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  1. 20/01/2022 · A childhood spent gambling and horse racing at Newmarket. Schooling at Westminster, a degree from Cambridge, a Grand Tour of Europe, and easing into early adulthood as a Member of Parliament for Bury St Edmunds. But John, 2nd Baron Hervey - the bisexual "Master-Miss" - was not a typical Lord.

  2. 15/01/2022 · Oil Painting Replica | Lord John Hervey (1696–1743), 2nd Baron Hervey of Ickworth, PC, MP, 1737 by John Fayram | ArtsDot.com

  3. 08/01/2022 · Reproductions D'art | lord john hervey ( 1696–1743 ) , 2nd baron hervey de Ickworth , SUR PC , MP, 1737 de John Fayram | ArtsDot.com

  4. 28/12/2021 · John Hervey, 1st Baron Hervey, later 1st Earl of Bristol and an ardent Whig, was also a devotee of the finest ‘New French Clarets’. Between 1702 and 1741 he spent over £2,406 on wine, most of it lux-ury claret, including Haut-Brion, Margaux, Lafite and Latour.

  5. 11/01/2022 · John Hervey, 2nd Baron Hervey: 10/13/1696: Birth: English statesman and writer : John Mortimer: 4/21/1923: Birth: English barrister and writer : Pedro ...

  6. 03/01/2022 · John Hervey, 2nd Baron Hervey: 8/5/1743: Death: English statesman and writer : Maria Georgina Grey: 9/19/1906: Death: British writer and founder of the ...

    • Nos. 4 and 5
    • Nos. 68
    • Nos. 913
    • No. 14
    • No. 15
    • No. 16
    • No. 17
    • No. 18
    • Nos. 19 and 20
    • Nos. 21 and 22

    Nos. 4 and 5 consist of a five-storey building at No. 5, anda lower, two-storey extension, having a canted front to thecorner with Avery Row, at No. 4. No. 5, with its trimmingsof a deep cornice and quoins, was originally a separatehouse which was built in 1863 to designs by SydneySmirke, but with an elevational treatment largely dictatedby the estate surveyor, Thomas Cundy II. Smirke took abuilding lease of the site, which had formerly beenoccupied by the Lion and Goat public house, 'that he maysecure an unobjectionable building' opposite to his ownhouse at No. 80. (fn. 1) An extra storey was added in 1905, (fn. 2) andin 1928 this house and its neighbour at No. 4 (which hadbeen rebuilt as two 'kiosks' in 1888 (fn. 3) ) were drasticallyaltered to their present appearance. The author of theconversion, which uses vestigial classical mouldings atfirst-floor level, was L. Youngman Harris of GordonJackson and Lambert. (fn. 4)Sir Edwin Lutyens acted for theEstate but it is unlikely that h...

    Nos. 68 (consec.) are the much-mutilated survivors ofa group of four houses (originally including No. 9) whichwere built by John Garlick to the designs of EdwardI'Anson III in 19001. (fn. 5)They are tall, narrow, red-brickhouses in a Queen Anne style that is rare in the oldresidential streets of the estate. Attractive ironworksurvives on the continuous first-floor balcony. At No. 7 the original house had by 1731 gilt leatherpanels in at least one room, a 'bath room' for Lord Pagetand a 'green house' in the garden. (fn. 6) Occupants include: No. 6, 2nd Earl of Radnor, 1804. (Sir)Ellis Ashmead Bartlett, (kt.), politician, 188896 (previously atNo. 57). Sir Bruce Bruce-Porter, K.B.E., 190534. No. 7, LadyHillsborough, wife of 1st Viscount Hillsborough, 1725, 17289.Lord Paget, son of 1st Earl of Uxbridge, 17307. Sir GeorgeVandeput, 2nd bt., candidate in Westminster by-election of1750, 174851. James Stuart, architect, 175963. Lady AnneCecil, da. of 6th Earl of Salisbury, 177180. William Bu...

    Nos. 913 (consec.) is a seven-storey block ofshowrooms, offices and flats built in 19624 to the designsof Hillier, Parker, May and Rowden (chief staff architect,Eric H. Davie), (fn. 7)the modular pattern of the main faadebeing formed by horizontal stone bands and slendervertical brick piers. At No. 10 tenders for a rebuilding were invited in 1867by the architect E. A. Gruning, doubtless with a Cundyfront specified in 1865. (fn. 8) Occupants include: No. 9, Gen. Diemer or Diemar, 'ambassador', 172741. Sir Roger Burgoyne, 6th bt., 17428. RobertAndrews, London agent for the Grosvenor family, 17505 (alsoat No. 10). (Sir) James Peachey, latterly 4th bt., later 1st BaronSelsey, 175571 (later at No. 33). Lieut.-gen. Sir RobertHamilton, 6th bt., 177786: his wid., 17861816. WilliamClaridge, hotelier, 18506. Sir Henry Stracey, 5th bt., 187680.No. 10, Col. George Churchill, 172530. Robert Andrews,London agent for the Grosvenor family, 173049, 175463 (alsoat No. 9). Col. (latterly gen.) Felix B...

    No. 14, which once formed a pair with No. 13, waserected in 18523 by the builder John Newson to anelevational design by Thomas Cundy II. (fn. 9)It is a brickfaced two-bay house of four main storeys with the typicalItalianate appendages favoured by the Estate at that period. Occupants include: 1st Earl of Leicester of Holkham,183942. Henry Sturt, later 1st Baron Alington, 185664. HenryGraves, later 5th Baron Graves, 188392. 4th Baron Abercromby, 18931909.

    No. 15 was the rectory of St. George's, Hanover Square,until 1937 when it acquired its present-appearance. Theoriginal rectory house on the site was sold by its buildinglessee, John Jenner, bricklayer, to the 'Fifty ChurchesCommissioners' in 1724 for 1,300, and in the same yearSir Richard Grosvenor conveyed the freehold to them for135 (thirty years' purchase of the ground rent of4 10s). (fn. 10) In 1826 the house is said to have been 'rebuilt' ata cost of 3,960, (fn. 11) and after ceasing to be the rector'sresidence it was virtually rebuilt again in 1937, when thefront elevation was altered to match that of No. 16 so thatthe two houses could be occupied jointly by a firm ofdressmakers. The architects for the conversion wereWimperis, Simpson and Guthrie. (fn. 12) Occupants include the following rectors: Andrew Trebeck,172559. Dr. Charles Moss, latterly Bishop of St. David's,176074. Dr. Henry Reginald Courtenay, latterly Bishopsuccessively of Bristol and Exeter, 17741803. Robert Hodgs...

    No. 16, one of the largest houses on the estate, was builtby the architect Thomas Ripley, who when he entered intoan agreement to develop the plot in 1720 was described as acarpenter, but who had risen to the rank of 'esquire' by thetime he was granted a building lease in 1724. (fn. 13) Hisadvance in the world was largely due to the patronage ofSir Robert Walpole, (fn. 14) whose eldest son was the firstoccupant here. In 1740 Ripley sold the house for 5,000 tothe second occupant, the second Baron Conway, later firstEarl and first Marquess of Hertford. (fn. 15) Despite later alterations, the decent but unadventurousstreet elevation that might have been expected from thearchitect of the Admiralty in Whitehall is still visible (Plate9a, fig. 15). The exceptional width (fifty-five feet) allowedfor five generous bays and probably accounts for the factthat the house has not been heightened from its originalthree main storeys and garrets. The ground storey hasbeen altered beyond recognition...

    No. 17, originally four windows wide, was rebuilt, threewindows wide and set back, by the builder John Newson in18556 for a private tenant. The architect was J. P. St.Aubyn (with G. R. Crickmay as his clerk of works) butThomas Cundy II, as usual at this period, provided theelevation. (fn. 36) Behind this front, subsequent alterationsinclude work by or for the architect and speculator, F. W.Foster, in 1914. A number of alterations have since beenmade to the interior and at the rear, (fn. 37)but, apart fromchanges at ground-floor level, the faade in GrosvenorStreet remains an excellent example of the kind of streetelevation favoured by the second Marquess of Westminster and his surveyor. Three windows wide and of fourmain storeys, it is faced with Suffolk bricks above astuccoed ground floor with a Doric porch and balcony ofPortland stone and has cement dressings to the windows,those on the first floor with hoods carried on consoles, anda deep, crisply modelled cornice with a Vitruvian...

    No. 18 is structurally a four-bay early-Georgian houseerected under a building lease granted to ThomasRichmond, carpenter, in 1723, (fn. 39) but refronted in stone atthe beginning of this century (Plates 9a, 13a, 14b).Decimus Burton made additions of unknown extent in18356, (fn. 14) and in 1851 the faade was heightened and'improved' to the usual Estate specifications (John Kelk,builder). (fn. 40) In 19012 John Garlick, the builder, made, as aspeculation, a number of alterations including the erectionof a new stone front with a canted bay. An advertisementcommended the 'moderate number of bedrooms'twelve. (fn. 41) The architects may have been Ayling andLittlewood, who did other work for Garlick at about thistime. In 1937 Sidney Parvin was granted permission toreplace the bay at ground-floor level with a shop front andmake other alterations to the ground storey. (fn. 42) Internally the pressures of commercial occupation andsubdivision have resulted in many changes, but a numberof Adam...

    Nos. 19 and 20 received their present appearance in19356 when No. 19 was rebuilt with three neo-Georgianred-brick storeys and an attic above a ground-floor shop,and No. 20 was refaced to match. The architects were C. S.and E. M. Joseph. (fn. 43) No. 20 had been rebuilt in 18523 for the builder andspeculator, Wright Ingle. His architect was HenryHarrison but the faade had to adhere to the Estate's usualItalianate formula (fn. 44) (Plate 9b). Ingle contracted thebuilding work out to R. Watts of Motcomb Street. (fn. 45) In192930 Frederick Etchells designed a Georgian-styleshop window and doorcase, but these too were removed in19356. (fn. 46) Occupants include: No. 19, Col. John Laforey, Huguenot,17448, 17513. Gen. William Hargrove, 1750. Sir FrankStandish, 3rd bt., 17801812. Viscount Normanby, latterly 2ndEarl of Mulgrave, 182234. James Stuart-Wortley, lawyer andpolitician, 18436. Lord Kenlis, later styled Earl of Bective,1868 (later at No. 34). Viscount Maidstone, later 14th Earl ofWi...

    Nos. 21 and 22 were erected as private houses in 18989to the designs of Eustace Balfour, the estate surveyor, andThackeray Turner, his partner. Above the ground floor theonly serious alteration since has been the enlargement ofthe attic windows, and the buildings are excellent examplesof the forceful and original domestic style of thispartnership. Even the chimney-stacks with their decorative brick and stone arcading have survived. Originallyit was intended that the faades should be entirely of stone,but the first Duke of Westminster, displaying his usualpredilections, wanted them to be of red brick. (fn. 47) The resultwas a felicitous compromise in which irregular bands ofbrick and stone alternate in a display of polychromy ofalmost Butterfieldian intensity, relieved by a boldlyprojecting cornice of unusual design above the fourthstorey and a subsidiary one above the ground floor whichforms the base for a Philip Webb-derived arcade in shallowrelief. Originally the houses had a rema...

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