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  1. The British conquest of Egypt (1882), also known as Anglo-Egyptian War ( Arabic: الاحتلال البريطاني لمصر, romanized : al-iḥtilāl al-Brīṭānī li-Miṣr, lit. 'British occupation of Egypt'), occurred in 1882 between Egyptian and Sudanese forces under Ahmed ‘Urabi and the United Kingdom. It ended a nationalist uprising against the Khedive Tewfik Pasha.

  2. Invasión anglo-egipcia de Sudán Mapa de 1894 que muestra la extensión del estado mahdista en Sudán La conquista anglo-egipcia de Sudán en 1896-1899 fue una reconquista del territorio perdido por los "jedive" de la dinastía de Muhammad Ali en Egipto en 1884 y 1885 durante la "Guerra del Mahdismo".

    • Background
    • Treaty Signing
    • Treaty Provisions
    • Aftermath
    • External Links

    In November 1918, seven prominent Egyptians from the landed gentry and the legal profession, including Sa'd Zaghlul, formed a delegation, or wafd, whose chief goal was the complete independence of Egypt from British rule. But when the wafd asked the British High Commissionerin Egypt if they could represent the country at the 1919 Paris Peace Confer...

    The Treaty was signed in the Locarno Room at the Foreign Office building in London on 27 August 1936. The principal signatories were Egyptian premier Nahas Pasha and British Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden. Other signatories included Ramsay MacDonald, Mahmoud Pasha, Lord Halifax, Sir John Simon, Ismail Sidky Pasha, Makram Ebeid Pasha, Sir Miles Lamp...

    Removal of military forces from the Egyptian cities to the Suez Canal area but British soldiers in Sudan remain unconditionally.
    The number of British troops in Egypt to number no more than 10 thousand soldiers and 400 pilots with the staff required for administrative and technical work in peacetime only, while during a stat...
    British forces are not transferred to new areas until new barracks are built.
    British troops remain in Alexandriaeight years from the date of the Treaty

    On 23 September 1945, after the end of World War II, the Egyptian government demanded the modification of the treaty to terminate the British military presence, and also to allow the annexation of the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan. In 1946, Britain agreed to withdraw all remaining troops in Egypt into the Suez Canal Zone. In 1947, UK troops officially withd...

    "Full Text of the Treaty". Foreign and Commonwealth Office. Archived from the original (PDF) on 24 September 2012. Retrieved 23 February 2010.
  3. 24 de feb. de 2019 · Category:1882 Anglo-Egyptian War From Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository Subcategories This category has the following 18 subcategories, out of 18 total. A Alexandria fortifications ‎ (10 C, 19 F) Alexandria mob revolt (1882) ‎ (6 F) B Battle of Kassassin ‎ (5 F) Battle of Tel el-Kebir ‎ (1 C, 23 F)

    • Preliminaries
    • Kitchener's Forces
    • Sudan Military Railroad
    • Campaign of 1896
    • Campaign of 1897
    • Campaign of 1898
    • Battle of Omdurman
    • Final Campaigns
    • See Also
    • External Links

    There was a considerable body of opinion in Britain in favour of retaking Sudan after 1885, largely to "avenge Gordon". However, Lord Cromer, the British consul-general in Egypt, had been the architect of the British withdrawal after the Mahdist uprising. He remained sure that Egypt needed to recover its financial position before any invasion could...

    The Egyptian army mobilised and by 4 June 1896 Kitchener had assembled a force of 9,000 men, consisting of ten infantry battalions, fifteen cavalry and camel corps squadrons, and three artillery batteries. All the soldiers were Sudanese or Egyptian, with the exception of a few hundred men from the North Staffordshire Regiment and some Maxim gunners...

    Kitchener placed great importance on transport and communications. Reliance on river transport, and the vagaries of the Nile flooding, had reduced Garnet Wolseley's Nile Expeditionto failure in 1885, and Kitchener was determined not to let that happen again. This required the building of new railways to support his invasion forces. The first phase ...

    The Egyptian army moved swiftly to the border at Wadi Halfa and began moving south on 18 March to take Akasha, a village which was to be the base for the expedition. Akasha was deserted when they entered on 20 Marchand Kitchener devoted the next two months to building up his forces and supplies ready for the next advance. Apart from occasional skir...

    The fall of Dongola was a shock to the Khalifa and his followers in Omdurman, as it immediately placed their capital under threat. They thought it was likely that Kitchener would attack by striking across the desert from Korti to Metemma, as the Nile Expedition had done in 1885. The Khalifa therefore directed Osman Azraq to hold Abu Klea and Wad Bi...

    To be sure of having the necessary strength to defeat the Mahdist forces in their heartland, Kitchener brought up reinforcements from the British army, and a brigade under Major General William F. Gatacre arrived in Sudan at the end of January 1898. The Warwicks, Lincolns and Cameron Highlanders had to march the last thirty miles as the railway had...

    The defeat of the Khalifah's forces at Omdurman marked the effective end of the Mahdist state, though not the end of campaigning. Over 11,000 Mahdist fighters died at Omdurman, and another 16,000 were seriously wounded. On the British, Egyptian and Sudanese side there were fewer than fifty dead and several hundred wounded.The Khalifa retreated into...

    A force under Colonel Parsons was sent from Kassala to Al Qadarif which was retaken from Mahdist forces on 22 September. A flotilla of two boats under General Hunter was sent up the Blue Nile on 19 September to plant flags and establish garrisons wherever seemed expedient. They planted the Egyptian and British flags at Er Roseires on 30 September, ...

  4. Anglo-Egyptian War The British conquest of Egypt, also known as Anglo-Egyptian War, occurred in 1882 between Egyptian and Sudanese forces under Ahmed ‘Urabi and the United Kingdom. It ended a...

  5. The Battle of Tel El Kebir (often spelled Tel-El-Kebir) was fought on 13 September 1882 at Tell El Kebir in Egypt, 110 km north-north-east of Cairo. An entrenched Egyptian force under the command of Ahmed ʻUrabi was defeated by a British army led by Garnet Wolseley, in a sudden assault preceded by a march under cover of darkness.