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  1. Jorge III foi o Rei da Grã-Bretanha e da Irlanda de 25 de outubro de 1760 até a união dos dois países em 1 de janeiro de 1801, tornando-se o primeiro Rei do Reino Unido da Grã-Bretanha e Irlanda até sua morte. Também foi duque e príncipe-eleitor do Eleitorado de Brunsvique-Luneburgo no Sacro Império Romano-Germânico até sua promoção a Rei de Hanôver em 12 de outubro de 1814. Jorge foi o terceiro monarca britânico da Casa de Hanôver. Sua vida e reinado foram ...

  2. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › George_IIIGeorge III - Wikipedia

    • Early Life
    • Marriage
    • Early Reign
    • American War of Independence
    • Constitutional Struggle and William Pitt
    • French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars
    • Final Years, Illnesses and Death
    • Legacy
    • Titles, Styles, Honours and Arms
    • See Also

    George was born on 4 June 1738 in London at Norfolk House in St James's Square. He was a grandson of King George II, and the eldest son of Frederick, Prince of Wales, and Augusta of Saxe-Gotha. As he was born two months prematurely and thought unlikely to survive, he was baptised the same day by Thomas Secker, who was both Rector of St James's and Bishop of Oxford.One month later, he was publicly baptised at Norfolk House, again by Secker. His godparents were King Frederick I of Sweden (for whom Lord Baltimore stood proxy), his uncle Frederick III, Duke of Saxe-Gotha (for whom Lord Carnarvon stood proxy), and his great-aunt Sophia Dorothea, Queen in Prussia (for whom Lady Charlotte Edwinstood proxy). George grew into a healthy, reserved and shy child. The family moved to Leicester Square, where George and his younger brother Prince Edward, Duke of York and Albany, were educated together by private tutors. Family letters show that he could read and write in both English and German, a...

    In 1759, George was smitten with Lady Sarah Lennox, sister of Charles Lennox, 3rd Duke of Richmond, but Lord Bute advised against the match and George abandoned his thoughts of marriage. "I am born for the happiness or misery of a great nation," he wrote, "and consequently must often act contrary to my passions." Nevertheless, attempts by the King to marry George to Princess Sophie Caroline of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel were resisted by him and his mother; Sophie married Frederick, Margrave of Bayreuth, instead. The following year, at the age of 22, George succeeded to the throne when his grandfather, George II, died suddenly on 25 October 1760, two weeks before his 77th birthday. The search for a suitable wife intensified. On 8 September 1761 in the Chapel Royal, St James's Palace, the King married Princess Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, whom he met on their wedding day.[d] A fortnight later on 22 September, both were crowned at Westminster Abbey. George remarkably never took a mis...

    George, in his accession speech to Parliament, proclaimed: "Born and educated in this country, I glory in the name of Britain." He inserted this phrase into the speech, written by Lord Hardwicke, to demonstrate his desire to distance himself from his German forebears, who were perceived as caring more for Hanover than for Britain. Although his accession was at first welcomed by politicians of all parties,[e] the first years of his reign were marked by political instability, largely generated as a result of disagreements over the Seven Years' War. George was also perceived as favouring Tory ministers, which led to his denunciation by the Whigs as an autocrat. On his accession, the Crown lands produced relatively little income; most revenue was generated through taxes and excise duties. George surrendered the Crown Estate to Parliamentary control in return for a civil listannuity for the support of his household and the expenses of civil government. Claims that he used the income to r...

    The American War of Independence was the culmination of the civil and political American Revolution resulting from the American Enlightenment. Thirteen British-American colonies ruled by Britain proved difficult to govern. Brought to a head over the lack of American representation in Parliament, which was seen as a denial of their rights as Englishmen and often popularly focused on direct taxes levied by Parliament on the colonies without their consent, the colonists resisted the imposition of direct rule after the Boston Tea Party. Creating self-governing provinces, they circumvented the British ruling apparatus in each colony by 1774. Armed conflict between British regulars and colonial militiamen broke out at the Battles of Lexington and Concord in April 1775. After petitions to the Crown for intervention with Parliament were ignored, the rebel leaders were declared traitors by the Crown and a year of fighting ensued. Thomas Paine's published work Common Senseabrasively referred...

    With the collapse of Lord North's ministry in 1782, the Whig Lord Rockingham became Prime Minister for the second time but died within months. The King then appointed Lord Shelburne to replace him. Charles James Fox, however, refused to serve under Shelburne, and demanded the appointment of William Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland. In 1783, the House of Commons forced Shelburne from office and his government was replaced by the Fox–North Coalition. Portland became Prime Minister, with Fox and Lord North, as Foreign Secretary and Home Secretary respectively. The King disliked Fox intensely, for his politics as well as his character; he thought Fox was unprincipled and a bad influence on the Prince of Wales. George III was distressed at having to appoint ministers not of his liking, but the Portland ministry quickly built up a majority in the House of Commons, and could not be displaced easily. He was further dismayed when the government introduced the India Bill, which propos...

    After George's recovery, his popularity, and that of Pitt, continued to increase at the expense of Fox and the Prince of Wales. His humane and understanding treatment of two insane assailants, Margaret Nicholson in 1786 and John Frith in 1790, contributed to his popularity. James Hadfield's failed attempt to shoot the King in the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, on 15 May 1800 was not political in origin but motivated by the apocalyptic delusions of Hadfield and Bannister Truelock. George seemed unperturbed by the incident, so much so that he fell asleep in the interval. The French Revolution of 1789, in which the French monarchy had been overthrown, worried many British landowners. France declared war on Great Britain in 1793; in the war attempt, George allowed Pitt to increase taxes, raise armies, and suspend the right of habeas corpus. The First Coalition to oppose revolutionary France, which included Austria, Prussia, and Spain, broke up in 1795 when Prussia and Spain made separate pe...

    In late 1810, at the height of his popularity, already virtually blind with cataracts and in pain from rheumatism, George III's mental disorder returned, and he became dangerously ill. In his view, the malady had been triggered by stress over the death of his youngest and favourite daughter, Princess Amelia. The Princess's nurse reported that "the scenes of distress and crying every day ... were melancholy beyond description." He accepted the need for the Regency Act 1811, and the Prince of Wales (later George IV), acted as Regent for the remainder of George III's life. Despite signs of a recovery in May 1811, by the end of the year George had become permanently insane and lived in seclusion at Windsor Castle until his death. Prime Minister Spencer Perceval was assassinated in 1812 and was replaced by Lord Liverpool. Liverpool oversaw British victory in the Napoleonic Wars. The subsequent Congress of Vienna led to significant territorial gains for Hanover, which was upgraded from an...

    George was succeeded by two of his sons, George IV and William IV, who both died without surviving legitimate children, leaving the throne to Victoria, the only legitimate child of Prince Edward. George III lived for 81 years and 239 days and reigned for 59 years and 96 days: both his life and his reign were longer than those of any of his predecessors and subsequent kings. Only Queens Victoria and Elizabeth II lived and reigned longer. George III was dubbed "Farmer George" by satirists, at first to mock his interest in mundane matters rather than politics, but later to portray him as a man of the people, contrasting his homely thrift with his son's grandiosity. Under George III, the British Agricultural Revolution reached its peak and great advances were made in fields such as science and industry. There was unprecedented growth in the rural population, which in turn provided much of the workforce for the concurrent Industrial Revolution. George's collection of mathematical and sci...

    Titles and styles

    1. 4 June 1738 – 31 March 1751: His Royal HighnessPrince George 2. 31 March 1751 – 20 April 1751: His Royal HighnessThe Duke of Edinburgh 3. 20 April 1751 – 25 October 1760: His Royal HighnessThe Prince of Wales 4. 25 October 1760 – 29 January 1820: His MajestyThe King In Great Britain, George III used the official style "George the Third, by the Grace of God, King of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, and so forth". In 1801, when Great Britain united with Ireland, he...

    Honours

    1. Great Britain: Royal Knight of the Garter, 22 June 1749 2. Ireland: Founder of the Most Illustrious Order of St. Patrick, 5 February 1783

    Arms

    Before his succession, George was granted the royal arms differenced by a label of five points Azure, the centre point bearing a fleur-de-lis Or on 27 July 1749. Upon his father's death, and along with the dukedom of Edinburgh and the position of heir-apparent, he inherited his difference of a plain label of three points Argent. In an additional difference, the crown of Charlemagne was not usually depicted on the arms of the heir, only on the Sovereign's. From his succession until 1800, Georg...

  3. 14/02/2020 · Español : Jorge III, Rey de Gran Bretaña (1760-1800), Rey del Reino Unido (1801-1820), príncipe elector de Brunswick-Luneburgo (1760-1806), Rey de Hannover (1814-1820)

  4. Jorge III do Reino Unido; Uso en ro.wikipedia.org George al III-lea al Regatului Unit; Uso en ru.wikipedia.org Георг III; Uso en sco.wikipedia.org George III; Uso en si.wikipedia.org තුන්වන ජෝර්ජ් (එක්සත් රාජධානිය) එක්සත් රාජධානියෙහි තුන්වන ජෝර්ජ් රජ; Uso en sk.wikipedia.org Juraj III.

  5. Jorge III del Reino Unido (Londres, 4 de junio de 1738 - Windsor, 29 de enero de 1820) fue rey de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda desde el 25 de octubre de 1760 hasta el 1 de enero de 1801, y a partir de entonces rey del Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda, unidos, hasta su muerte.

  6. Escudo de Jorge III del Reino Unido [ editar datos en Wikidata ] Jorge III del Reino Unido ( Londres , 4 de junio de 1738 - Windsor , 29 de enero de 1820 ) fue rey de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda desde el 25 de octubre de 1760 hasta el 1 de enero de 1801 , y a partir de entonces rey del Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda , unidos, hasta su muerte.

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