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  1. James, Duke of Rothesay (22 May 1540 – 21 April 1541) was the first of the two sons and three children born to King James V of Scotland and his second wife, Mary of Guise. From the moment of his birth James was Duke of Rothesay and heir apparent to the Scottish throne. Life. James, Duke of Rothesay was born in St Andrews on 22 May 1540.

    • 21 April 1541 (aged 10 months 30 days), St Andrews, Fife
    • James V of Scotland
  2. James, Duke of Rothesay may refer to: James Stewart, Duke of Rothesay (21 February 1507 – 27 February 1508), the eldest son of James IV and his queen consort Margaret Tudor . James Stewart, Duke of Rothesay (22 May 1540 – 21 April 1541), the eldest son of James V and Mary of Guise , and nephew of his aforementioned namesake.

  3. James Stewart, Duke of Rothesay (22 May 1540 – 12 April 1541) was the eldest son of James V and Mary of Guise, and nephew of his aforementioned namesake. At the time of his birth in St Andrews, James V had survived his own brothers.

    • May 22, 1540
    • Private User
    • St Andrews, Fife, Scotland (United Kingdom)
  4. James Stewart, Duke of Rothesay: Birthdate: February 21, 1507: Birthplace: Holyrood Palace, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland: Death: February 27, 1508 (1) Stirling Castle, Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland Immediate Family:

    • February 21, 1507
    • Anne Brannen
  5. 06/11/2017 · James Stewart, 10th duke of Rothesay: Also Known As: "Duke of Rothesay" Birthdate: May 22, 1540: Birthplace: St Andrew's,Edinburgh,Mid-Lothian,Scotland: Death: May 25, 1541 (1) Sterling, Stirlingshire, Scotland (United Kingdom) Place of Burial: Holyrood Abbey,Edinburgh,Mid-Lothian,Scotland: Immediate Family:

    • "Duke of Rothesay"
    • St Andrew's,Edinburgh,Mid-Lothian,Scotland
    • May 22, 1540
    • Early Life
    • Reign
    • Policy in The Highlands and Isles
    • War and Death
    • Fictional Portrayals
    • References
    • Bibliography

    Born on 17 March 1473 at Stirling Castle, James was the eldest son of King James III and Margaret of Denmark. As heir apparent to the Scottish crown, he became Duke of Rothesay at birth. James probably spent most of his infancy and youth at Stirling Castle in the care of his mother, along with his two younger brothers, James and John. In 1478 Queen Margaret was officially entrusted with the custody and education of the Duke of Rothesay, though this was probably no more than the confirmation of an already existing situation following James III's general revocation of 1476. Not much is known about James's early life, but it is known that he received a good education under the direction of his mother, became fluent in Latin and Spanish, and also learned French, German, Flemish and Italian. James was the last Scottish monarch known to have spoken Gaelic. The surviving exchequer records show that Prince James was taken from Striling to visit Edinburghin the summers of 1474 and 1479, and...

    Politics

    James IV's coronation took place 24 June 1488 at Scone Abbey. The Archbishop of St Andrews, William Scheves, would normally have been expected to officiate during the coronation ceremony, but as he was a favourite of James III, the new king was instead crowned by Robert Blackadder, Bishop of Glasgow. James IV quickly proved an effective ruler and a wise king. He defeated another rebellion in 1489, took a direct interest in the administration of justice and finally brought the Lord of the Isle...

    Culture

    James IV was a true Renaissance prince with an interest in practical and scientific matters. He granted the Incorporation of Surgeons and Barbers of Edinburgh a royal charter in 1506, turned Edinburgh Castle into one of Scotland's foremost gun foundries, and welcomed the establishment of Scotland's first printing press, Chepman and Myllar Press, in 1507. He built Holyrood Palace and a part of Falkland Palace, the great halls at Edinburgh and Stirling castles, and furnished his palaces with ta...

    Military

    James IV took a close personal interest in the development of the Royal Scots Navy, viewing the possession of a fleet as a means of protecting Scottish shipping and conferring international prestige on himself and his dynasty. In the course of his reign James commissioned or acquired a total of at least 38 ships. His naval building programme was large by any standards, quite remarkably so for the ruler of a small kingdom. The expenditure on ships, their supplying and maintenance, was by far t...

    In May 1493, John MacDonald, Lord of the Isles, was forfeited by the Parliament of Scotland. King James himself sailed to Dunstaffnage Castle, where the western chiefs made their submissions to him. John surrendered and was brought back as a pensioner to the royal court, then lived at Paisley Abbey. The Highlands and Islands now fell under direct royal control. John's grandson Domhnall Dubh (Donald Owre), one of the possible claimants to the Lordship, was peaceable, but the other, his nephew Alexander MacDonald of Lochalsh invaded Ross and was later killed on the island of Oronsayin 1497. In October 1496, the Royal Council ordered that the clan chiefs in the region would be held responsible by the king for crimes of the islanders. This act for the governance of the region was unworkable, and after the Act of Revocation of 1498 undermined the chiefs' titles to their lands, resistance to Edinburgh rule was strengthened. James waited at Kilkerran Castle at Campbeltown Loch to regrant t...

    When war broke out between England and France in 1512 as a result of the Italian Wars, James found himself in a difficult position as an ally by treaty to both France and England. Since the accession of Henry VIIIin 1509, relations with England had worsened, and when Henry invaded France, James reacted by declaring war on England. James had already baulked at the interdict of his kingdom by Pope Julius II[further explanation needed], and he opposed its confirmation by Pope Leo X, so that he was not in a good position with the pontiff. Leo sent a letter to James, threatening him with ecclesiastical censure for breaking peace treaties, on 28 June 1513, and James was subsequently excommunicated by Cardinal Christopher Bainbridge. James summoned sailors and sent the Scottish navy, including the Great Michael, to join the ships of Louis XII of France, so joining in the War of the League of Cambrai. Hoping to take advantage of Henry's absence at the siege of Thérouanne, he led an invading...

    James IV has been depicted in historical novels, short stories, and media portrayals. They include the following: 1. The Yellow Frigate (1855) by James Grant, also known as The Three Sisters. The main events of the novel take place in the year 1488, covering the Battle of Sauchieburn, the assassination of James III of Scotland, the rise to the throne of James IV, and the plots of the so-called English faction in Scotland. James IV, and Margaret Drummond are prominently depicted. Andrew Wood of Largo and Henry VII of Englandare secondary characters. 2. In the King's Favour (1899) by J. E. Preston Muddock, which covers the last few months of James IV's reign and ends with the Battle of Flodden(1513). 3. The Arrow of the North (1906) by R. H. Forster. The novel mainly depicts Northumberland in the reigns of Henry VII and Henry VIII. It covers the Flodden campaign of the Anglo-Scottish Warsand the finale depicts the battle that ended James IV's life. 4. The Crimson Field(1916) by Halliw...

    James the Fourth, Norman Macdougall(2006 with two earlier editions, regarded as definitive).
    King James IV of Scotland, R.L. Mackie (1958, the most important previous biography).
    Ashley, Mike (2002). British Kings & Queens. Carroll & Graf. pp. 280–286. ISBN 978-0-7867-1104-8.
    James IV in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, New York, 2004, Vol. 29, pp. 609–619
    Gosman, Martin; MacDonald, Alasdair A.; Vanderjagt, Arjo J. (2003). Princes and Princely Culture 1450-1650, Volume 1. BRILL. ISBN 9789004253520.
    Setton, Kenneth Meyer (1976). The Papacy and the Levant, 1204-1571. American Philosophical Society. ISBN 9780871691613.
  6. About James, Duke of Rothesay (born 1540) James Stewart, Duke of Rothesay (22 May 1540 – 21 April 1541) was a short-lived heir to the throne of the Kingdom of Scotland. He was the eldest son of James V and Mary of Guise, and nephew of his namesake James, Duke of Rothesay.

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