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  1. Nicholas Constantine Metropolis was a Greek-American physicist. Metropolis received his BSc and PhD in physics at the University of Chicago. Shortly afterwards, Robert Oppenheimer recruited him from Chicago, where he was collaborating with Enrico Fermi and Edward Teller on the first nuclear reactors, to the Los Alamos National Laboratory. He arrived in Los Alamos in April 1943, as a member of the original staff of fifty scientists. He came back to Los Alamos in 1948 to lead the ...

  2. Nicholas Constantine Metropolis (11 de junio de 1915 – 7 de octubre de 1999) fue un matemático, físico y computador científico greco-estadounidense. Metropolis recibió su B.Sc. en 1937 y su Ph.D. en 1941 en física experimental en la Universidad de Chicago .

  3. Nicholas Metropolis. Nicholas Constantine Metropolis was born on June 11th, 1915, in Chicago. In 1936 he received his bachelor's degree, and in 1941, his doctorate, both from the University of Chicago, and both in experimental physics. While at Chicago, Metropolis worked at the Met Lab as an assistant to Enrico Fermi.

  4. Nicholas Constantine Metropolis (11 de junio de 1915 – 7 de octubre de 1999) fue un matemático, físico y computador científico greco-estadounidense. Metropolis recibió su B.Sc. en 1937 y su Ph.D. en 1941 en física experimental en la Universidad de Chicago .

  5. Nicholas Constantine Metropolis was an American mathematician, physicist, scientist and author. He was best known among scientists for his modifications to the Monte Carlo method, which applies the mathematical laws of probability to science. Background Nicholas Constantine Metropolis was born on June 11, 1915, in Chicago, Illinois, United States.

  6. Nicholas Constantine Metropolis, né le 11 juin 1915 à Chicago et mort le 17 octobre 1999 à Los Alamos (Nouveau-Mexique) [1], est un physicien gréco-américain.

  7. 30/12/2019 · Name: Nicholas Constantine Metropolis. Born: June 11, 1915, in Chicago, Illinois, USA. Death: October 17, 1999 (Age: 84) Computer-related contributions. Greek American physicist. Known for the Monte Carlo method, simulated annealing and Metropolis–Hastings algorithm.