn. 2) to whom the houses wereleased in 1729 (Nos. 25–28) and 1732 (Nos. 29 and 30). (fn. 3) At No. 25 Lissiman's son-in-law and former apprentice,William Hale, was co-lessee. (fn. 4...

    No. 31, 32 and 34 (demolished) were erected on thecurtilage of Lord Chetwynd's mansion (later GrosvenorHouse) at No. 33, which was set back from the street with acourtyard in front (fig. 55 on page 244). Nos. 31 and 32were built in c. 1732 at Chetwynd's expense, probably bythe carpenter Benjamin Timbrell, and No. 34 under a sublease of 1731 from Ch...

    Nos. 35 and 36 (demolished) were both originally builtin c. 1735 under leases to Thomas Skeat, bricklayer, andJohn Eds, carpenter, respectively. (fn. 21) Little is known abouttheir subsequent history but No. 35 was probably eitherrebuilt or reconstructed in the later eighteenth century. In1793 it was acquired by the Hon. George Villiers but beingqu...

    Nos. 37 and 38 were rebuilt in 1911–12 as part of arange having its principal elevation in Park Street which isdescribed on page 252. When the sites were originallydeveloped by the bricklayer James Jenner in the early1730's, he built three houses here, the corner house beingentered and numbered in Park Street. (fn. 23) The latter wasrebuilt in 1825...

    This bulky, butarchitecturally small-scaled block of flats, was built in1934–6 by Edifis Limited of Grosvenor Road, Pimlico(described in directories as wharfingers). (fn. 25) The jobarchitect was S. C. Macey, the front elevation, however,being designed by Wimperis, Simpson and Guthrie. (fn. 26) This they originally intended to be of brick with ston...

    These three houses have stone-facedelevations in a restrained classical style, designed to 'read'as a single composition and provided by Turner Lord andCompany in 1912–14. (fn. 37)But at each house the client wasdifferent, and only No. 41 was totally rebuilt. This house, the widest of the three, was originallyerected under a sub-lease of 1731 to th...

    Nos. 44 and 45 were both erected under leases ofNovember 1727 to William Draycott esquire of St.James's, Westminster, but were probably built by CharlesGriffith, carpenter, who was a party to the leases. No. 44was first occupied in 1731 and No. 45 in 1732. (fn. 59)They havevirtually identical three-bay brick fronts with segmentalheaded windows (len...

    No. 46 is a nine-storey block of flats erected in 1937–9by Marais Construction Limited to the designs of FernandBillerey (fn. 68) (Plate 31c). It has a red-brick and Portland-stone front of minimal neo-Georgian character, for whichthe elevation was personally approved by the secondDuke. (fn. 69)At the back of the main building, but linked to it,is ...

    The structural core of this thoroughlyEdwardianised house is a rebuilding of the 1820's. Itreplaced the original early-Georgian house erected under alease of 1728 to the bricklayer Robert Phillips, and firstoccupied in 1732. (fn. 74) Like the still-surviving and equallynarrow house built by Phillips at No. 48, it was plannedwith a central toplit st...

    This house, built in 1727–9 by the bricklayerRobert Phillips, (fn. 86)has the best-preserved early-Georgianfront in Upper Grosvenor Street (Plate 62a). The interior,on the other hand, though little altered in plan, containsvirtually no original features. The house was purchased by its future first occupant,Colonel William Hanmer, while still in the...

  3. 03/06/2022 · Based in Norfolk, Victoria, who is one of the Queen's 30 godchildren, reminisced about her memories with the Queen on today's Good Morning Britain on the second day of Jubilee celebrations.

  4. 16/06/2022 · free encyclopedia Jump navigation Jump search British politician.mw parser output .hatnote font style italic .mw parser output div.hatnote padding left 1.6em margin bottom 0.5em .mw parser output .hatnote font style normal .mw parser output .hatnote link...

  5. David Alexander Cospatrick Douglas-Home, 15th Earl of Home, KT, CVO, CBE ( / ˈhjuːm /; born 20 November 1943) is a British businessman and Conservative politician. Contents 1 Background and education 2 Political career 3 Family 4 Titles and styles 5 Honours 6 References 7 External links Background and education [ edit]