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  1. Samuel Taylor Coleridge (/ ˈ k oʊ l ə r ɪ dʒ /; 21 October 1772 – 25 July 1834) was an English poet, literary critic, philosopher and theologian who, with his friend William Wordsworth, was a founder of the Romantic Movement in England and a member of the Lake Poets.

  2. Samuel Taylor Coleridge was an English poet, literary critic and philosopher who, with his friend William Wordsworth, was a founder of the Romantic Movement in England and a member of the Lake Poets.

  3. Samuel Coleridge-Taylor (15 August 1875 – 1 September 1912) was an English composer and conductor.. Of mixed race birth, Coleridge-Taylor achieved such success that he was referred to by white New York musicians as the "African Mahler" when he had three tours of the United States in the early 1900s.

  4. Samuel Taylor Coleridge, the tenth and last child of the vicar of Ottery Saint Mary near Devonshire, England, was born on October 21, 1772. After his father's death in 1782, he was sent to Christ's Hospital for schooling. He had an amazing memory and an eagerness to learn.

  5. 25/03/2019 · Polski: Samuel Coleridge-Taylor (1875–1912), angielski kompozytor muzyki klasycznej, który osiągnął tak wielki sukces, że został nazwany „afrykańskim Mahlerem”. Português : Samuel Coleridge-Taylor (1875-1912) foi um compositor de música clássica britânico , que alcançou tal sucesso a ponto de ser chamado de o " Mahler africano".

  6. 205 quotes from Samuel Taylor Coleridge: 'Common sense in an uncommon degree is what the world calls wisdom.', 'What if you slept And what if In your sleep You dreamed And what if In your dream You went to heaven And there plucked a strange and beautiful flower And what if When you awoke You had that flower in you hand Ah, what then?', and 'Water, water, everywhere, And all the boards did ...

  7. Digital Stewardship Services. About The Etext Center; Digital Text Markup; Etext Projects; TEI Encoding Guidelines; About The Etext Center. The Electronic Text Center (1992-2007), known to many as “Etext,” served the University community’s teaching and research needs in the areas of humanities text encoding for over fifteen years.