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  1. English began to have increased influence in Scotland from the mid-16th century. The Kingdom of Scotland ( Scottish Gaelic: Rìoghachd na h-Alba; Scots: Kinrick o Scotland Norn: Kongungdum Skotland) was a sovereign state in northwest Europe traditionally said to have been founded in 843.

  2. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › ScotlandScotland - Wikipedia

    Scotland (Scots: Scotland, Scottish Gaelic: Alba [ˈal̪ˠapə] ()) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.Covering the northern third of the island of Great Britain, mainland Scotland has a 96-mile (154-kilometre) border with England to the southeast and is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, the North Sea to the northeast and the Irish Sea to the south.

  3. The Kingdom of Scotland was a historic country and state. It started in the Early Middle Ages and was in existence until the early modern period . After 1603, it had the same monarch as the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of Ireland.

  4. The Kingdom of Scotland was united under the House of Alpin, whose members fought among each other during frequent disputed successions. The last Alpin king, Malcolm II , died without a male issue in the early 11th century and the kingdom passed through his daughter's son to the House of Dunkeld or Canmore.

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    The mainland of Scotland makes up ⅓ of the size of the Great Britain, and is to the northwest of mainland Europe. The size of the land of Scotland is 78,772km² (30,414 sq mi). Scotland's only land border is with England, and runs for 96 kilometres (60 mi) across. The Atlantic Ocean borders the west coast and the North Sea is to the east. The island...

    The history of Scotland begins when humans first began to live in Scotland after the end of the last ice age. Of the Stone Age, Bronze Age, and Iron Age civilization that existed in the country, many fossils remain, but no written records were left behind. These people did not have writing. St Kilda, Heart of Neolithic Orkney and Skara Brae are all...

    The official languages of Scotland are English, Scots and Scottish Gaelic. English is spoken by most people in Scotland, while only a small number, mostly in the Western Isles, speaks Scottish Gaelic. Scottish Gaelic began declining in the late Middle Ages when Scottish kings and nobles preferred English.

    Football

    Football is the most popular sport in Scotland. Three of the big cities, Glasgow, Edinburgh and Dundee, have two or three big football teams, and most cities have at least one team. The two most famous teams in Scotland are known as the "Old Firm". These are Celtic and Rangers. These two Glasgow clubs have a lot of history, and are fierce rivals, often causing fights, riots and even murders between the fans. Rangers are world record holders, having won the most amount of league titles of any...

    Rugby

    In 1925, 1984 and 1990, Scotland were winners of the Five Nations' Gran Slam, having beaten all four other teams - England, Wales, Ireland and France.

    Golf

    Golf is a popular sport in Scotland. It is unique, as Scotland is the birthplace of golf, and there are many public golf courses where people can play for small fees. Everywhere else in the world, golf is a game for the rich. Sandy Lyle was the first Scottish golfer to win a major title in modern times. Colin Montgomeryis one of the best players never to have won a major championship after finishing second five times.

    Traditional Scottish musical instruments include: the bagpipe, accordion, the fiddle, the harp and tin whistle.

  5. Strathclyde, was a Brittonic successor state of the Roman Empire and one of the early medieval kingdoms of the Britons, located in the region the Welsh tribes referred to as Yr Hen Ogledd, which comprised the Brythonic-speaking parts of what is now southern Scotland and northern England. The kingdom developed during Britain's post-Roman period. It is also known as Alt Clut, a Brittonic term for Dumbarton Castle, the medieval capital of the region. It may have had its origins with ...

  6. The Kingdom of the Isles consisted of the Isle of Man, the Hebrides and the islands of the Firth of Clyde from the 9th to the 13th centuries AD. The islands were known to the Norse as the Suðreyjar, or "Southern Isles" as distinct from the Norðreyjar or Northern Isles of Orkney and Shetland. In Scottish Gaelic, the kingdom is known as Rìoghachd nan Eilean. The historical record is incomplete, and the kingdom was not a continuous entity throughout the entire period. The islands ...