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  1. Nicolas Charles Oudinot. Nicolas Charles Oudinot ( Bar-le-duc, 25 de abril de 1767 - París, 13 de septiembre de 1847 ), Duque de Reggio y Mariscal de Francia, fue un militar francés . Procedente de una familia burguesa de Lorena, nació en la localidad de Bar-le-duc. Muy pronto se decidió por la carrera militar, sirviendo en el regimiento de ...

  2. Nicolas Charles Oudinot, 1st Count Oudinot, 1st Duke of Reggio (25 April 1767 in Bar-le-Duc – 13 September 1847 in Paris), was a Marshal of the Empire.He is known to have been wounded 34 times in battle, being hit by artillery shells, sabers, and at least twelve bullets over the course of his military career.

  3. Nicolas-Charles Oudinot was born in Bar-le-Duc on 25 April, 1767, into a family from the petite-bourgeoisie. At the age of seventeen, after completing his studies in his hometown as well as in Toul and unwilling to follow in his father's professional footsteps, he signed up for the Médoc Infantry regiment, in 1784.

  4. Nicolas Charles Oudinot. Nicolás Carlos Oudinot, Duque de Reggio Calabria (25 de abril de 1767 - 13 de septiembre de 1847) fue un general francés, Mariscal del Imperio bajo Napoleón Bonaparte. Soldado de origen burgués, Oudinot obtuvo los rangos de oficial gracias a la Revolución francesa y pronto salió a la luz durante los ...

    • Beginnings
    • Commander of Elite Grenadiers
    • Russian Campaign of 1812
    • 1813 - 1815

    One of the most wounded soldiers of the time, Nicolas-Charles Oudinot was the son of a brewer who would rise to become one of Napoleon'smarshals. In 1784 at age seventeen he ran away from home and enlisted in the infantry, but three years later his father bought out his enlistment and he returned home. That was not enough to keep him out of the military though. When the Revolution started in 1789, Oudinot volunteered to join a company of volunteers and the following year he joined the National Guard of Meuse. In 1791 Oudinot became a lieutenant colonel of the 3rd Battalion of Volunteers of the Meuse and then he went on to serve in the Army of the Rhine and the Army of the Moselle. In November of 1793 Oudinot was promoted to chef de brigade and took part in the defense of Bitche before being wounded by a shot to the head at Haguenau in December. Back in action before long, in May of 1794 he cleared a passage at Kaiserslautern with the bayonet and then fought at Morlautern. That June...

    In 1805 Oudinot was given command of an elite division of grenadiers and he received the Grand Eagle of the Legion of Honor. During a review at the Camp of Boulogne that year, Oudinot and his men proudly paraded past Emperor Napoleon. Suddenly, Oudinot's horse stopped, and refused to go forward. In vain he tried to spur it forward, but the horse refused to budge, and even went so far as to attempt to buck him off. Thoroughly annoyed, Oudinot dismounted, drew his sword, and slid it through the horse's neck, killing it almost instantly. Napoleon later asked him, "Is that way you treat all your horses?" "Sire, that is my way when I am not obeyed," Oudinot replied.1 As war broke out that year, Oudinot's elite division became part of Marshal Lannes' V Corps. That November, as the French were pursuing the Russians, Oudinot and his men encountered some of the Russian rearguard. As he and a squadron of cavalry were scouting the area, suddenly they were surprised by Russian infantry hiding i...

    In the meantime Marshal Oudinot received more rewards, including the Grand Cross of the Order of the Low Countries and becoming the Duke of Reggio. In 1812 Oudinot took command of the II Corps to lead them into Russia. That summer he won at Deweltowo, seized Dunabourg, was repulsed at Jboukowo, and won at Oboiarszina. Fighting at Polotsk in August, he was badly wounded by grapeshot to the shoulder and had to hand over his command to General Gouvion St. Cyr, who won the battle the following day and a marshal's baton. By October Oudinot had recovered enough to resume command of II Corps, and in November he and his men won at Lochnitza. As one of the more intact corps of the army, II Corps was given an important part during the Battle of the Berezina. As Oudinot and his corps fought off the Russians on the far side of the Berezina, he was struck by a bullet and immediately fell to the ground. Feared for dead, his men were happily surprised to realize he was still alive, and they improv...

    Marshal Oudinot returned to a command in April of 1813 when he took command of XII Corps in Germany. In May he fought at Bautzen and Hoyerswerda, and then in June at Luckau. That August he was ordered to march on Berlin and was beaten by his former colleague Bernadotte at Gross-Beeren. That September Napoleon gave him command of two divisions of the Young Guard which he led into battle at Leipzig and Freyburg. During the defense of France of 1814, Oudinot was again wounded, this time at Brienne. That February he took command of VII Corps and fought at La Rothière, Mormant, Méry-sur-Seine, and Bar-sur-Aube. The next month he fought at Veneuvre and then at Arcis-sur-Aubehe was hit in the chest by a ball, his life being saved by the Grand Eagle of the Legion of Honor that absorbed the hit. Oudinot was one of the marshals who called for Napoleon's abdication, and afterwards the returning Bourbons made him a Commander of Saint Louis and Peer of France. When Napoleon escaped from exile, O...

  5. 24/05/2018 · Nicolas Charles Oudinot, 1st Comte Oudinot, 1st Duc de Reggio (25 April 1767 in Bar-le-Duc – 13 September 1848 in Paris), was a Marshal of France. Nicolas Charles Oudinot was the son of Nicolas Oudinot and Marie Anne Adam, the only one of their nine children to live to adulthood. His father was brewer, farmer and distiller of brandy in Bar-le ...

    • April 25, 1767
    • David Andrew Dyer
    • Bar-le-Duc, Lorraine, France
  6. Nicolas Charles Oudinot, Duc de Reggio, Marshal (1809) (Born Bar-Le-Duc, 1767 - Died 1847) "The Bayard of the French army" (Napoleon). Napoleon waited some time before giving a marshal's baton to this general, although he held him in high esteem. Oudinot's military career was faultless and he was a born gentleman, happy on the battlefield ...