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  1. Friedrich Franz Xaver Prince of Hohenzollern-Hechingen was an Austrian general. He joined the Austrian military and fought against the Kingdom of Prussia, Ottoman Turkey, and the First French Republic. He was promoted to the rank of general officer during the French Revolutionary Wars. During the Napoleonic Wars, he led a division in 1805 and an army corps in 1809. He was Proprietor of an Austrian cavalry regiment from 1802 to 1844.

  2. Leopold III Frederick Franz, Duke of Anhalt-Dessau, known as "Prince Franz" or "Father Franz", was a German prince of the House of Ascania. From 1751 until 1807 he was reigning prince of the Principality of Anhalt-Dessau and from 1807 the first Duke of the Duchy of Anhalt-Dessau. A strong supporter of the Enlightenment, Leopold undertook numerous reforms in his principality and made Anhalt-Dessau one of the most modern and prosperous of the small German states. An Anglophile ...

    • Early Life and Childhood
    • Marriage and Children
    • Military Services
    • Death and Reaction

    Wilhelm was born on 4 July 1906 at the Hohenzollern family's private summer residence, Marmorpalais, or Marble Palace, near Potsdam, where his parents were residing until their own home, Schloss Cecilienhof, could be completed. His father was Crown Prince Wilhelm, the eldest son and heir to the German Emperor, Wilhelm II. His mother was Duchess Cec...

    While a student at Bonn, Wilhelm fell in love with a fellow student, Dorothea von Salviati (10 September 1907 – 7 May 1972). Her parents were Alexander Hermann Heinrich August von Salviati and Helene "Ella" Crasemann (of the well-established Hamburg merchant family, Crasemann). Her maternal grandfather was the Hamburg parliamentarian Gustav August ...

    During the Weimar Republic, Wilhelm inadvertently caused a public scandal by attending Army manoeuvres in the uniform of the old Imperial First Foot Guards without first seeking government approval. The commander of the Reichswehr, Hans von Seeckt, was forced to resign as a result. The Oster conspiracyof 1938 sought to restore Wilhelm to the throne...

    In May 1940, Wilhelm took part in the invasion of France. He was wounded during the fighting in Valenciennes and died in a field hospital in Nivelles on 26 May 1940. His funeral service was held at the Church of Peace, and he was buried in the Hohenzollern family mausoleum in the Antique Temple in Sanssouci Park. The service drew over 50,000 mourne...

    • Early Career
    • French Revolutionary Wars
    • Napoleonic Wars
    • Later Career
    • References
    • External Links

    Born into a princely family near Maastricht on 31 May 1757 in the modern-day Netherlands, Hohenzollern first joined the Dutch army in 1775. A year later, he entered the Habsburg service in his uncle's regiment, the Friedrich Anton of Hohenzollern-Hechingen Cuirassiers # 4. He later fought in the War of the Bavarian Succession. In 1783 he married Ma...

    War of the First Coalition

    In 1793 Hohenzollern received promotion to Oberst (colonel) and fought at the battles of Neerwinden and Wattignies. The following year he was involved in the sieges of Landrecies and Charleroi. In 1795 he fought in the Army of the Upper Rhine. In 1796, Hohenzollern became a General-Major and transferred to the Italian theater. During the Battle of Borghetto on 30 May, he rallied the defeated soldiers and mounted a counterattack on the French in Valeggio sul Mincio. This action won time for th...

    War of the Second Coalition

    During the War of the Second Coalition, Hohenzollern again served in Italy. He commanded a brigade under Pál Kray in a battle at Legnago on 26 March 1799. He fought at the Battle of Magnano where he temporarily commanded a division. He besieged the Milan citadel starting on 30 April and received its surrender on 24 May. On 12 June, with 4,300 soldiers, he attempted to block Jacques MacDonald's much larger French force at Modena but was defeated with heavy losses. He also fought at the battles...

    War of the Third Coalition

    During the War of the Third Coalition, Hohenzollern led a division in the corps of Franz von Werneck in Archduke Ferdinand's army. Deployed in southern Germany, the Austrian army was enveloped by Emperor Napoleon's Grand Army and crushed in the Ulm Campaign. Werneck tried to escape on the north bank of the Danube, but Marshal Joachim Murat launched a relentless pursuit. Hohenzollern's division fought on 16 October at Langenau and 17 October at Herbrechtingen. Murat caught up with the Austrian...

    War of the Fifth Coalition

    At the beginning of the War of the Fifth Coalition, Hohenzollern received appointment to the command of III Armeekorps in the south German theater. He led his corps at the Battle of Teugen-Hausen on 19 April 1809. He also fought at the Battle of Eckmuhl on 22 April. After having traded corps with Johann Kollowrat, he led the II Armee Korps in the Austrian victory at the Battle of Aspern-Essling on 21–22 May. This was the third time that Hohenzollern participated in a defeat of Napoleon, a rar...

    1812-1815

    Hohenzollern commanded a corps in Galicia in 1812. During the latter part of 1813, he led a reserve corps, so he missed the campaign ending in the Battle of Leipzig and the 1814 campaign. When Europe mobilized against France during the Hundred Days, Hohenzollern received command of the II Armeekorps in Schwarzenberg's army but he saw little action.

    Hohenzollern sat as President in the deliberations of the Hofkriegsrat (Aulic Council) from 1825 to 1830. He became a Feldmarschallon 18 September 1830. His wife Maria died in 1835. They had four children, Friedrich Franz Anton (1790-1847), Julia Fredericke (1792-1864), Friedrich Adalbert (1793-1819), and Josephine Fredericke (1795-1878). He died o...

    Printed materials

    1. Bowden, Scotty & Tarbox, Charlie. Armies on the Danube 1809. Arlington, Texas: Empire Games Press, 1980. 2. Boycott-Brown, Martin. The Road to Rivoli. London: Cassell & Co., 2001. ISBN 0-304-35305-1 3. Chandler, David. The Campaigns of Napoleon.New York: Macmillan, 1966. 4. Smith, Digby. The Napoleonic Wars Data Book. London: Greenhill, 1998. ISBN 1-85367-276-9

    Friedrich F. X. Hohenzollernby Digby Smith, compiled by Leopold Kudrna
  3. Friedrich Franz o Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel; Born: 22 December 1732 Berlin, Proushie: Dee'd: 14 October 1758 (aged 25) Faither: Ferdinand Albrecht II, Duke o Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel: Mither: Princess Antoinette o Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel

  4. Prince Karl Franz Josef Wilhelm Friedrich Eduard Paul of Prussia (15 December 1916 – 23 January 1975) was the only child of Prince Joachim of Prussia and his wife Princess Marie-Auguste of Anhalt. [1] [2] He was also the grandson of Wilhelm II, German Emperor . Contents 1 Early life 2 Marriages 2.1 First 2.2 Second 2.3 Third 3 Ancestry 4 References

  5. Stephanie Julianne von Hohenlohe (born Stephany Julienne Richter; 16 September 1891 – 13 June 1972) was an Austrian princess by her marriage to the diplomat Prince Friedrich Franz von Hohenlohe-Waldenburg-Schillingsfürst, a member of the noble Hohenlohe family. She was born a commoner, allegedly of Jewish family background.